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Overeating protein=Fat?

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  • Overeating protein=Fat?

    While reviewing an older personal trainer certification book, I was flipping through the bioenergetics section and came upon a chart which showed the affects of exess consumptions of macronutrients. It showed protein, fat, and carbohydrate as all being stored as fat if eating in "excess." This lies contrary to PB, Paleo, etc... Would love to get some opinions on this. I do understand that protein can convert into glucose, which if unused can become fat. However, why would this conversion happen if it wasn't necessary? Also, the book did not mention at which instance, protein, fat, and carb were considered to be excessive. I have read the several calorie articles on this website searching for the answer and am still unclear on the issue.

  • #2
    The body will convert a certain amount of protein to glucose - it's called gluconeogenesis, and it's mostly to deal with what the brain might need in terms of glucose that a Paleo diet doesn't provide. When was that book published? If it was after 1950, it's probably wrong.
    Primal eating in a nutshell: If you are hungry, eat Primal food until you are satisfied (not stuffed). Then stop. Wait until you're hungry again. Repeat.

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    • #3
      I will check on the publishing date but it most certainly was after 1950. I do understand that the brain has demands for glucose as a fuel and that if there isn't any in the blood and if liver and muscle glycogen stores are depleted, protein can be converted to glucose and can fuel the brain. I'm mostly interested in seeing the mechanisms of protein becoming stored fat.

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      • #4
        When you eat tacos you get cho they make you fat!

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        • #5
          I am a little confused by your question.....you seem to have answered it yourself - excess protein is converted to amino acids which are converted to sugars in the liver. Gluconeogenesis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

          Too much protein can also lead to elevated blood sugar and or insulin.

          Primal Blueprint advocates a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Excess carbohydrate intake (particularly in the form of highly processed grains) will drive chronic elevated insulin levels, cause derangement of satiety signals and result in weight gain. It is much harder to overeat a diet that comprised of higher amounts of protein and fats.

          How to Eat According to the Primal Blueprint | Mark's Daily Apple
          Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

          http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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          • #6
            Health Correlator: Dietary protein does not become body fat if you are on a low carbohydrate diet

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            • #7
              We all fat! Yay

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jammies View Post
                I am a little confused by your question.....you seem to have answered it yourself - excess protein is converted to amino acids which are converted to sugars in the liver. Gluconeogenesis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                Too much protein can also lead to elevated blood sugar and or insulin.

                Primal Blueprint advocates a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Excess carbohydrate intake (particularly in the form of highly processed grains) will drive chronic elevated insulin levels, cause derangement of satiety signals and result in weight gain. It is much harder to overeat a diet that comprised of higher amounts of protein and fats.

                How to Eat According to the Primal Blueprint | Mark's Daily Apple

                Thanks for the reply! I'm specifically interested in "too much protein can also lead to elevated blood sugar and insulin." How can one judge "too much protein"? Also, why is hard to overeat protein? Satiety factors?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GNARL View Post
                  Thanks for the reply! I'm specifically interested in "too much protein can also lead to elevated blood sugar and insulin." How can one judge "too much protein"? Also, why is hard to overeat protein? Satiety factors?
                  I'm no expert but based on my own experience; yes, it is the satiety factor. Being full on proteins is an entirely different experience than being full on say pasta.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GNARL View Post
                    Thanks for the reply! I'm specifically interested in "too much protein can also lead to elevated blood sugar and insulin." How can one judge "too much protein"? Also, why is hard to overeat protein? Satiety factors?
                    Protein has a high satiety factor, as does fat.
                    Because excess protein is converted to amino acids which are converted to sugars in the liver, it has the potential to elevate blood glucose and insulin levels. It you eat a moderate fat and moderate protein diet, this can be avoided. The common recommendation is to eat fat with protein to stunt the potential insulin and blood glucose problems.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by NDF View Post
                      Protein has a high satiety factor, as does fat.
                      Because excess protein is converted to amino acids which are converted to sugars in the liver, it has the potential to elevate blood glucose and insulin levels. It you eat a moderate fat and moderate protein diet, this can be avoided. The common recommendation is to eat fat with protein to stunt the potential insulin and blood glucose problems.
                      Thanks for the reply. Don't amino acids undergo conversion into sugar only when there isn't enough glycogen in muscles and in liver? So if enough carb is eaten to create glycogen, amino acids will probably not be broken down into sugars no matter how much is eaten?

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                      • #12
                        His advice on protein vs. fat is pretty much backwards from any high fat weight loss study I've read. It may be a blog on statistics, but he seems to be just guess at best ratios and the implications of very high fat. Not that most people want to eat very high fat on an ongoing basis.

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                        • #14
                          Originally posted by chima_p View Post
                          +100000000!

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                          • #15
                            Excess FOOD is stores as fat--period. It doesn't matter whether it's excess carbs, fat, or protein.

                            It's a myth that eating low carb prevents fat storage. For a while, I ate less than 10g carbs a day--and when I ate too much, I gained weight.

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