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A warning about shop-bought lard

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  • A warning about shop-bought lard



    I've been going primal for a few weeks now and at first I felt fantastic. I've always had digestive issues and a severe wheat intolerance, but my bowels felt better than they had for ages. Then it all went downhill and I ended up with terrible pains in my stomach and chronic diahorrea. I couldn't believe that a diet which I truly believed to be healthy could do this to me. I started wondering if I needed to go back to the potatoes!


    The only change I'd made during those few weeks was starting to cook with lard. I found it hard to believe this was the cause, but decided just to check. The ingredients said: Lard; antioxidant (natural tocopherols). What are tocopherols? Vitamin E. And what is the most common source of Vit E? I looked it up... wheat germ!


    I'm now off the lard and waiting to see if tummy improves. Next time I'll render my own!


    Not everybody will be as sensitive to wheat as I am, but for anybody out there who can't understand why this wonderful diet isn't resolving tummy issues... this is for you.


  • #2
    1



    I was thinking I had read that tocopherols in products was generally soy derived. As with new FDA laws if it is actually from wheat it should be listed as such, of course all gluten doesn't but wheat does.

    Mama to 4, wife to my love

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    • #3
      1



      Looked it up again and it does say that it is a maybe ingredient. We use tallow here that I bought from US Wellness(grassfed) and have some as well that I got from the partial cow I just bought that I need to render. The tallow from US Wellness is a very good price for the 5 gal size- 100-$108 w/ shipping which is about $22 a gallon- for good grassfed tallow.

      Mama to 4, wife to my love

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      • #4
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        That's interesting about FDA rules - I'm in the UK and there is no obligation to state the sources of those types of derivatives over here.

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        • #5
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          And of course both wheat and soy can cause GI problems.

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          • #6
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            Oh, sorry I didn't even think about the different countries aspect. AS I have read w/ celiac different additives are derived from different sources in other countries and what might be safe one place wouldn't necessarily in another. All of which makes it oh so fun when you have to restrict foods- and you are right soy and wheat can both cause problems. Me and the kids cannot have gluten and my daughter also has horrible problems w/ soy as well.

            Mama to 4, wife to my love

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            • #7
              1



              commercial lard is often hydrogenized too.

              It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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              • #8
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                Yeah, I didn't realise about the hydrogenisation when I first bought it.

                Soror - do you think these probs are hereditary? My two-year-old has coeliac disease but my other child shows no signs as yet. But I bet when she gets to her 20s it will hit her.

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                • #9
                  1



                  I think there is certainly a hereditary component, but as to why it expresses in some and not others I think there can be a million different reasons. I hope that with my kids anyway that their other intolerances(neither can tolerate dairy either) are secondary to the damage created from the gluten and once we heal from that they "get" other foods back.

                  Mama to 4, wife to my love

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                  • #10
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                    I think that may well happen - I've never been able to go back to eating wheat but have been able to start eating other foods, such as tomatoes, which used to upset me.

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                    • #11
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                      Would a vitamin (in this case E) taken from a particular source maintain the source's allergenic properties?

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                      • #12
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                        All the grocery store lard I've ever seen (USA) has some BHTA in it, that's all.


                        Given a choice between some infinitesimal BHTA and cooking in "vegetable" oils, it's a no brainer.


                        Not ideal, but a step up.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          Armour Lard is what I see in the store around here. Here is what is in it:


                          Lard and Hydrogenated Lard, Bha, Propyl Gallate and Citric Acid Added to Protect Flavor.


                          The hydrogenated lard scares me. I'll do butter instead.

                          It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Maybe it's different in the UK and US. Citric acid is generally made from wheat and would definitely upset my stomach, but my husband (gluten intolerant rather than wheat intolerant) can eat it no probs.

                            BTW does anyone know if commercial beef dripping is hydrogenated?

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                            • #15
                              1



                              I really, really doubt that wheat is the origin of any citric acid. Besides being a component of so much in nature, here is what WP has to say on current manufacturing techniques:


                              "In 1893, C. Wehmer discovered that Penicillium mold could produce citric acid from sugar. However, microbial production of citric acid did not become industrially important until World War I disrupted Italian citrus exports. In 1917, the American food chemist James Currie discovered that certain strains of the mold Aspergillus niger could be efficient citric acid producers, and Pfizer began industrial-level production using this technique two years later, followed by Citrique Belge in 1929.


                              In this production technique, which is still the major industrial route to citric acid used today, cultures of Aspergillus niger are fed on a sucrose or glucose-containing medium to produce citric acid. The source of sugar is corn steep liquor, molasses, hydrolyzed corn starch or other inexpensive sugary solutions.[9] After the mould is filtered out of the resulting solution, citric acid is isolated by precipitating it with lime (calcium hydroxide) to yield calcium citrate salt, from which citric acid is regenerated by treatment with sulfuric acid."


                              Wheat is not an inexpensive source of sugar because it has none.

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