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    What causes high uric acid? If a person has high uric acid, are they supposed to avoid meat and organs?

  • #2
    High uric acid is one of the indicators of gout and the typical CW advice is to avoid meat, organs and alcohol. I have researched whether paleo would benefit my gouty brother and unfortunately have not found any evidence that it would ease the gout.

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    • #3
      At one point someone here posted some information about fructose causing increased uric acid.... and then reducing fructose intake could help with gout.... I'll see if I can find it.

      Here is one article....I am not sure how legit this is. Interesting though - my dad has hypertension, heart disease, and gout and eats a lot of fructose.

      http://docchat.wordpress.com/2010/01...heart-disease/
      Last edited by jammies; 09-06-2011, 08:25 PM.
      Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

      http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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      • #4
        There are some recent studies linking gout to soda. Not sure if it's the HFCS or something else.

        Here is an article that I read recently (although it's from 2008).
        Blame Sweet Soda for Gout?

        Summary:
        2+ soft drinks per day (not diet) raised gout risk by 85%
        1 soft drink per day raised gout risk by 45%
        4-5 per week raised gout risk by 29%

        Beer raised the risk by 49% per daily serving and spirits by 15%.

        Anyone see the wheat and grain there? Anyone?
        soda = HFCS, Beer = Wheat+barley, Spirits = grains, potatoes or corn.

        hmmm?

        ~rc

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        • #5
          Given that both fructose and alcohol have the same contribution to fatty liver its not hard to see them both implicated in gout
          Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

          Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Adrianag View Post
            High uric acid is one of the indicators of gout and the typical CW advice is to avoid meat, organs and alcohol. I have researched whether paleo would benefit my gouty brother and unfortunately have not found any evidence that it would ease the gout.
            Cordain did an interesting article on gout - it was part of a newsletter I think. Paleo improved gout. Some people get gout as under-excretors.

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            • #7
              Excellent article here:
              Emotions for Engineers: The Causes of Gout

              A reader of gnolls.org reported that he hasn't had a twinge of gout since going Paleo...including high consumption of grass-fed beef.

              Keep in mind that a typical contributor would be "energy gels" and any fructose-containing food consumed during exercise, which is about the worst thing you can do for gout. If you can't just work out fasted, any exercise food needs to be 100% fructose-free.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by girlhk View Post
                What causes high uric acid? If a person has high uric acid, are they supposed to avoid meat and organs?
                Fructose metabolism produces uric acid. Apparently, so does drinking beer (not so much other alcohols).




                Gout: The Missing Chapter from Good Calories, Bad Calories

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                • #9
                  My favorite source for all questions dealing with health issues is Cardiologist Dr. Wm Davis. He says THIS about high uric acid & gout. ( Gout is a severe form of arthritis )

                  • Cranberries block uric acid production–Cranberries have the unique ability to block the activity of an enzyme, xanthine oxidase, that converts xanthine to uric acid. Uric acid is believed to add to heart disease risk and is the factor responsible for gout.
                  Eat cranberries | The Heart Scan Blog

                  * Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup (soda pop) and all sweetened products:
                  Add to this the data that show that fructose increases uric acid (that causes gout and may act as a coronary risk factor), induces leptin resistance, causes metabolic syndrome (pre-diabetes), and increases appetite, and it is clear that fructose is yet another common food additive that, along with wheat, is likely a big part of the reason Americans are fat and diabetic.
                  Goodbye, fructose | The Heart Scan Blog

                  –Diuretics (Thiazides) increase uric acid–Uric acid is increasingly looking like a coronary risk factor: The higher the uric acid blood level, the greater the risk for heart attack. Thiazides have long been known to increase uric acid, occasionally sufficient to trigger attacks of gout (uric acid crystals that precipitate in joints, like rock candy). (Fully detailed Special Report on uric acid coming this week on the Track Your Plaque website.)
                  Thiazide diuretics: Treatment of choice for high blood pressure? | The Heart Scan Blog

                  * Beyond the fact that fructose stimulates liver production of glycerol, which thereby increases liver VLDL production and raises blood levels of triglycerides; likely stimulates appetite; increases cholesterol levels; fructose has also been clearly implicated in increasing blood levels of uric acid.
                  Uric acid is the substance that, in some people, precipitates in joints and causes gout, the painful inflammatory arthritis that has been increasing in prevalence over the last four decades since the introduction of fructose in 1967. While blood levels of uric acid in the early part of the 20th century averaged 3.5 mg/dl, more recent population assessments have averaged 6.0 mg/dl or higher. (Non-human mammals who don’t eat processed foods, drink fruit drinks or beer, and don’t eat candy have uric acid levels of <2.0 mg/dl.)
                  Yet another reason to avoid fructose | The Heart Scan Blog

                  * excessive uric acid) and kidney stones are among the unhealthy consequences of excessive quantities of meats in our diets.
                  Are humans meant to be omnivores? | The Heart Scan Blog

                  * Niacin is safe however side affects can aggravate gout
                  Media mis-information | The Heart Scan Blog

                  Hope this helps,
                  Grizz
                  Last edited by Grizz; 09-07-2011, 02:07 AM.

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                  • #10
                    * excessive uric acid) and kidney stones are among the unhealthy consequences of excessive quantities of meats in our diets.
                    I understand the fructose and beer connections, but paleo /primal usually leads to higher meat intake, which is also contraindicated. So this leaves dairy and vegetables?
                    Last edited by Adrianag; 09-07-2011, 02:43 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Adrianag View Post
                      I understand the fructose and beer connections, but paleo /primal usualy leads to higher meat intake, which is also contraindicated. So this leaves dairy and vegetables?
                      Cordain tested the paleo it was fine regardless of the meat.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sue View Post
                        Cordain tested the paleo it was fine regardless of the meat.
                        Thanks, Sue, If you can find me some links, I'd appreciate it.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Adrianag View Post
                          I understand the fructose and beer connections, but paleo /primal usually leads to higher meat intake, which is also contraindicated. So this leaves dairy and vegetables?
                          I think the meat may be "fuel" for gout for now, but you simply need to change the way the metabolism works and that metabolic pathway returns to normal. This came up on Art De Vany's site, and he reckons that once your metabolism is corrected by a paleo lifestyle, the meat intake would not be a concern regarding gout. As he put it "You can't have gout on EF after your metabolism has healed". (EF = evolutionary fitness, his program that preceded primal)
                          Last edited by brachiate; 09-07-2011, 02:53 AM.
                          The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you're still a rat.
                          (Lily Tomlin)

                          I take life easier than almost anyone I know, but when I exercise I do it as though my life depends on it (which it does).
                          (Arthur De Vany)

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                          • #14
                            I have no idea about science and research but this is my experience. I had high uric acid levels for ages and my doctor told me to reduce my exercise (I exercise for 1 hour, 6 days a week weights and cardio), well there was no way I thought that was the problem so I continued doing what I was doing as my doctors fix for anything I have wrong with me is to reduce my exercise. My diet at the time was low fat, probably low calorie as I was always hungry and thinking about food, the only grains I really had was oatmeal in the morning so the rest of my food was protein, veggies and salads and protein shakes.

                            I went primal last October and I have no idea whether it was the diet change to a higher fat, and probably higher calorie (I never log my food or count calories so have no idea) but when I went for my blood test my uric acid levels came back in the normal range.

                            Strange hey!
                            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread45312.html[SIGPIC]

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Adrianag View Post
                              Thanks, Sue, If you can find me some links, I'd appreciate it.
                              Adrianag, tried looking for links seems to not be available on-line anymore. I do have the pdf of the gout newsletter saved to my computer so I can email it to you if you want? Or is it possible for me to link it somehow?

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