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Uh.. what does kale look like? (non-English speaker)

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  • Uh.. what does kale look like? (non-English speaker)

    Hi everyone.

    Having a bit of trouble putting my finger on just what kale is, locally (I live in Spain).

    Let's see... my first attempt at buying it, which was today, turned up this:

    http://lh6.ggpht.com/__YwOO7zVeoY/SH...BoyQ/Berza.jpg
    (removed inline image 'cause it was huge... click on the link for a pícture)

    That is what is locally known as berza or col rizada.

    Have I bought kale, or something else entirely? Having my first taste of it just now, I used the outer leaves (as opposed to throwing them away), gave them a good scrubbing (I did find a couple tiny bugs but I figure it's normal - I just hope the rest of them don't take over my fridge!), chopped them up and and steamed them in a cup in the microwave, the way I sometimes eat cabbage.

    Added a handful of (cooked) white rice (YES, I know... I just wanted some rice, 'k? ), a couple spoonfuls of olive oil, salt, pepper, and a healthy helping of paprika, mixed it all up and... it's good! The leaves, these at least, are quite meaty, and it is bitter-ish, but I like the taste. I want to try it raw in a salad, but I figured it'd be a good idea to try it cooked first - just in case it didn't agree with me straight away.

    So, anyway... back to the original question, can anyone confirm whether the picture above is of what the English-speaking world knows as kale?

    Thanks!!


    D

  • #2


    Frilly! :P
    I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

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    • #3
      Originally posted by DeeEm View Post
      Hi everyone.

      Having a bit of trouble putting my finger on just what kale is, locally (I live in Spain).
      As you see in the second post, Americans use the word "kale" for something else. In my country kale looks like in Spain. I've tried both and found our variant (the head) tastier. One of my favorite recipes: Use butter to fry some onions, then add cubed pork shoulder, let it brown, and add shredded kale. Season to taste (salt, pepper). Add water but not much, just so the food does not burn (I use a crockpot and do not need any water at all). Cook until the kale is mashy and the meat is tender. It is really good!
      Last edited by Farfalla; 08-24-2011, 02:05 PM.

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      • #4
        You're making my mouth water, and I've JUST HAD DINNER.

        Awesome. Will keep in mind.

        Thanks!!

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        • #5
          The first picture is savoy cabbage...fairly similar but slightly softer texture.
          Finally uncovering the real me!

          My 'Serious Six' journal.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gingernut View Post
            The first picture is savoy cabbage...fairly similar but slightly softer texture.
            .... and much, much nicer - not a lover of kale as you can probably tell!

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            • #7
              kale, images - Google Search


              Hay muchas clases de 'kale'.

              En el EEUU estoy acostumbrado a comiendo el tipo que aparece en el primer retrato de la segunda fila.
              Tayatha om bekandze

              Bekandze maha bekandze

              Randza samu gate soha

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              • #8
                Kale is much better if you pick it after a light frost. It makes sugar as a form of anti-freeze. In warm weather, kale is awfully bitter. You could boil it and change the water to get some of the bitters out of it, but I prefer to eat it raw in salads during fall and spring when there is a little bit of frost at night.

                Kale doesn't head up, so you can pick leaves and it will grow more. I like "Red Russian Kale" the best. It's really a mixture of light purple and gray-green.

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                • #9
                  So would this savoy cabbage be comparable, nutritionally, to 'proper' kale? I do believe that they're from the same family (brassica oleracea or something like that), from what little I've just read.

                  Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    You've also got cavolo nero, aka black kale, aka black cabbage, aka Tuscan cabbage, which is my favourite. It has a much softer, almost velvet like leafe and gentler flavour.

                    In fact, last weekend I planted several seedlings of both the cavolo nero and curly (or scots) kale varieties in my new veggie patch
                    If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

                    Originally posted by tfarny
                    If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

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                    • #11
                      As you can see, there are many kinds of kale. My favorite is dinosaur kale (like Misabi likes), which has longer, darker and less-frilly leaves. It is also called palm kale, or Italian kale. You might have better success finding that kind, since it grows well in warmer climates. In the U.S. curly kale is usually called a Russian or Siberian kale. I have never heard of Scot's kale. I grow all of them, but I enjoy the Italian kind mostly in the summer and the Russian varieties in the winter.

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                      • #12
                        I'm having this one raw(r!) for the first time - it's not bad, but I thought it'd have a stronger taste. When I brought it home (in a regular plastic bag) and got it out to put it in the fridge, it stank to high heaven. Though after just a few minutes out in the open and in the fridge, there was little smell left. Read somewhere that it's because of the sulphur content, which I figure concentrates inside the bag.

                        So far I think I liked it better cooked, but I already have a few more elaborate ideas for salads, too.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DeeEm View Post
                          So would this savoy cabbage be comparable, nutritionally, to 'proper' kale? I do believe that they're from the same family (brassica oleracea or something like that), from what little I've just read.

                          Thanks!
                          The cabbage is a little lower in calories gram for gram, but the micronutrients look comparable. Kale vs Savoy Cabbage

                          Some internet resources that might help you in the future:
                          Google Images
                          Nutrition facts, calories in food, labels, nutritional information and analysis - NutritionData.com
                          "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

                          I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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