Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Article: Humans ate grains 100,000 years ago

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Article: Humans ate grains 100,000 years ago



    Hey guys. I just stumbled upon an article today that's going to be contentious in our circle. In short, an archaeologist has discovered what he believes to be evidence of humans processing grains for consumption 100,000 years ago.


    Have a read:

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/bl...-le-2009-12-17


  • #2
    1



    And potatoes, too! Although I have no idea what an African potato is.

    Comment


    • #3
      1



      I'm sure there are isolated cases of cultures eating grains more than 10,000 years ago. When we talk about the 20,000 - 10,000 year ago mark, I assume it means when humans as an entire species generally started consuming grains as a main staple of their diet.

      Comment


      • #4
        1



        I'm guessing here, but maybe the progenitor of yams?

        Comment


        • #5
          1

          [quote]


          Curtis Marean, an archeologist at Arizona State University in Tempe, isn't sure. "Grasses can be used for many things," he notes, such as bedding or kindling. Even if Ngalue's residents were dining on sorghum more than 100,000 years ago, Marean doubts that it was a major food source. "The processing costs of wild grasses are so high," he says, "and most African environments have a diversity of far more productive foods for hunter-gatherers."
          </blockquote>


          Maybe they used a handful of grass to clean the butchering block?
          [quote]


          Huw Barton, an archeologist at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom, is skeptical as well. He points out that Mercader found sorghum residue on tools that likely wouldn&#39;t be used to process cereals, such as drills. "That doesn&#39;t make any sense to me," he says.
          </blockquote>


          http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2009/1217/2


          Also, the African potato is not a potato. It&#39;s other name is star grass:
          [quote]

          "A study on the safety and efficacy of the hypoxis plant (African potato) extract in HIV-positive patients was terminated prematurely, and reported to the Medicines Control Council, because most of the patients who received the extract showed severe bone marrow suppression after eight weeks," the study found.
          </blockquote>


          http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=31&art_id=vn2003071513 4316530C349682


          It looks like the African potato messes with your immune system?

          The "Seven Deadly Sins"

          Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . . Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
          Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
          Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

          Comment


          • #6
            1



            This is not too surprising. We forget that humans 100000 and 200000 years ago are still humans, which means they had the intelligence to find wild grains and cook them. I&#39;m pretty sure they tried cooking everything around them and through generations figured out what&#39;s edible and what&#39;s not.


            Although of course the grains/seeds cooked then resemble none of the mass-produced denatured white flour and sugar products available now.


            Species-wise, agriculture was a great idea. We are tremendously successful. Indivdual-wise, not so much.

            Comment


            • #7
              1



              Cooking grains would have required some sort of container, as far as I can see. Most HG&#39;s even today lack such thing, they just put the meat right on the fire.


              Proving, if that is the right word, that some ancestor some time, some where ate grains doesn&#39;t mean they became a staple suddenly, worldwide. No, the evidence is overwhelming that grains are a cause of a lot of health problems. As the Groks were both very active and probably mostly died young, many grain ailments would never manifest themselves.

              Comment


              • #8
                1



                I agree with OTB. It also took thousands of years from cereal grains originally grown in Mesopotamia to be bred to grow in northern climes. It&#39;s not like *poof* every human was eating (insert food name here) here at (insert your radio-carbon date here) everywhere in the world. Granted,ancient humans tried to eat just about anything they could get into their mouths: grain, seeds, grubs, bugs, animals, fruit, veg. They could not have based their diet on it and what irks me about these kinds of articles. They imply that that is the case. "Oh look we&#39;ve been eating this stuff for XXX amount of years, it must be okay". It would have been was for the short time it was ripe/available. Then it was onto whatever was ripe/available next.

                Comment

                Working...
                X