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  • bone broth questions...

    Ok, so I'm planning out a detox to try to help me get rid of my endometriosis. I am planning on doing a green smoothie with lots of leafy greens, kelp, some low glycemic fruit, and some good fats (either avocado or egg) in the morning. I'm planning on juicing vegetables and fruit during the day, and I'm planning on having bone broth throughout.

    I want to make good thick bone broth. I want to use something like pig's feet, or something. Here's the catch. I'm poor. I've been doing ok at choosing conventional meat by choosing lean meats, and adding in healthy fats (coconut, etc) but if I want to make a broth is it going to be counter productive to make it with conventional bones? I don't even know where to LOOK for pastured bones, as all the health stores around here barely give me meat options (though they have rows of processed fake soy crap @.@)

    So I guess my question is: Is it better to make bone broth with conventionally raised bones, or not make bone broth at all?


    Crap! I'm An Adult!

    My Primal Journal

    http://badquaker.com <--- podcast I'm a part of. Check it out if you like anarchy, geekiness and random ramblings.

  • #2
    I make my broth with conventionally raised meat. From what I've always heard, the fat is what you want to avoid in conventional meat, so I don't think it'd be an issue with broth. You could remove the fat after it cools and solidifies in the fridge if it makes you feel better. I've been using neckbones, because they're pretty cheap and work well. Oxtail is where it's at (used them once and the resulting stock was like double strength Jell-o thick), but they're a little bit more expensive lately.

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    • #3
      How does a detox destroy tissue that has grown where it shouldn't?

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      • #4
        I've done broth with both organic and conventional. If you can find an organic butcher, I bet the bones would be rather cheap. I would be wary of doing pork broth or mixing bones. I've had the best luck with beef and bison and bad luck with lamb and goat.

        If you really want to stretch your money, you could start with a whole chicken (get organic if you can), use it to make broth (let it cook for about 75 minutes in the pot, take it out, let cool, strip off meat, put carcass back in pot for a few more hours, presto you have broth and still have the meat for whatever else you could use it for, a "2-fer" in my book.).

        If you are going to make beef broth, as suggested by yodiewan, you might want to avoid the bones with more fat like marrow bones for more gelatinous bones like knuckles and feet. As a compromise, you could get conventional gelatinous bones and use organic marrow bones if that's all you can find.

        Awhile back I noted US Wellness meats had a mail order special on Ebay for organic bison bones, marrow and broth type bones. I think it was very cheap, like a $1/pound, might be worth scouring for some deals on the internet.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pyro13g View Post
          How does a detox destroy tissue that has grown where it shouldn't?
          It doesn't, but it helps remove the phtyo and xeno estrogens in my body that are CAUSING the growth. I had surgery to physically remove the growths, I'm just trying to make them not grow back...


          Crap! I'm An Adult!

          My Primal Journal

          http://badquaker.com <--- podcast I'm a part of. Check it out if you like anarchy, geekiness and random ramblings.

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          • #6
            Does anyone else have trouble stomaching bone broth? For some reason I tried to make some the other day and the smell of it made me nauteous. Maybe it was the apple cider vinegar, I don't know but I couldn't eat it. I used oxtails that were very meaty so maybe that was my mistake. Maybe I'm just a wimp.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jenn View Post
              Does anyone else have trouble stomaching bone broth? For some reason I tried to make some the other day and the smell of it made me nauteous. Maybe it was the apple cider vinegar, I don't know but I couldn't eat it. I used oxtails that were very meaty so maybe that was my mistake. Maybe I'm just a wimp.
              I love the taste of bone broth, especially with a dash of salt. Only once has my bone broth smelled off when it was cooking and I think that was because I cooked the veggies too long.

              How much vinegar did you add? I think you only need a tablespoon or so for a normal-sized batch.

              Also, you don't have to eat it plain. Use it to make a deglaze the pan when cooking meat to make a sauce. Use it in soup, use it to steam veggies and pour the remaining broth over them. Lots of ways to get in your broth. Though I confess that I just eat it plain most of the time.

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              • #8
                I make pork broth and also mixed bone broths all the time, no problem.

                I think conventional bones (fat skimmed off broth at the end - just refrigerate till cold, then peel off the fat) would be fine. Organic bones are cheap, too, though.

                Oxtail is very rich in connective tissue. Other bones might be better to start with for those not used to the meatiness.

                Don't forget to add veggies! I keep my carrot tops, onion peels & ends, and wilted celery in a shoebox in the freezer for my bone broth. It really enhances the flavor. And don't forget to add unrefined sea salt at the end, for electrolytes and wonderful flavor.

                I'm trying to use broth almost anywhere a recipe calls for water. I use it to stretch marinara sauce, add it to any other sauce, etc. I need to get it in my family regularly, and it's hard to drink hot soup in the summer! I did make a wonderfully tasty (albeit hideously ugly) tongue in aspic last month that was perfect for summer. You could do it with any cut or pulled meat layered into a broth in a bowl with lemon juice, salt, and pepper stirred in, and some cut veggies layered in. Refrigerate till gelled, then turn upside onto a plate. Aspic!
                5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
                Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
                Deadlift: 240lb________________________________________Back Squat: 165lb
                Bench: 130lb__________________________________________Pre ss: 85lb
                ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

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                • #9
                  My Jewish Great Grandma BFF swears by chicken feet for making her broth. You can get them really cheaply if you have an Asian market around. She used to bring me that broth and other soups made with it when I was on chemo. Serious medicinal powers there.

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                  • #10
                    Beef feet is the best for me, it does a rich collagen broth, very good to healing and nourishing your skin. I also eat the feet leftover after.
                    But anything will do, I use all bones from my meat cuts, I do mostly beef and poultry bone broths.
                    Before starting to cook it, I added 1 or 2 lemons juice to the water and let it sit for 1 hour. Also use the traditional bronua mix of celery, onion and carrot. A little of salt at the beginning and a little of salt and the end. I do slow cooked like french for 12 to 24 hours with low heat. Rich in mineral best supplement for bones health.
                    Use to cook almost everything, specially soups.
                    Rephrasing the famous Socrates quote: "All I know is that I know nothing" and about that fact, I am still not so sure.

                    Greetings! from Jorge from Venezuela.

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                    • #11
                      How do you eat the beef feet? I have some in my freezer and was going to use them for broth, but didn't realize there'd be anything edible in there, too.

                      Do you mix the hoof broth with other broth or just make it broth on its own? The hooves are too big to put any other bones in with them, but I didn't know if it would be preferable to mix them up or not.
                      5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
                      Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
                      Deadlift: 240lb________________________________________Back Squat: 165lb
                      Bench: 130lb__________________________________________Pre ss: 85lb
                      ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MamaGrok View Post
                        I did make a wonderfully tasty (albeit hideously ugly) tongue in aspic last month that was perfect for summer. You could do it with any cut or pulled meat layered into a broth in a bowl with lemon juice, salt, and pepper stirred in, and some cut veggies layered in. Refrigerate till gelled, then turn upside onto a plate. Aspic!
                        omg, when you said "tongue in aspic" i imagined a giant cow tongue suspended in pale yellow jello. such a funny image (but delicious i'm sure).

                        to the OP, i would definitely agree that conventional bone broth is better than none at all.

                        someone else mentioned that their broth is disagreeable; i prefer a shorter simmer for mine. instead of 24+hours, i only have mine in the crockpot for 6-8. also, it's entirely possible that you've used too much vinegar. here's how i make my chicken broth:
                        after having roasted chicken for dinner, i strip the remaining meat off of the carcass for leftovers. then i crunch the chicken carcass into my crockpot, breaking bones if i feel like it. i SPRINKLE less than a few tablespoons of vinegar (usually golden balsamic) on the bones and leave it for an hour or so. then i add enough water to completely cover the bones, put on the lid, and turn it on low for 8ish hours. i usually add a few cloves of garlic, a bit of onion chunks/slices, and a few bay leaves somewhere during those hours. after cooking and letting it cool, i strain the broth (toss out the solids) and salt to taste. now it's ready for drinking, soup, or whatever. if you want to cook your stock with vegetables in it, add the veggies 2-3 hours before the stock is done.
                        my primal journal:
                        http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...Primal-Journal

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                        • #13
                          Here's a step-by-step from Maangchi. She calls this ox bone soup but it uses regular beef bones. Oxtails won't do for this soup, but I love oxtail soup - it's so beefy. If you get an off smell when boiling meat or bones, you need to add some aromatics to the broth, like dried herbs, onion, garlic, etc. If you boil oxtails, then remove the bones and refrigerate the broth, the next day you'll find a pot of waxy fat and underneath that a mass of gelatin. If you want a more refined, less fatty broth, use the recipe above.
                          Positively Radical Pigeonholes are for Pigeons!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MamaGrok View Post
                            How do you eat the beef feet? I have some in my freezer and was going to use them for broth, but didn't realize there'd be anything edible in there, too.

                            Do you mix the hoof broth with other broth or just make it broth on its own? The hooves are too big to put any other bones in with them, but I didn't know if it would be preferable to mix them up or not.
                            Ask the butcher to cut the beef feet in pieces, like to make a soup, then you get access to all the wonder.
                            Rephrasing the famous Socrates quote: "All I know is that I know nothing" and about that fact, I am still not so sure.

                            Greetings! from Jorge from Venezuela.

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