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Fermented Oats Improved my Fitness

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  • Fermented Oats Improved my Fitness

    Quick recap of my primal experience; tried it for six months, felt great at first and then crashed hard. Got sick a lot, battled a recurring sinus infection, couldn't do any intense exercise.

    Finally I upped the carbs, started eating tons of potatoes, both white and sweet, and cut back on protein. Things were looking good. I kept my weight down, I felt better, and I think I've finally banished that sinus infection. My lesson from this was, if I can plenty of carbs without ill effect whats the next step? I decided to pursue weston a. price style grain preparations. On workout days or just for some variety I've thrown in thick cut oats soaked in a water and yogurt mixture for 24 hours. The end product cooks up in about 5 minutes and I add in butter, maple syrup, cinnamon, vanilla extract, and some sea salt.

    The results were almost immediate. My workouts (nothing fancy, mark's 5 essentials) improved. I gained 2 to 3 reps in every exercise right of the bat. Previously, during a workout I would be hit by a feeling of nausea and dizziness about 3/4 of the way in and I would have to stop and lay down before completing my sets. That feeling has disappeared.

    My guess is the oats filled in the some micronutrient holes in my diet. The conclusion, grains arent evil and actually are useful in a diet. Small disclaimer though, I've never had overt or acute issues with gluten so I was able to dive in with much hesitation. I've since incorporated some sprouted sourdough(finally I can eat a sandwich again) which is actually pretty delicious.

    If your finding that primal doesn't fix all your woes, I'd seriously consider adding some fermented grains to your diet.
    "One can only be a perfect physician for oneself alone. " ~ Luigi Cornaro

  • #2
    Very interesting to hear your experience. I can imagine your feeling more energetic with adding potatoes and I do eat them from time to time. I do think some of us need more carbs than others. I find I have to limit mine or I get hungry quicker and then tend to eat more. When I started eating primal I always imagined I would go back to eating Sally Fallon, recommended, food preparation methods but I am not sure if I will now. I do have bread on rare occasion when I go out to dinner but find that it seems to be just a "butter delivery vehicle" now. The bread seems tasteless. I do like the crunch still though.

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    • #3
      Primal eating isn't necessarily low-carb, it's just about eating the right foods that we've adapted to over all this time. I've read quite a few posts on here and other sites where people feel better once they begin to eat more high-carb meals / snacks, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's brilliant that this works for you, but have you tried eating more carbs without the grains?

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      • #4
        I guess I am lucky in that I seam to be able to do very well eating primal/paleo with little to no carb laden foods. My wife is Asian, so there is a lot of rice eaten in my house and I do eat a cup of cooked mixed brown and white rice from time to time. Point is, this works for me and technically isn't strict primal or paleo. Its good that you were able to add something into your primal diet that helps you yet allows you to still be mostly primal.

        Good for you.


        And great point KG!
        www.everymanpaleo.com


        "Its not that I am too old, your music really does suck..."

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        • #5
          tel me more about this fermented oatmeal and why it is good for you?
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          • #6
            Originally posted by KG View Post
            Primal eating isn't necessarily low-carb, it's just about eating the right foods that we've adapted to over all this time. I've read quite a few posts on here and other sites where people feel better once they begin to eat more high-carb meals / snacks, and there's nothing wrong with that. It's brilliant that this works for you, but have you tried eating more carbs without the grains?
            As I said, I used a mixture of sweet and white potatoes when I first went higher carb. Roasted in plenty of butter of course

            Didn't try adding grains back in until a few months of just potatoes.
            "One can only be a perfect physician for oneself alone. " ~ Luigi Cornaro

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            • #7
              Yeah I'm sorta confused he talked about adding two things at once more carbs in the form of potatoes and oats. How do you know its the oats that was good for you and not the Potatoes/Sweet potatoes. Also you had cinnamon, butter, yogurt, and sea salt in it...maybe these helped instead.

              Also fermented implies the creation of probiotics right? Maybe you just needed to fix your gut flora which you could also do by eating other fermented things that aren't grains. I suppose if that's all the grain you eat and it doesn't cause you problems its not a big deal just sayin.
              Last edited by Raiken3712; 07-15-2011, 09:06 AM.
              Age: 28
              Height: 6'1"
              Primal start date: July 1st 2011
              Start Weight: 275
              Current Weight: 248
              Stats below as of September 1st 2011 Tested via BodPod
              Body Fat 25.4%
              Fat Mass 63.721
              Fat Free Mass 74.6%
              Fat Free Mass 187.087
              Goal weight: 180-200 lbs(Recommended weight is around 180 for my height but that sounds low)
              Total lost so far: 27 lbs

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              • #8
                Originally posted by quelsen View Post
                tel me more about this fermented oatmeal and why it is good for you?
                The bacteria involved in the fermentation process neutralizes enzyme inhibitors in grains(phytic acid) and eases the impact of gluten on your digestive system by predigesting the proteins. The vitamins and minerals present in oats are more bioavailable(particularly b vitamins).
                "One can only be a perfect physician for oneself alone. " ~ Luigi Cornaro

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Raiken3712 View Post
                  Yeah I'm sorta confused he talked about adding two things at once more carbs in the form of potatoes and oats. How do you know its the oats that was good for you and not the Potatoes/Sweet potatoes. Also you had cinnamon, butter, yogurt, and sea salt in it...maybe these helped instead.

                  Also fermented implies the creation of probiotics right? Maybe you just needed to fix your gut flora which you could also do by eating other fermented things that aren't grains. I suppose if that's all the grain you eat and it doesn't cause you problems its not a big deal just sayin.
                  Maybe I should have made it clearer in my post. The potatoes and oats were added separately. The potatoes came several months before the oats. They improved my energy and helped me get over the sinus infection but the benefits to my exercise program werent noted until adding the fermented oats. It might have been solely because of the probiotics but I have a feeling its the combo that helped. As I mentioned above, the fermentation process makes vitamins more available.
                  "One can only be a perfect physician for oneself alone. " ~ Luigi Cornaro

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                  • #10
                    That's interesting, thanks for sharing. I found I get fatigue and low mood on LC so am adding in carbs. I'm having trouble finding ones I can eat though. If I am nightshade intolerant I may also try fermented/ sprouted grains (gluten free as I am celiac) as I really need solid starches and I can't eat sweet potatoes at every meal for the rest of my life lol.
                    Gluten intolerance and hypermobility syndrome http://www.cfids.org/pdf/joint-hypermobility-guide.pdf

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Red Wire View Post
                      The bacteria involved in the fermentation process neutralizes enzyme inhibitors in grains(phytic acid) and eases the impact of gluten on your digestive system by predigesting the proteins. The vitamins and minerals present in oats are more bioavailable(particularly b vitamins).
                      If the impact needs easing, why eat it at all? There are other ways to get fiber and nutrients.

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                      • #12
                        You can also buy gluten free oats just fyi from Bob's Red Mill (and probably other gf companies). Not on the list of primal foods, but IMO better than oats that are highly cross contaminated with wheat!

                        I think its great that you are figuring out what feels best to you. I wonder if you have looked into The Perfect Health Diet. They utilize white rice as a starchy carb and otherwise follow a pretty paleo/primal WOE. May be helpful!
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                          If the impact needs easing, why eat it at all? There are other ways to get fiber and nutrients.
                          Your argument really doesn't make sense. Most foods in the human diet are similarly stressful to eat. Especially those primal/paleo approved vegetables. I'd argue that fermenting cabbage or broccoli eases the impact of its digestion. Does that devalue those foods? As far as plants go, you basically pick your poison.

                          Look at it another way, steak is easier to digest if its been slow cooked and served with broth or a fatty sauce. And you couldn't get at the nutrients in bones without the right prep work and cooking methods. Does that devalue steak or bone stock as a food? Not really. There is nothing inherently wrong with getting the most nutrition out of a food and making it easier to digest.
                          "One can only be a perfect physician for oneself alone. " ~ Luigi Cornaro

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by FairyRae View Post
                            You can also buy gluten free oats just fyi from Bob's Red Mill (and probably other gf companies). Not on the list of primal foods, but IMO better than oats that are highly cross contaminated with wheat!

                            I think its great that you are figuring out what feels best to you. I wonder if you have looked into The Perfect Health Diet. They utilize white rice as a starchy carb and otherwise follow a pretty paleo/primal WOE. May be helpful!
                            I actually just picked up a bag of Bob's oats on my way home from the shore. I hadn't realized they were gluten free at the time but I suppose thats a new plus. Thanks for the info. As for the Perfect Health Diet, from the little I've read it seems a little too focused on macro-nutrient ratios for my taste. I'm slowly but surely moving away from worrying about fat, carb, protein and just eating nutritious foods and emphasizing bio-available micronutrients.
                            "One can only be a perfect physician for oneself alone. " ~ Luigi Cornaro

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                            • #15
                              An excerpt from the MDA article "Why Grains Are Unhealthy", just in case anyone has forgotten:

                              grains have the toxic anti-nutrients, lectins, gluten, and phytates.

                              Some animals are clearly adapted to grain consumption. Birds, rodents, and some insects can deal with the anti-nutrients. Humans, however, cannot. Perhaps if grains represented a significant portion of our ancestral dietary history, things might be a bit different. Some of us can digest dairy, and we’ve got the amylase enzyme present in our saliva to break down starches if need be, but we simply do not have the wiring necessary to mitigate the harmful effects of lectins, gluten, and phytate.

                              Lectins are bad. They bind to insulin receptors, attack the stomach lining of insects, bind to human intestinal lining, and they seemingly cause leptin resistance. And leptin resistance predicts a “worsening of the features of the metabolic syndrome independently of obesity”. Fun stuff, huh?

                              Gluten might be even worse. Gluten, found in wheat, rye, and barley, is a composite of the proteins giladin and glutenin. Around 1% of the population are celiacs, people who are completely and utterly intolerant of any gluten. In celiacs, any gluten in the diet can be disastrous. We’re talking compromised calcium and vitamin D3 levels, hyperparathyroidism, bone defects. Really terrible stuff. And it gets worse: just because you’re not celiac doesn’t mean you aren’t susceptible to the ravages of gluten. As Stephan highlights, one study showed that 29% of asymptomatic (read: not celiac) people nonetheless tested positive for anti-gliadin IgA in their stool. Anti-gliadin IgA is an antibody produced by the gut, and it remains there until it’s dispatched to ward off gliadin – a primary component of gluten. Basically, the only reason anti-gliadin IgA ends up in your stool is because your body sensed an impending threat – gluten. If gluten poses no threat, the anti-gliadin IgA stays in your gut. And to think, most Americans eat this stuff on a daily basis.

                              Phytates are a problem, too, because they make minerals bio-unavailable (so much for all those healthy vitamins and minerals we need from whole grains!), thus rendering null and void the last, remaining argument for cereal grain consumption.

                              What, then, is the point to all this grain madness? Is there a good reason for anyone (with access to meat, fruit, and vegetables, that is) to rely on cereal grains for a significant portion of their caloric intake?

                              The answer is unequivocally, undeniably no. We do not need grains to survive, let alone thrive. In fact, they are naturally selected to ward off pests, whether they be insects or hominids. I suggest we take the hint and stop eating them.

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