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  • Animal fat vs other fat



    G'day folks. Ever since learning about coconut oil, I've been using it liberally in much of my cooking. It provides me with a large portion of my daily saturated fat. In an average day, I cook with 2 to 3 tbsp of coconut oil, and 0.25 to 0.5 of a can of coconut milk.


    However, my interpretation of some articles that I've read is that animal fat is the best source of saturated fat.


    Should one curb/minimize the amount of saturated fat obtained from coconut, and focus more on saturated fat obtained from animal fat?


    Thanks!

    Nick


  • #2
    1



    Nick,


    I'm not an expert by any means. But I think the general consensus is: if you're eating grass-fed or pastured animals, then their fat is best. If eating CAFO animals---then go for as lean as possible, and supplemnt with good fats like CO.


    How'd I do, guys and gals???

    Comment


    • #3
      1



      I second Kuno.


      I personally believe that "not all saturated fats are created equal".


      Saturated fats are, by definition, made up of fatty acids with very few or no double bonds (the more multiple bonds in the molecular structure of a fatty acid, the more it can be "saturated with other atoms, hence the more "unsaturated" it becomes).


      My point is that the term "saturated fats" refers to a fat which content of fatty acids tends to be saturated. But there are many types of saturated fatty acids.


      Lard and Coconut Oil are both saturated fats but are made up of different types of saturated fatty acids.


      I believe Grok did not evolve to thrive on coconuts, but to thrive on animal fat.


      My personal take is that animal fats are better than saturated vegetable fats. The lack of animal saturated fatty acids or presence of vegetable ones could be linked to unidentified health problems.


      Take Butyric acid, for example, an animal saturated fatty acid. Recent research suggests that it prevents gut inflammation, amongst other benefits:

      http://tinyurl.com/ykf8apj


      Butyric acid is present in butter, and absent in all saturated vegetable fats.

      “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
      "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
      "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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      • #4
        1



        I definitely would NOT limit my intake of coconut fats! Even if it is a "vegetable oil", I think coconut oil plays in its very own league and has some tremendous health benefits (http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/).

        Now I wouldn't use coconut oil as your only source of saturated fat, but I really see no reason to limit it in any way, as long as your still are getting a good amount of animal fats into your diet.

        Comment


        • #5
          1



          SerialSinner, what about a Grok from the tropics? He didn't get much of animal fat. Instead, he thrived on coconuts, and did so quite successfully.

          Coconut oil contains lauric acid, capric acid and caprylic acid. The human body converts lauric acid into monolaurin which is claimed to help in dealing with viruses and bacteria causing diseases such as herpes and influenza among many others. While animal fats are also a great option for saturated fats, you will not be getting all the same benefits from animal fats exclusively.

          Your best bet would be to use multiple sources of fats in your everyday cooking. For example, I love to use coconut oil in many of the dishes, but there are some that just don't taste as good when they have a hint of coconut in them. During those times I love using lard or butter.

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          • #6
            1



            CC maybe a tropical Grok would thrive mainly on coconuts... I do worry about the specific role of the different dietary fatty acids in our physiology though. Maybe a diet high in coconut oil but "supplemented" with some sea food and fish would do it, I don't know.


            But like you said, I would also try to always keep some amount of saturated animal fat in my diet just in case.

            “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
            "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
            "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

            Comment


            • #7
              1



              Completely anecdotal, but I've gained most of the benefits of satiety of vlc by eating animal fats (pork belly, lamb cuts). Animal fats seem to be more 'naturally' satisfying than oils. While I add lots of CO and butter to food, the oils can sometimes be nauseating (and other adverse effects other PB'ers have experienced).

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              • #8
                1



                I'm eating lots of fatty CAFO meats, am I doing a lot of damage?

                ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>
                ><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>

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                • #9
                  1



                  SerialSinner, what about a Grok from the tropics?
                  Isn&#39;t Grok only from Africa? I thought that humans didn&#39;t move to other parts of the world only until recent. Even more recent did humans begin to live in tropical islands... I don&#39;t know, I might be wrong, can someone correct me?


                  I&#39;m going to start taking human evolution this semester, I can&#39;t wait!

                  ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>
                  ><((((º> ¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><(( ((º>

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                  • #10
                    1




                    I&#39;m eating lots of fatty CAFO meats, am I doing a lot of damage?

                    Not &#39;damage&#39;, but you do want to optimize your 3:6 omega ratio. With CAFO, its hard to do that.


                    So pop 1g-2g of fish oil when you CAFO meat to balance it out.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1



                      I&#39;ve been thinking about this subject at the moment as I am trying to eat more healthy fats. But I am not going to pay 30 pounds (60 dollars) for one grass fed steak.


                      Is it really as simple as having a couple pills? The 3:6 ratios according to this article are not that much of an issue:


                      http://www.themonkeyclub.org/2008/03/is-omega-6omega-3-ratio-of-beef.html


                      If we ignore the 3:6 ratio or just decide to have a few pills, aren&#39;t there other problems with CAFO meat that make it not a very healthy item to consume? I&#39;m thinking the crap they feed cows, and all the hormones, antibiotics etc they pump them full off.


                      Isn&#39;t the healthiest option just to limit red meat intake of CAFO meat and consume your saturated fat from other sources? E.g Coconut oil and butter.


                      At the moment my diet mainly consists of lots of eggs, organic free range chicken, fish (not farmed), cooked in butter, and coconut oil. I eat some red meat in the form of lamb, beef and Venison every few months. I try and eat a varied diet consuming a wide range of food depending on season. Would I really be better off consuming CAFO on a regular basis while supplementing with fish oil pills?

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                      • #12
                        1



                        Andalus, one option would be to choose the leanest CAFO meat cuts possible, and then add healthy animal fats to your meals. Butter is one possibility. You can also order grassfed tallow or lard and render them yourself. Rendering is an easy process, and unrendered fat is fairly cheap. This will cost you far less than a grass fed steak or fish oil capsules.


                        (Not saying you shouldn&#39;t take fish oil if you do this. Unless you also eat fatty fish, there&#39;s probably some benefit to supplementing fish oil.)

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                        • #13
                          1



                          Raphael,

                          You&#39;re correct. No such thing as a Pacific islander Grok. Grok is a Paleolithic animal, and didn&#39;t migrate from Africa until the end of that era. Thus, if one is strictly adhering to Paleo (instead of Primal), coconuts are out.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            They didn&#39;t get to the Pacific Islands until much later, that is true. But didn&#39;t humans start leaving Africa around 45,000-50,000 years ago? That is much earlier than the end of Paleolithic Era (around 10,000 years ago). Humans began migrating out of Africa long before the Neolithic Era began.


                            Not sure at what time period they got to the coconut producing regions, though.


                            I figure that if we eat plenty of high quality (grass fed) meats and offal, there would be no true need to use coconut oil. Either way, though, I don&#39;t see how coconut oil in the diet would be a bad thing. And, for those of us who are deficient in the good quality animal fats (most of the US, I&#39;m sure), coconut oil can be very beneficial.

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