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  • Toddler nutrition

    My two year old doesn't really dig meat, I think because it can be harder to chew. He loves meatballs and burger and stuff, and of course fish sticks/chicken fingers/processed meat. Does anyone have suggestions for easier to chew proteins -- especially ones I can easily pack him in his lunches at day care. They don't heat foods up for the kids, and of course they suggest that I send him with sandwiches and pastas because he won't eat the leftover steak that we cut up, or leftover pork chop or whatever. He loves vegetables too, but he can't just eat vegetables. I am tempted to just do pasta and breads so he'll eat something, but I know ultimately it's not a great idea. Maybe leftover salmon, or hard boiled eggs, but I know the teachers already think I'm kind of a kooky parent and I don't want to gross them out with the smell of eggs and/or fish. At least not more than once a week.

    Any suggestions?

  • #2
    Get a meat grinder or use a food processor and make meat "paste" that he can dip slightly parboiled carrot sticks in.

    Cheese sticks are good, too.

    Avocados can be halved and eaten with a spoon (maybe filled with meat paste?)

    Cream cheese filled dates

    Bacon (if it's not too tough)
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    • #3
      Tuna/Egg/Chicken salad...all easy to chew, and who cares if they smell! They'll get over it. Meatballls are also a good choice-can send them in a thermos or eat them cold. Soups w/really small pieces of meat? Liver pate. Greek yogurt.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by Qwerty View Post
        Maybe leftover salmon, or hard boiled eggs, but I know the teachers already think I'm kind of a kooky parent and I don't want to gross them out with the smell of eggs and/or fish.
        The teachers don't like the smell of real food? Too bad.

        Originally posted by Qwerty View Post
        At least not more than once a week.
        I say do it as often as you think necessary.

        Hard-boiled eggs only really smell if they're overcooked. I start them in cold water, bring just to the boil and immediately turn the heat down, so they only simmer. After about 6 minutes of simmering they should be done. At that point, plunge them in cold water to arrest the cooking.

        But it doesn't have to be hardboiled eggs. Lots of cultures have cold omelettes of some sort—fritatta in Italy, tortilla in Spain, and so on. You can make a large open-faced omelette with plenty of vegetables (and perhaps bits of sausage) in, finish the top under the grill and when it's cold cut it in wedges.

        Any suggestions?
        Try the recipes page from the Nutritional Weight and Wellness ladies in Minnesota. They have some pretty good podcasts; their recipes are going to be along lines similar to Primal:

        Recipes

        For example, there's an egg-bake, which is a similar idea to the open-faced omelette idea, but here they bake it in an oven.

        They've also got some wheat-free chicken nuggets made with an almond meal coating. Looks like there are fish cakes there, too—that could be good

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        • #5
          Have you tried leftover "Meatza"?...Very good cold.
          Free your mind, and your Grok will follow!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
            Get a meat grinder or use a food processor and make meat "paste" that he can dip slightly parboiled carrot sticks in.
            The fancy version of that is Pâté. Rillettes also seem to be good option.

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            • #7
              Maybe leftover salmon, or hard boiled eggs, but I know the teachers already think I'm kind of a kooky parent and I don't want to gross them out with the smell of eggs and/or fish.
              The teachers don't like the smell of real food? Too bad.
              Well, these people are my kid's primary caregivers during the week - they've been taking awesome care of him (and ten other toddlers) for two years, and have maybe changed more of his poopy diapers than I have. I don't need to make their jobs any harder, or stinkier.

              Thanks for all the ideas, everyone. I don't know why I didn't think of all this stuff on my own, I guess I was just in a rut. Pate! Pate is a good idea. I find that leftover pot roast is also easy on the teeth the next day.

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              • #8
                When I sent my 3yo to day camp at her preschool, I sent her with some cheese, fruit (grapes), baby carrots, bologna, and a juice box. I didn't want to send much that had to be warmed up or anything like that. She loves fruit, lunch meat, shrimp, cheese, yogurt, and veggies the best.
                If your daycare is willing to help LO eat, maybe try sending a yogurt with them?
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