Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Review article on milk as a promoter of "Western diseases"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Review article on milk as a promoter of "Western diseases"

    http://www.canibaisereis.com/downloa...c-diseases.pdf

  • #2
    I support this message.

    Comment


    • #3
      Very well written. I was particularly interested in the section about pre-natal exposure to cow's milk (from the pregnant woman drinking it) can cause an increased risk of breast cancer later in life.
      I like that Mark does not take a hard and fast stance on this, allowing people to make up their own minds. But for me it just makes intuitive sense. Milk is designed to be for a specific phase in life. Just because your ancestors gave you the genetic mutation that allows you to consume it without any major ill effects that are apparent, doesn't mean that it is beneficial or even really safe to do so in the long run.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
        Milk is designed to be for a specific phase in life.
        What are carrots designed for? Or anchovies?

        Milk is one of the very few foods that's designed to be a food. The fact that its target audience is limited does not put it behind the 99% of foods that have no target audience at all.

        Milk may be good or it may be bad; but the fact that it's not specifically designed for adults tells us nothing about the answer either way. Because neither is anything else.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by maurile View Post
          What are carrots designed for? Or anchovies?

          Milk is one of the very few foods that's designed to be a food. The fact that its target audience is limited does not put it behind the 99% of foods that have no target audience at all.

          Milk may be good or it may be bad; but the fact that it's not specifically designed for adults tells us nothing about the answer either way. Because neither is anything else.
          Actually, no.

          Carrots and anchovies and all the things humans evolved eating are just there. Nature worked it out.

          Milk is unique. It's found in mammal females and is there to provide what a growing young mammal needs for a finite period of time. Milk is not a carrot or anchovy that is in the ground or swimming around that any other creature just comes along and consumes. Evolution happened with milk as a temporary source of nutrition.

          Milk pretty much entered the human diet when animals were domesticated. That's not Primal. Today it gets separated, skimmed, pasteurized, and sometimes contaminated with hormones.

          I quit because my doctor was insistent. I was in his office for insulin resistance, thyroid, and adrenal fatigue. Exact quote from my doc, "milk is poison, for YOU."

          That doesn't apply to everyone else, but it's not like I'm the only one either.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DFH View Post
            Milk is unique. It's found in mammal females and is there to provide what a growing young mammal needs for a finite period of time.
            Chicken egg yolks are unique. They're found in chicken eggs and are there to provide what a growing chicken fetus needs for a finite period of time.

            That doesn't make them a bad food for adult humans. Milk and egg yolks have to be evaluated according to their nutritional content and their effects on human metabolism, not according to the target audience they were originally designed for.

            There's some evidence that milk is harmful (and some evidence that it's healthful — at least the full-fat, raw, grass-fed variety). But either way it has nothing to do with the fact that it wasn't specifically designed for adult humans. That's all I'm saying.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah but you could argue that Grok and Co likely evolved gathering eggs too. They would have been easier to get than following some mammal around with a coconut shell going "stand still Bessie..."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DFH View Post
                Yeah but you could argue that Grok and Co likely evolved gathering eggs too.
                Sure. One could also argue that eggs contain more choline, lutein, and zeaxanthin than milk does. Those arguments are entirely distinct from the only argument I was criticizing: namely, the vegan-sounding quip that milk is designed for baby cows rather than for adult humans.

                They would have been easier to get than following some mammal around with a coconut shell going "stand still Bessie..."
                I'm not sure to what extent that's true. There are non-agricultural nomads in Asia that milk wild horses. It takes some skill and technique, but no more skill or technique than effectively hunting various types of wild game.
                Last edited by maurile; 06-16-2011, 08:32 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, people tended to eat anything that didn't eat them first, so I'm not sure about that argument. Some people deal with milk well--some don't. I have milk issues, but I've learned that raw milk and cheese work for me (so far anyway), and that fermenting milk makes it pretty edible for adults around the world. It's no coincidence that many cultures around the world consume soured milk products--there must be a reason.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by maurile View Post
                    I'm not sure to what extent that's true. There are non-agricultural nomads in Asia that milk wild horses. It takes some skill and technique, but no more skill or technique than effectively hunting various types of wild game.
                    Um, no again. Those nomads have domesticated horses. Trying to grab a wild horse's ta tas would be a good way to get kicked in the face. Not worth it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by maurile View Post
                      Sure. One could also argue that eggs contain more choline, lutein, and zeaxanthin than milk does. Those arguments are entirely distinct from the only argument I was criticizing: namely, the vegan-sounding quip that milk is designed for baby cows rather than for adult humans.



                      I'm not sure to what extent that's true. There are non-agricultural nomads in Asia that milk wild horses. It takes some skill and technique, but no more skill or technique than effectively hunting various types of wild game.

                      Horses were domesticated after the paleolithic era I think. Also, Masai tribe drink large quantities of milk and they seem to do fine (they also have plaque buildup in arteries just like everyone else).

                      Maybe physical activity and the fact that they are fit to begin with means they can consume large quantities of milk.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                        Um, no again. Those nomads have domesticated horses. Trying to grab a wild horse's ta tas would be a good way to get kicked in the face. Not worth it.
                        Um, no. They ride their domesticated horses to round up wild horses, and they milk the wild horses — horses that, before being milked, had never been touched by human hands. See The Human Planet. The grasslands episode. It's all on film, and it's pretty cool.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by maurile View Post
                          Um, no. They ride their domesticated horses to round up wild horses, and they milk the wild horses — horses that, before being milked, had never been touched by human hands. See The Human Planet. The grasslands episode. It's all on film, and it's pretty cool.
                          But even if that does happen now, Grok didn't have domesticated horses to do the rounding up with. Wild horses don't stand still unless they are confined. Like DFH said, running after it with a coconut shell asking it politely to hold still wouldn't really work. So I don't think Grok drank milk after weaning.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm with maurile - just show the evidence that it's bad for people today, if you've got it. "Grok did / didn't do X" is only what you fall back on when you don't have a clue whether something is good for you or not. It's a just-so argument that you could use to justify any bullshit you want. Don't confuse Mark's marketing pitch with good science. Usually, they coincide, but they are NOT the same thing.
                            If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe you should keep in mind that a high protein diet per se increases igf 1 levels regardless of the source. So if cancer prevention is one of your main dietary goals you should rethink the 1,5 g protein/pound of bodyweight...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X