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Is Beef Liver Usually Inexpensive?

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  • Is Beef Liver Usually Inexpensive?

    There's a meat store out in the country I go to once in a blue moon. Today I was there and happened to see a lone package of beef liver in their freezer. From what I've read, liver is nutritionally good, so I snatched it up. It was only $1.49 a lb. Is beef liver normally this cheap, or did I just buy a funky eat-at-your-own-risk product?
    I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

  • #2
    No that sounds about right, beef liver is one of the very cheapest meats. Other really cheap ones at the grocery are chicken hearts, pig feet and fatty cuts of pork.

    Ground meat or skinless meat often costs a lot more because of the labor. Unprocessed meat is cheap and organ meat is usually the cheapest of the unprocessed meat. Most people don't like the taste so count your blessings and enjoy your liver.
    My journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread37921.html

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    • #3
      That's good to know. This will be my first time eating beef liver, and I'm pretty excited.
      I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Heidi View Post
        That's good to know. This will be my first time eating beef liver, and I'm pretty excited.
        add Bacon+Onions, and you'll have a party.

        LOTS of Bacon+Onions. (Like 2x as much as the Liver.)

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        • #5
          Lots of bacon and onions it is, then. Adding bacon to my beef stew recipe is how I finally got my non-primal kids and husband to eat it without dumplings on top. Bacon is awesome!
          I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Heidi View Post
            . Bacon is awesome!
            Truly, you are possessed of wisdom.

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            • #7
              My late grandmother used to prepare a dish called Liver Hasslett (or something like that). I am trying to find someone in my family who still has her old recipe. I used to eat it like candy when I was a kid. if memory serves, she cut the liver up into bite size pieces, cut up a few onions, add salt and black pepper, and boil the hell out of it. it had a very unique texture, and I remember soaking a few biscuits with the 'gravy'. Of course, I can't do that anymore, but the liver would sure be good!!!
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              • #8
                I got a tip from a local farmer to grind up liver in the food processor and add it to meatloaf. I have not tried it yet, but I have both beef and lamb liver in my freezer from our CSA. I'm not sure I'd otherwise get past the textural issues. Anyone have other suggestions?
                My blog (primal after 8/5/11).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DarthFriendly View Post
                  Truly, you are possessed of wisdom.
                  I owe it all to Sisson and people like you in this forum. I have seen the light, and it is fueled by bacon grease!
                  I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bamaphotopro View Post
                    My late grandmother used to prepare a dish called Liver Hasslett (or something like that). I am trying to find someone in my family who still has her old recipe. I used to eat it like candy when I was a kid. if memory serves, she cut the liver up into bite size pieces, cut up a few onions, add salt and black pepper, and boil the hell out of it. it had a very unique texture, and I remember soaking a few biscuits with the 'gravy'. Of course, I can't do that anymore, but the liver would sure be good!!!
                    I have never boiled meat before. Now I want to try it out.
                    I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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                    • #11
                      I made the beef liver earlier today, complete with bacon and onions. My 7 yr old loved it and had two bowls. I couldn't get my 3 yr old to touch the stuff though (he's an incredibly picky eater and has such a poor diet ) and my husband says he'll try some later (code for "I'll be eating Subway for dinner" ).

                      While the liver was cooking, it gave off a weird metallic smell. But when it came time to eat, it reminded me of game meat. Usually I cook venison with lots of butter to counter the gamey taste, but one time I cooked it plain and that's what the beef liver reminded me of. Not bad at all. I'm psyched to find more. Guess I'll have to check out some local butchers and see if they sell liver.
                      I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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                      • #12
                        Some things you can do to make liver taste a little better: I've found that a few drops of lemon juice on each side while cooking helps. Also, don't overcook, I do about 2.5 minuter per side on a medium-high heat. I don't cook with onions since I use it as a quick breakfast but do use lots of garlic and onion powder. Experiment with different kinds, I don't like chicken but really like bison.

                        Yes liver is cheap although I read that before our nation's low fat craze, liver used to be a more expensive cut of meat. Oddly in my experience, liver and offal is actually cheaper at the very yuppie farmer's markets where the typical customer is looking for low fat, expensive cuts of meat. I have actually found offal to be more expensive at some of the ethic markets in my area that cater to a Hispanic or Asian demographic.

                        I found a recipe once for sweet potato liver pancakes but could not get my kids to eat it.

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                        • #13
                          I appreciate the cooking and buying tips. I definitely want to try adding lemon juice for a little bit of kick. And that recipe for pancakes is unlike anything I've ever heard of. Was it any good?
                          I'm retraining and strengthening my taste buds, one primal meal at a time.

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                          • #14
                            I like to put some kind of Indian spice blend on mine.
                            You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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                            • #15
                              All that jazz is dirt cheap but so nutritious. If it were priced in dollars per nutritious benefit, it would cost one hundred bucks, American.

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