Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where to find good lard?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Where to find good lard?

    My friend and I are going to be cooking up a storm soon and we wanted to use lard. But I made her promise (she's not Primal) that we'd use a good kind.

    The kind I see in my Latino store is either the bulk kind from the butcher section or the Farmer John's brand. Would either be good or, if not, where should I go? Thankies!

  • #2
    There's the best, and then there's the rest.

    High-CLA, grass-fed tallow (a.k.a. "lard"):

    U.S. Wellness Meats (love them!)
    U.S. Wellness Meats — Our Animals Eat Right So You Can Too.
    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Phoenixflame View Post
      My friend and I are going to be cooking up a storm soon and we wanted to use lard. But I made her promise (she's not Primal) that we'd use a good kind.

      The kind I see in my Latino store is either the bulk kind from the butcher section or the Farmer John's brand. Would either be good or, if not, where should I go? Thankies!
      Apparently, in the U.S. some of it is hydrogenated. Don't know if those brands are. A quick google search finds me low-carb forums recommending these as sources of lard from organic or free-range pigs:

      Linda's Lard

      Pork, Beef, Chicken and Lard Products from Prairie Pride Farm

      The thread I found mentioned more than twice that number, but some of them seem to have gone since.

      Comment


      • #4
        High-CLA, grass-fed tallow (a.k.a. "lard"):
        Isn't tallow ex-cow and lard ex-pig?
        activate the rhythm, the rhythm that has always been within

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by localad View Post
          Isn't tallow ex-cow and lard ex-pig?
          Yep.

          Comment


          • #6
            OP, do you have a place where you can get good-quality natural bacon (or other very fatty pork) from hormone-free or pastured animals? If so, strain and save the fat from that and keep it in the fridge, where it will last for a very very very long time.

            Comment


            • #7
              If you can't find real proper lard (ask a real butcher) I'd go to the best butcher in your town and ask them for a couple pounds of pork back fat. Then follow instructions to render your own - its very easy to do the "dry" crockpot method.
              If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

              Comment


              • #8
                You can also make your own very easily from pork fat.
                Lifting Journal

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ok, thanks guys!

                  Question about making your own: does it smell strongly? I'd be down to make it in a crockpot but I have some roommates moving in soon and don't want them to forever think of me as the weird pork fat girl.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is what the website says:
                    "We welcome you to discover the health benefits of cooking with omega 3 and CLA rich grass-fed tallow! Our tallow (sometimes known as lard) is simply rendered beef suet. Naturally pure white in color with omega 6:3 ratios similar to fish and no trans fats. It has not been bleached, deodorized, hydrogenated or altered."
                    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Lard smells when it renders, but not after that.
                      Lifting Journal

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Phoenixflame View Post
                        Ok, thanks guys!

                        Question about making your own: does it smell strongly? I'd be down to make it in a crockpot but I have some roommates moving in soon and don't want them to forever think of me as the weird pork fat girl.
                        It does smell, but your roommates will think of you as the weird pork fat girl sooner or later (eventually they'll call you their super-healthy roomie). Why not get the ball rolling honestly, with a few pounds of liquid pig fat in the kitchen?
                        If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          "weird pork fat girl"
                          LMAO.
                          "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tfarny View Post
                            It does smell, but your roommates will think of you as the weird pork fat girl sooner or later (eventually they'll call you their super-healthy roomie). Why not get the ball rolling honestly, with a few pounds of liquid pig fat in the kitchen?
                            Truth.
                            Lifting Journal

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TigerLily View Post
                              This is what the website says:
                              "We welcome you to discover the health benefits of cooking with omega 3 and CLA rich grass-fed tallow! Our tallow (sometimes known as lard) is simply rendered beef suet. Naturally pure white in color with omega 6:3 ratios similar to fish and no trans fats. It has not been bleached, deodorized, hydrogenated or altered."
                              "Lard" is actually the French word for bacon. So nothing to do with beef.

                              You often find in English that food terms, as opposed to livestock terms, are French in origin. Pork/Pig, Beef/Cow, Mutton/Sheep. It's often said that that's because Norman-French invaders got to eat the food whereas the Saxon peasants tended the food animals. There's probably something in that. At any rate, I guess the people who wrote recipes down and established the culinary language would have been using what was, until the 15th century, the more prestigious language.

                              Tallow used to tend to be used of fat, often pretty anonymous fat, used for greasing boats and the like. "Tallow candles" (as opposed to beeswax candles) were usually made from sheep fat. Suet is specifically the fat round the kidneys. That's the best stuff—and really it's still suet whether it's rendered or not. A block of beef fat of no particular sort was often known traditionally as "dripping"—because you collected it when it dripped from the joint.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X