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How much honey did Grok have?

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  • How much honey did Grok have?

    I know what I'd have done if I was Grok - kept in mind where the hives are, perhaps made a little map on some stone wall - and then wait for the bees to die off and then round them all up! Yum!

    So my thoughts are, quite a bit - but obviously just seasonally. What do you think?

    (I doubt Grok went for active hives - I doubt even Grok was that brave! Unless he used smoke.)
    :-)

  • #2
    From what I've seen on nature shows, because harvesting honey is very labor intensive, when honey was harvested it was usually a special event involving a gorging....other than that: absolutely none.
    carl's cave

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    • #3
      Here is a hunter gatherer tribal person trying to obtain honey for his family. It's a great video and it shows how dangerous it might possibly be to obtain honey. If it was this hard for a normal westerner to obtain sugar they might think twice about it or at least they would burn off some calories and use some muscles in the process. Instead of just getting in your car and driving to a grocery store for honey. Enjoy. So I have to agree with carlh.

      YouTube - ‪Facing angry bees 40 metres high and unattached for honey - Human Planet: Jungles, preview - BBC One‬‏
      "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

      People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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      • #4
        Grok probably had syrup, too. From the trees.

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        • #5
          I doubt the tree thing. I have sugar maples and sap does not naturally run out of them

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ast View Post
            I know what I'd have done if I was Grok - kept in mind where the hives are, perhaps made a little map on some stone wall - and then wait for the bees to die off and then round them all up! Yum!

            So my thoughts are, quite a bit - but obviously just seasonally. What do you think?

            (I doubt Grok went for active hives - I doubt even Grok was that brave! Unless he used smoke.)
            Possibly quite a lot. Some modern hunter-gatherers apparently use quite a lot of it when it's available. I've seen film of Hadza eating it by the handful.

            And consumption of honey goes right back. Even non-human primates eat it, so I'd guess humans always have. I'd guess it's OK in moderation, but as with a lot of foodstuffs what you can buy isn't quite what you'd get in the wild. I think most of it pasteurized, and it's possible the heat is damaging to it and may change its properties.

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            • #7
              i count the total carb thing per day and try to stay under 100 grams. unless i'm going for a long bike ride and don't care 'bout the nutrients.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lewis View Post
                Possibly quite a lot. Some modern hunter-gatherers apparently use quite a lot of it when it's available. I've seen film of Hadza eating it by the handful.
                Yeah but that's the thing - when they had it they had a lot. But they rarely had it. They'd bust open whole hives and scoop it out. If they did that all the time the bees would leave the area.
                carl's cave

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                • #9
                  How often did the same grok person find honey in the actual wild? I doubt they would look for honey, probably find it by accident (rarely) when hunting for animals.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mwok86 View Post
                    How often did the same grok person find honey in the actual wild? I doubt they would look for honey, probably find it by accident (rarely) when hunting for animals.
                    Would they look for it or just come across it? I don't know. They certainly prize it. The Bushmen are said to have risked death to get it—meaning, IIRC, they'd climb to dangerous places to get it, or go into areas where they could meet people hostile to them.

                    The Bushmen are also said, fascinatingly, to cooperate with birds and animals in finding and getting it. This would mean the ratel (or honey badger) and the honeyguide bird.

                    The honeyguide bird finds the bees' nest and then finds, and chatters loudly at, the honey badger, looking back and making sure it's following, as it flies back to the bees' nest. The badger can break the nest open, which the bee couldn't, but there'll be some left for the bird after the badger's eaten it's fill.

                    I think the bird will sometimes attract the attention of Bushmen, so that they do similarly.

                    It's been claimed there used to sometimes be a three-way cooperation between bird, badger and man. The bird calls the man and the badger; the man lets the badger and the bird have some, and all creatures are pleased. Laurens van der Post certainly said this happened, but then he liked to tell delightful stories and didn't always tell the truth. It doesn't sound completely implausible, and I'm sure the Bushmen were very in-touch with their surroundings and could maintain some quite complex relationship with non-domesticated animals if anyone could. After all, even the bird and the badger can handle cooperation of some sort.

                    It's also been said that if a Bushman found a good source of honey, he would mark the tree, and then other Bushmen would recognize his rights in it and leave it alone.

                    But I'm not suggesting anyone need eat honey or that what we can normally buy is like what's in the wild.

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                    • #11
                      I have a theory.

                      You know that sweet tooth we get? It's for honey. Why? Because honey has natural antibacterial properties and some honey, such as Manuka is even powerful enough to kill MRSA.

                      I discovered Manuka honey recently and I gauged on about three jars! After that I didn't feel like it much, but have continued to have one spoonful with meals. I no longer feel hungry all the time, too!
                      :-)

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                      • #12
                        I think we have a sweet tooth because to help with determining how safe food is (although almond and peach scents mean poison). I also think people from early times would have known their territory quite well and known where hives and sweet fruit and other foods were located and when they could get them. If you are careful, you can harvest wild honey pretty regularly. You don't need tons of people or have to wipe out the bees and their hive and make it life threatening - just take a piece and leave the queen alone.
                        Evolutionary. Ideology that fits biology

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                        • #13
                          I don't usually have any honey but lately this week have been having some in herbal tea with lemon for my sore throat from the flu.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lewis View Post
                            The Bushmen are also said, fascinatingly, to cooperate with birds and animals in finding and getting it. This would mean the ratel (or honey badger) and the honeyguide bird.

                            The honeyguide bird finds the bees' nest and then finds, and chatters loudly at, the honey badger, looking back and making sure it's following, as it flies back to the bees' nest. The badger can break the nest open, which the bee couldn't, but there'll be some left for the bird after the badger's eaten it's fill.

                            I think the bird will sometimes attract the attention of Bushmen, so that they do similarly.
                            Here's an interesting video of the Maasai communicating with birds to find honey. They leave some honey for the birds, saying that if they don't then they'll be lead to a lion's den next time around.

                            YouTube - ‪BBC - Human Planet - Honey Guide Bird‬‏

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ast View Post
                              I have a theory. You know that sweet tooth we get? It's for honey.
                              I'm pretty sure we have a sweet tooth as part of our larger drive to seek foods rich in antioxidants and calories, including fruit, and also as part of checking food safety like Avelin said. I wouldn't assume it's JUST for honey.
                              "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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