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  • #16
    Originally posted by DubleYoo View Post
    I was wondering about store-bought sauerkraut and whether it has probiotics or whether the bacteria have all been killed.

    I assume that canned sauerkraut is all pasteurized, but what about jarred and bagged? Are they good to go with all the beneficial bacteria still intact?

    And while we're at it, any good brands you can recommend?
    Canned sauerkraut definitely won't have the bacteria. I have had Bubbi's which is good. You can get it at health food markets and they also make great pickles. Sauerkraut is very easy to make as well. I make a big batch every two to three months.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by CaliforniaGirl View Post
      Sauerkraut is very easy to make as well. I make a big batch every two to three months.
      Care to share your recipe? I'd love to make it myself.

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      • #18
        Sorry to resurrect this thread, but assuming my store bought sour kraut has the good bacteria in it (zero vinegar on label), by heating it on the stove, am I killing the potential bacteria? I know sort of a dumb question.

        I'm not sure I could stomach cold sour kraut. For those of you eating it cold, how are you eating it? Thanks!

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        • #19
          Cooking at temps in the +120F-140F and beyond will kill everything. Just put some on your plate and let it warm to room temperature before eating.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by eats.meats.west View Post
            Cooking at temps in the +120F-140F and beyond will kill everything. Just put some on your plate and let it warm to room temperature before eating.
            Thanks for the advice!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by OperaDivaMom View Post
              Most storebought sauerkraut isn't fermented at all, it's just packaged in vinegar. The only brand I know of that is fermented and isn't pasteurized is the Bubbies brand, you can find it at places like Central Market or Whole Foods in the refrigerated section. It's delicious, I highly recommend it! Their dill pickles are great too, haven't had a chance to try their kim chee yet.
              Bubbies, by law, has to "partially" pasturize their product for "shelf stability." This means that it isn't devoid of probiotics by any measure, but it won't have nearly as much probiotics as say, your local fermentation folks at the local farmer's market. It's kind of an "in-between" product as a result.

              Oh, and they make several products that ARE unfermented (their bread n' butter chips come to mind), so check the packaging before you buy.
              "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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              • #22
                Originally posted by mattp1803 View Post
                Sorry to resurrect this thread, but assuming my store bought sour kraut has the good bacteria in it (zero vinegar on label), by heating it on the stove, am I killing the potential bacteria? I know sort of a dumb question.

                I'm not sure I could stomach cold sour kraut. For those of you eating it cold, how are you eating it? Thanks!
                Zero vinegar doesn't mean probiotics. If it wasn't in the refrigerated section of the store, it's useless for probiotics. Also look for a "cloudy" brine. That cloudiness is the good bacteria floating around inside. If the brine is completely clear and you can see through it? Too bad, it's unfermented.

                And yes, cooking it kills all the good stuff. Eat fermented food raw.
                "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                  Zero vinegar doesn't mean probiotics. If it wasn't in the refrigerated section of the store, it's useless for probiotics. Also look for a "cloudy" brine. That cloudiness is the good bacteria floating around inside. If the brine is completely clear and you can see through it? Too bad, it's unfermented.

                  And yes, cooking it kills all the good stuff. Eat fermented food raw.
                  The type of sour kraut I purchased came from the grocery store (not a wholefoods or specialty store) and was in a bag, in the refrigerated section. I don't think it had the cloudiness you are talking about... wish it did.

                  Do you also recommend letting it sit at room temp until you're ready to eat? How do you prepare yours? Thanks

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                    Bubbies, by law, has to "partially" pasturize their product for "shelf stability." This means that it isn't devoid of probiotics by any measure, but it won't have nearly as much probiotics as say, your local fermentation folks at the local farmer's market. It's kind of an "in-between" product as a result.

                    Oh, and they make several products that ARE unfermented (their bread n' butter chips come to mind), so check the packaging before you buy.
                    from the website (bubbies)

                    Bubbies Sauerkraut is not raw, but it is definitely still full of good bacteria. Bubbies Sauerkraut undergoes a mild heating during packing which raises the product above the raw threshold of 118 degrees, but to no more than 135 degrees resulting a loss of approximately 10% of the active cultures that formed during the initial fermentation.

                    Our Sauerkraut is not pasteurized, which is typically the main concern of those looking for live fermented foods. Pasteurization is a sustained heating at 175 degrees or more until all biological activity is eliminated. Bubbies falls somewhere in between a raw product and a pasteurized one, and sits much closer to the raw side of the spectrum.

                    Without any heating, Bubbies Sauerkraut will continue to ferment, even in the refrigerator, resulting in bowed lids and leaking jars: a huge mess for our distributors, retailers and consumers. We still pack a 100% raw Sauerkraut, but it is only available in two-gallon food service pails which by design have enough elasticity to allow excess gas buildup from continued fermentation to escape. The production process we use on our jarred Sauerkraut allows us to bring a live, naturally fermented food full of good bacteria to market while still capturing the flavor and texture of a product that without heating could render itself unfit for sale due to leaking and or damaged packaging.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by mattp1803 View Post
                      The type of sour kraut I purchased came from the grocery store (not a wholefoods or specialty store) and was in a bag, in the refrigerated section. I don't think it had the cloudiness you are talking about... wish it did.

                      Do you also recommend letting it sit at room temp until you're ready to eat? How do you prepare yours? Thanks
                      Yeah, it's probably not the real deal then, sorry to say it! That doesn't mean it isn't still delicious as hell though.

                      Another sign, if they say they need to add a preservative to make the product last longer (look at the ingredient list) then it is not the real deal. Fermentation is, in itself, a preservation method. It's what traditional cultures would have used to preserve stuff before refrigerators became so convenient.

                      Pasteurized sauerkraut gets a pass in my book as still good because it was at one point, fermented before being pasturized. The fermentation process increases the bioavailability of B-vitamins in foods and that stays even after it's pasturized. So it may not have the probiotic benefits, but there are other benefits to such foods.

                      How to prepare the real stuff though? Open jar, insert fork, and nom.

                      A side of cold sauerkraut next to my hot meat or fish entre is a GREAT contrast. If you can't stand it cold though, just do as others have said and wait a bit for the 'kraut or pickles or whatever to get to room temperature. If it's really fermented stuff then being out of the fridge for a few moments won't hurt it at all.
                      "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                        Yeah, it's probably not the real deal then, sorry to say it! That doesn't mean it isn't still delicious as hell though.

                        Another sign, if they say they need to add a preservative to make the product last longer (look at the ingredient list) then it is not the real deal. Fermentation is, in itself, a preservation method. It's what traditional cultures would have used to preserve stuff before refrigerators became so convenient.

                        Pasteurized sauerkraut gets a pass in my book as still good because it was at one point, fermented before being pasturized. The fermentation process increases the bioavailability of B-vitamins in foods and that stays even after it's pasturized. So it may not have the probiotic benefits, but there are other benefits to such foods.

                        How to prepare the real stuff though? Open jar, insert fork, and nom.

                        A side of cold sauerkraut next to my hot meat or fish entre is a GREAT contrast. If you can't stand it cold though, just do as others have said and wait a bit for the 'kraut or pickles or whatever to get to room temperature. If it's really fermented stuff then being out of the fridge for a few moments won't hurt it at all.
                        Thanks for the advice!!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by mattp1803 View Post
                          Thanks for the advice!!
                          As a little sauerkraut hack, once the jar gets down a little and you have some room (and plenty of brine left), add your own veggies to the kraut and let it sit for a few days. They'll ferment along with the 'kraut and give you plenty of interesting variations. 'Kraut and jalapeņos. Now THAT'S good stuff.
                          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Making your own sauerkraut is super easy and super cheap.

                            How To Make Homemade Sauerkraut in a Mason Jar Cooking Lessons from The Kitchn | The Kitchn
                            Making Sauerkraut | Wild Fermentation :: Wild Fermentation

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                            • #29
                              This....seriously. Once you've made one good batch you'll wonder why you even bothered with anything else. Plus its pennies on the dollar. I see jars of this homemade stuff at farmers markets from 9-11$ a jar! I can make about 6 jars worth at home for about 5 bucks and they will last me months before I gotta make a new batch.

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                              • #30
                                FDA Sauerkraut Definition, use of name on label requires fermentation.

                                CPG Sec. 585.750 Sauerkraut - Definition; Adulteration by Thrips

                                BACKGROUND:
                                Food Inspection Decision (F.I.D.) 196, issued August 1925, defined sauerkraut. Since that time the definition, essentially unchanged through the revision that appeared in Service and Regulatory Announcements (S.R.A.) F.D. No. 2, Rev. 5, November 1936, has been used as a guide for officials in enforcing the Food and Drug Act of 1906 and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938. The definition follows:

                                Sauerkraut: The product, of characteristic acid flavor, obtained by the full fermentation, chiefly lactic, of properly prepared and shredded cabbage in the presence of not less than 2 percent nor more than 3 percent of salt. It contains, upon completion of the fermentation, not less than 1.5 percent of acid, expressed as lactic acid. Sauerkraut which has been rebrined in the process of canning or repacking, contains not less than 1 percent of acid, expressed as lactic acid.

                                Shortly after enactment of the 1938 Act, sauerkraut was among the foods exempted from label declaration of ingredients requirement for labeling of nonstandardized foods. The exemption was based on the expectation that standards would soon be established. However, standards for this product were not established and on September 17, 1959, the exemption was terminated.

                                POLICY:

                                In the absence of a standard of identity, the term “sauerkraut” is considered the common or usual name for a product obtained by the lactic acid fermentation of cabbage in the presence of salt. Products which have not been fermented, but owe their acidity to added vinegar, acetic acid or other acidifiers are not entitled to the name sauerkraut. Ingredients of sauerkraut must be listed on the label by their common or usual name in descending order of predominance.

                                REGULATORY ACTION GUIDANCE:

                                Adulteration by Thrips

                                The following represents criteria for recommending legal action to CFSAN/Office of *Compliance*/Division of Enforcement (HFS-605):

                                The sauerkraut exceeds an average of 50 thrips per 100 grams.

                                *Material between asterisks is new or revised*

                                Issued: 8/24/70

                                Revised: 8/23/73

                                Reissued: 10/1/80

                                Revised: 8/15/82

                                Reissued: 12/8/88

                                Revised: 3/95, 5/2005

                                Updated: 11/29/05

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