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cheap, easy to make, non insulin-spiking carb sources?

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  • cheap, easy to make, non insulin-spiking carb sources?

    baked sweet potatoes are the easiest and fastest to make, but they still have a GI comparable to white rice...boiled potatoes take longer to make and in order to lower the GI you gata stick em in the fridge and eat em cold, which isn't too pleasant

    Also how much does dietary fat blunt the insulin spike? Like lets say I have a cup of white rice, how much olive oil should be added so that it doesnt send my blood sugar outta wack

  • #2
    I think white rice is cheapest and easiest to make: no peeling, no need to turn on the oven. Microwaved potatoes are pretty fast too. And couldn't you cool the baked sweet potatoes too?

    As for the GI, I wouldn't worry about it too much. If you're eating the carbs post-workout, an insulin spike is good (assuming you have an otherwise healthy metabolism; ie no diabetes). I don't know if there are any guidelines quantifying how much fat will blunt a spike as a general rule since there are so many variables and so much variation between individuals. The best bet would be to test your blood glucose before and at several times after (30 min, 1 hour, 2 hour) eating to see how it affects you.

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    • #3
      Cold cooked potatoes are quite something with a big blob of butter on top. Just saying.
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      • #4
        I just poke a sweet potato with a fork, wrap it in dampened paper towel and trow into microwave for 4 to 6 min, depending on how powerful micro is and how big the potatoe is or I slice it thick, boil an electric kettle and steam the slices in an old-fashioned steaming basket. Very fast and cools fast.
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        • #5
          Insulin spikes aren't necessarily bad. If you're in a metabolic state where you're looking for more carbs, don't worry about the insulin.

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          • #6
            So should carbs only be used to refil glycogen cells? Are they unnnesecary when they are full unless your about to preform some sort of streneous workout?

            That would seem to make sense because almost all straight carb sources have a high GI, which I understand isnt bad after a good workout.

            Last night I had plenty of carbs so i'm positive my glycogen is topped off. So, my first today meal should be protein and fat. Later on in the day, like on break at work, I should have some carbs to refil my glycogen used up from working (which involves alot of movement like walking/lifting/stocking shelves/dealing with old people)

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            • #7
              Black/pinto/kidney/garbanzo beans are great. Very low GI and very high fiber. It's up to you if you want to eat legumes. I think most beans are better than nuts. Some squashes like butternut work as well, though they're not all that starchy compared to a potato or rice.

              The question is, why would you want starches that don't create an insulin spike? I eat a lot of starch for refeeds, but the whole point is the insulin spike, so I go for higher GI carbs. It's the low GI carbs I see little point in - you're taking in carbs and raising your blood sugar, but you're losing the beneficial insulin spike...not to mention the high GI carbs taste better - potatoes, rice, breads, etc. Why are you searching for a low GI carb source?

              PS - the plan tonight is 2-4 99% lean ground turkey burgers and 2 pounds of white potato oven fries. Low fat, high carb and oh so good.
              Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                Black/pinto/kidney/garbanzo beans are great. Very low GI and very high fiber. It's up to you if you want to eat legumes. I think most beans are better than nuts. Some squashes like butternut work as well, though they're not all that starchy compared to a potato or rice.

                The question is, why would you want starches that don't create an insulin spike? I eat a lot of starch for refeeds, but the whole point is the insulin spike, so I go for higher GI carbs. It's the low GI carbs I see little point in - you're taking in carbs and raising your blood sugar, but you're losing the beneficial insulin spike...not to mention the high GI carbs taste better - potatoes, rice, breads, etc. Why are you searching for a low GI carb source?

                PS - the plan tonight is 2-4 99% lean ground turkey burgers and 2 pounds of white potato oven fries. Low fat, high carb and oh so good.
                I fell back into the CW way of thinking honestly, going too low carb mades me feel like shit and my energy levels plummet so i've been eating em throughout the day, but i think i've been eating too many carbs and it's been making me hungrey. And i'm not gonna lie i've been eating grains because they're cheap and fast. I've been lazy, i should prepare my meals ahead of time and stuff...

                I think I should still eat them throughout the day, but maybe cut back a bit and only eat enough to refill my glycogen and keep me going....

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                • #9
                  Have you gone long enough not eating carbs? You may feel lousy because you haven't given your body long enough to get used to burning fats. I abolished starches from my system for almost 3 months, and now I run fine both ways. I could eat 300g of carbs in a day or 0g of carbs in a day and still have good energy. However, I feel MUCH better in terms of workouts when I have carbs. They don't make me any hungrier, either, so I can eat 2 pounds of potatoes in a day and not get sugar cravings. You may not be insulin sensitive enough and your body may not be efficient enough at burning fats for fuel since you're cheating so much with such poor energy sources.
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #10
                    you can increase your glycogen stores by eating more protein too. it just gets difficult depending on your requirements. agree with above, get whatever carbs you need to refuel glycogen stores post workout and then you avoid the nastiness that you are trying to avoid. you could also eat them before your workout if they dont interfere with the workout itself or you dont do it too long before that you have to deal with a crash. remember though you dont HAVE to rely on post workout starch/sugar feeding to maintain adequate glycogen stores (adequate for daily function and your workouts..you dont have to have to be at limit glyco stores).

                    you are going to need to eat a LOT of beans if you want to up your glyco stores via the sources suggested. id opt for something simple like rice. weigh your options and try them all out and see what works best.

                    chocotaco369, i like that advice. my buddy did exactly the same thing and he regained sensitivity pretty quickly too. get back to "normal" before you start juggling all the starches.

                    tons of protein and lots of veggies should be enough to fuel most workouts unless you really up your activity or are under eating. i think its a bad idea to under eat and drop starches at the same time. maintain most of your calorie intake just switch the starch to protein.

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                    • #11
                      You don't want to have fat with high carb save it for low carb meals.

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                      • #12
                        Insulin is supposed to spike when you have carbs -- that's what happens to every healthy human. For that matter, protein creates an insulin response too, though you don't see anyone here saying we should be avoiding that, too. Just like the fact that just because kidney disease means you need to limit protein doesn't mean that protein causes kidney disease, a diabetic's need to avoid high GI foods doesn't mean that healthy people do too. Fructose, wheat, and excess PUFAs are the dominant causes of metabolic damage, and starches such as sweet and/or white potatoes, white rice, taro, etc are quite safe to enjoy.

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                        • #13
                          If you are concerned about an accompanying glucose spike that is both high and persistent, you might want to invest in a glucose meter and test food for yourself. I don't have a glucose meter, and so rely on hunger signals. My problem foods do not correspond very much with the GI index. I have a problem with grapefruit, oranges, chocolate, wheat of any kind, but much less of a problem with banana, white rice, granulated sucrose and squash. I generally avoid white potatoes because they aren't that good a carb bargain. Other tubers like sweet potatoes and sunchokes fall somewhere in the middle.

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                          • #14
                            AndreaReina, exactly. thanks for that post.
                            if you have good insuline sensitivity and you need the carbs you can eat them whenever you like with whatever you like.
                            i dont know why we dont talk about insuline spikes with fast digesting proteins like whey. also, high calorie ANYTHING at one sitting will give a huge insulin response, even if its just fat and protein.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by milkycereal View Post
                              oiled potatoes take longer to make and in order to lower the GI you gata stick em in the fridge and eat em cold
                              unh?
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