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Heavy cream counts as fat not dairy, right?

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  • Heavy cream counts as fat not dairy, right?

    I'm trying to lose a little fat and have cut out dairy in an attempt to lose more than the one pound a week I've been losing. Do I have to count the heavy cream I put in my coffee as dairy? How does it metabolize...as dairy or just regular fat? TIA

  • #2
    Depends on how sensitive you are to dairy.

    If you do HWC, avoid the HWC with mono and diglycerides(=trans fats made from soybean oil that fall outside the requirement for trans-fat labeling!) and polysorbate 80(made from corn oil). I don't worry about carrageenan, it's basically seaweed.

    Gordo

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    • #3
      If you do fine with dairy, by all means use Heavy Cream! I second the last poster. Try to find an organic source, with no additives or preservatives. My local supermarket sells Organic Vally Heavy Cream. Just Milk/Cream.

      Heavy Creams fall under full-fat dairy.
      Last edited by Zed; 06-05-2011, 04:52 PM.

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      • #4
        Interesting... the only organic valley I can find is organic ultra-pasteurized and it has carrageenan in it. I looked at the website and there is also one that is just pasteurized and doesn't have carrageenan. I wonder why that is.
        Organic Valley - Organic Heavy Whipping Cream

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        • #5
          Trader Joe's sells pure heavy whipping cream where the only ingredient is "cream". That's what I buy. Plus, it's pasteurized, not ultra-pasteurized, so it doesn't taste burnt and you can whip it into your own butter after souring it with buttermilk for a day or two. It's the same price as the ultra-pasteurized junk at Shop Rite with 9 ingredients in it or however many additives it has.
          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by healthy11 View Post
            Interesting... the only organic valley I can find is organic ultra-pasteurized and it has carrageenan in it. I looked at the website and there is also one that is just pasteurized and doesn't have carrageenan. I wonder why that is.
            Organic Valley - Organic Heavy Whipping Cream
            The former has a longer self-life. But even with regular heavy cream (the latter), it can be "good" well after the expiration date (the amount of fat, minus sugar/carbs, allows it to more stable).

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            • #7
              This is unequivocally one of the most inane questions I have ever heard in my life.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mm84321 View Post
                This is unequivocally one of the most inane questions I have ever heard in my life.

                Why? I'm asking how it's metabolized and if it's different because it's milk? Your answer is not helpful....I don't mind that you think it's a dumb question (although I would have preferred a slightly less caustic response), just that you didn't explain why. I'm new at this and trying to learn.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by healthy11 View Post
                  Interesting... the only organic valley I can find is organic ultra-pasteurized and it has carrageenan in it.
                  The pints which I get at my corner health-food store have carrageenan in them. The half-gallons which Whole Foods used to carry were just cream. It had little dots of yellow butterfat in it. Yum. I'm bummed about the half-gallons going away. Whole Foods loses, though, that was my main motivation for making the drive across town and then once I was there, I'd generally drop $50.

                  Gordo

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                  • #10
                    Mine says it contains cream, sodium citrate (salt?), and carrageenan. Good enough?

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                    • #11
                      No F-ing thickeners! Double cream, that's what you want. Fortunately Australia, with an English heritage, has double cream. 51% milk fat! None of that 37% fat 'heavy' cream
                      "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mm84321 View Post
                        This is unequivocally one of the most inane questions I have ever heard in my life.
                        Had to laugh when I went to look at your profile to see where your special ray-of-sunshine personality comes from, and saw this:
                        "mm84321 has not made any friends yet"....
                        Liz.

                        Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
                        Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mm84321 View Post
                          This is unequivocally one of the most inane questions I have ever heard in my life.
                          This is unequivocally one of the most inane comments I have ever heard (though, technically, read) in my life.
                          Warning: I'm the most laid-back primal gal you'll ever meet.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Doddibot View Post
                            No F-ing thickeners! Double cream, that's what you want. Fortunately Australia, with an English heritage, has double cream. 51% milk fat! None of that 37% fat 'heavy' cream
                            Double cream! I'm jealous. The nasty additives are emulsifiers, not thickeners. Triglycerides from which one or two fat molecules has been stripped. One end is hydrophilic and the other hydrophobic. Apparently, labeling laws for trans fats only apply to triglycerides. Watch your labels for mono or diglycerides, it's a sneaky way to include trans fats without having to admit it.

                            Gordo

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                            • #15
                              Being that 60%+ of heavy cream is not fat, I count it as dairy. Have you tried coconut milk or cream in your coffee? I like it so much better than dairy cream.

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