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  • After Breast Milk?



    My wife nurses our 10-month old daughter, but what after breast milk? CW says cow's milk, but I really don't want to start giving her milk from another species--especially cow.


    Anyone here have suggestion for alternatives? I know coconut milk has a lot of lauric acid which is very prevalent in breast milk. Not sure it is as nutrient dense. I'd be willing to also add goat milk, which I hear is better than cow's milk.


    But I'm wondering if anyone here has a completely different alternative that they've been using.


    Thanks!


  • #2
    1



    CW also says 10 months is around the time to start weaning... But toddlers still get the best nutrition from breastmilk! Of course, it's your wife's call, but here's a great link... There's a pdf version easy to print out.


    http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/ebf-benefits.html

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    • #3
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      From WAPF:

      http://www.westonaprice.org/children/index.html

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      • #4
        1



        Toddlers need a huge amount of protein relative to their small bodies, but getting them to accept and adequately chew meat can be a challenge.


        I would NOT give your child coconut milk instead of cow's milk because there is no protein in it.


        If I were in your position (and thankfully I'm not...my son is five but is not primal) I would give her whole milk that is organic. After age one most of their nutrients should be coming from whole foods, and the milk is really just a supplement, but it is important. I can't really speak to goat milk because I know nothing about it, but I know my husband was raised on goat milk without any problems because there were goats on their farm instead of milk cows.


        If you can keep your daughter's diet free of grains and processed foods, I wouldn't sweat the dairy. Just my opinion.

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        • #5
          1



          I recommend Nina Planck's "Real Food for Mother and Baby", based on WAPF principles. Just omit the grains and it's Primal.

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          • #6
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            We went with organic whole milk.

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            • #7
              1



              I like what Nourishing Traditions book by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig has to say about it. They actually go as far as suggesting feeding your kids with raw cow milk but you would have to make sure to always have it fresh and have it from a reputable cow which can be quite a challenge.

              If your wife is able, you can supplement a child's daily regiment with mother's milk up to age 2 and sometimes I've heard even longer. That will help you to safely add all kinds of new ingredients into your child's diet without risking depriving him or her of vital nutrients.

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              • #8
                1



                I'm currently nursing my 2.5 year old, and will continue until he's done. (Which means whenever he stops...) Many cultures nurse past the 3rd or 4th year, and I'd keep nursing as long as it is feasible for your wife and child. (Edited to add: Mark talks about this in the PB book--he mentions that Grok mamas would have typically nursed to age 3 or 4...)


                We are dairy free (ds is intolerant) and utilize leafy greens and bone broth for our calcium (and other) needs...We also use coconut milk a lot, b/c it's tasty and wonderful and a great replacement for milk in various dishes--but not really to replace the nutrients in dairy... If I were going to add in any other dairy, I'd go for raw, cultured goat's milk first, b/c goat's milk is easier to digest (I've read--more similar to human milk).

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                • #9
                  1



                  Is it too early to starting switching to purees or some solids? A blend of vegetables and a t-bone would be, imo, way better than cow milk.

                  “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                  "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                  "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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                  • #10
                    1



                    Tarlach would be a good resource. His kids have been Primal since conception.


                    Nina Planck (I only briefly flipped through the book) recommends feeding previously-frozen grated liver when switching to solids.

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                    • #11
                      1



                      Steve-O, does your wife have any idea when she hopes to begin actively weaning? Knowing whether she's planning to continue for 2 more months or 2 more years would make a big difference in how I'd respond.


                      Anthropologist Kathy Dettwyler's work would fit right in with the Paleo or Primal kid's diet. She's looked at age of weaning from both a cross-cultural and a cross-species (other primates) perspective. Her conclusion is that for humans, 2.5 years is probably the minimum biologically normal age to wean. Both my kids went well past that though, lol.


                      http://www.kathydettwyler.org/detwean.html

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Stephan's blog has a series on malocclusion. This is what he has to say:
                        [quote]


                        There are three main factors that I believe contribute to malocclusion in modern societies:


                        1. Maternal nutrition during the first trimester of pregnancy. Vitamin K2, found in organs, pastured dairy and eggs, is particularly important. We may also make small amounts from the K1 found in green vegetables.

                        2. Sucking habits from birth to age four. Breast feeding protects against malocclusion. Bottle feeding, pacifiers and finger sucking probably increase the risk of malocclusion. Cup feeding and orthodontic pacifiers are probably acceptable alternatives.

                        3. Food toughness. The jaws probably require stress from tough food to develop correctly. This can contribute to the widening of the dental arch until roughly age 17. Beef jerky, raw vegetables, raw fruit, tough cuts of meat and nuts are all good ways to exercise the jaws.
                        </blockquote>

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                        • #13
                          1



                          Thanks, everyone for your responses. Definitely helpful to know what others are doing and have done. Also thanks for the links.


                          My wife definitely wants to go to at least 12 months. She read that in developing countries, most go to at least 2 years. She is not opposed to going longer, it&#39;s just that she works 50 miles away, gets up before 5am to pump once, pumps 2-3 times at work, and then nurses at around 9pm. She does this 5 days a week, and she just doesn&#39;t know if she can do that for another year.


                          My feeling is that she may continue this routine because it may be even more time intensive to wean and get into a different routine, but we will need to discuss this.


                          We have also introduced about 15 oz. of daily solids (all organic and home cooked) into our child&#39;s diet. This is in addition to the 36 fl. oz. of milk she gets daily.


                          Sweet potato

                          Avocado

                          Butternut squash

                          Pear

                          Green beans

                          Dark meat chicken


                          Thanks!

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                          • #14
                            1



                            She&#39;s definitely a pumping warrior! A good thing to remember is that it doesn&#39;t have to be all or nothing... Your wife&#39;s milk supply is well-established, so even if she reduced her pumping gradually, she could continue to give some breastmilk. Even a few ounces continues to give all sorts of immune protection!

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                            • #15
                              1



                              Your food list sounds awesome! Also maybe try some mushed up egg yolks (hard boiled) with a little olive oil and salt in them.

                              Eating lots but still hungry? Eat more fat. Mid-day sluggishness? Eat more fat. Feeling depressed or irritable? Eat more fat. People think you've developed an eating disorder? Eat more fat... in front of them.

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