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Primal Blueprint v's Nourishing Traditional Diets

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  • Primal Blueprint v's Nourishing Traditional Diets

    Hi all,

    I found this website because I read Sally fallon's / Westin A Price, book Nourishing Traditional Diets - which really struck a chord with me.

    My question is: how much does the food aspect of Primal Blueprint differ from, or agree with Westin Prices' findings. (And remember I'm just talking about the food aspect here.)

    From what I can understand... Westin Price showed that people around the world ate different diets (some purely animal, some a lot more vegetable) but one thing that they all seemed to have in common were the animal fats, offal meats, sacred foods, fermented foods...

    I understand that the PB food is slightly different?

    Can anyone sum up the differences for me?

    thanks.
    SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
    “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

  • #2
    The main difference is that NT includes grains and some legumes I think, but only if they've been soaked, sprouted, soured, or otherwise properly prepared.

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    • #3
      That's my impression, as well. I also think WP endorses raw milk rather fervently. That said, WP himself does not seem to have viewed flesh protein as key. He claimed to have found multiple examples of people with generally excellent physical development (esp. "facial development," which he claimed to see everywhere in primitive peoples in a way that completely escapes me) among cultures that consumed little meat (e.g., the people of the Outer Hebrides, who supposedly ate meat only about once a week). My impression is that he did not see much if any difference between the physical development of primitive and traditional agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers, and did not find the "diseases of civilization" in either group. I'm skeptical.

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      • #4
        A friend of mine talked me into buying NT and I think it's mostly reasonable and Primal.

        There is a lot of talk in it about fermenting and cultures, and these are used to encourage ways to make whole grains "acceptable."

        Both NT and PB steer you away from processed carbs and Frankenfood.

        I thought NT was a good read and a little heavy on the rhetoric- "Fight the Diet Dictocrats, etc." I don't think I will be turning my place into a Zombucha brewery.

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        • #5
          Thanks for bringing up this topic! Hopefully more knowledgeable posters will tune in and discuss it in further detail.

          I have to say that thanks to you I was inspired to watch this 2-hour lecture today: Nourishing Traditional Diets - The Key to Vibrant Health 01 : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive. I had read Nourishing Traditions, but this whole lecture has loads of material different from that book, so it was very informative and interesting.

          I love Sally Fallon's attitude -- she seems to be another person full of passion for nutrition and health, and I just love it. I also share her philosophy a lot, although I'm probably a bit more restrictive of grains in general. I love the point she makes: There is no such thing as one true healthy diet. People have eaten different types of food all around the work, but the healthiest people have always eaten whole minimally processed foods. (I also love that she doesn't think highly of protein powders, which I just can't stand.)

          But yeah, it seems that for Nourishing Traditions, all foods that the nature can produce are healthy if prepared properly.

          By the way, since I was so inspired by her talk, I wanted to get more of her. I found this amazing website that is full of beautiful information: The Weston A. Price Foundation

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          • #6
            From reading Mark's books and posts, I think he would say why go through all the trouble to soak and ferment to wind up with food that is still carb dense and nutrient weak? Personally, I eat some white rice, corn tortillas and soaked beans. I don't soak the beans. I buy Eden Foods products.

            It is impressive how people have found ways to make non-paleo foods digestible.
            Ancestral Health Info

            I design websites and blogs for a living. If you would like a blog or website designed by someone who understands Primal, see my web page.

            Primal Blueprint Explorer My blog for people who are not into the Grok thing. Since starting the blog, I have moved close to being Archevore instead of Primal. But Mark's Daily Apple is still the best source of information about living an ancestral lifestyle.

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            • #7
              I think that's a very good point. I think the only arguments for it would be variety, taste, and cost. Maybe it's fun for some people too, sort of like gardening or something.

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              • #8
                For anyone who's read it, would it be a good book to give to non-paleo friends as sort of a "gateway" book? Implant some suggestions rather than freak them the fuck out right off the bat?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DarthFriendly View Post
                  For anyone who's read it, would it be a good book to give to non-paleo friends as sort of a "gateway" book? Implant some suggestions rather than freak them the fuck out right off the bat?
                  You know what? Something like this: http://westonaprice.org/images/pdfs/...y4life2011.pdf would be incredible to begin with.

                  But Nourishing Traditions is incredible for everyone in my opinion.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vishal2100
                    if you compressed human civilization into just 1 WHOLE year people have been eating grains since yesterday meaning that these 'traditional' nourishing diets are relatively new since our existence - this was from fat head
                    Good one. I noticed that too. "Traditional" in NT means post hunter-gatherer and Paleo/Primal means hunter-gatherer. NT goes out of its way to make agricultural era foods more acceptable, as opposed to mass-processed.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Risto View Post
                      You know what? Something like this: http://westonaprice.org/images/pdfs/...y4life2011.pdf would be incredible to begin with.

                      But Nourishing Traditions is incredible for everyone in my opinion.
                      Thanks for that link!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Risto View Post
                        You know what? Something like this: http://westonaprice.org/images/pdfs/...y4life2011.pdf would be incredible to begin with.

                        But Nourishing Traditions is incredible for everyone in my opinion.
                        I'm surprised that a lot of the recipes have white flour

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by healthy11 View Post
                          I'm surprised that a lot of the recipes have white flour
                          I'm surprised too. She's actually against white flour, so I'm not sure what is up with that. But I just ignored that part.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the input everyone. And yes, I would wholeheartedly recommend giving the DVD to someone who is new to all this. (or pass on the link, I also downloaded it from the torrents, for free... shhh!

                            The only negative about it for someone who might not be interested in nutrition is that it's long... (for me it didn't matter becuase I was hooked - but I couldn't get my bf to stay long enough to watch it all). It's a very interesting presentation. And if you're new to all this 'caveman' stuff, like I am - it can open your eyes.

                            It was through watching that that I ended up here. Straight after, I made my first bone broth soup, and bought my first ever organic butter! I just this minute fried a free-range egg in it too - and I have to say it was probably the most devine thing I have tasted!!! No more vegetable oils for me! LOL

                            I will take a look at that link Risto, so thanks for that. Not sure why they would use white flour though - maybe in small amounts it's a trade off? (If the recipie has fats and organ meats and the like, maybe a little white flour won't hurt...?) The last thing I want is to become a food nazi, (I have enough vegan friends doing that and it's no fun!) and obviously I have been eating processed wheat for near on 40 years, so a half a cup or so... once a week, wouldn't hurt, right? especially if the rest of my diet is A+

                            Thanks DFH, that makes sense.

                            So fermentaion and grains are the biggest difference in PB and NT. OK, time to get my head around that one...

                            I've always thought that grains were 'natural' (therefore good for you). Of course, the more I read the more I find out that that might not be the case. I'm thinking that grains were in fact the first 'convinience foods'. Once our ancestors learnt how to process them, they could be made into 'new products' like bread, that could be stored/carried for extended periods. Sounds like our modern day convineince food was born!

                            The thing I have found previously, is that I didn't seem to have as much energy when I cut out grain products from my diet completely. (I must admit though, that I replaced the lost calories with lean protein and vegetables, NOT FAT...) which might be the reason why when I did a work out at the gym I had zero energy? Has anyone else found this?

                            I think dairy has merits, but it must be RAW. I can't see how pasterization or homoginization does any good to the nutritional content and that being the case I am trying to stay away from cows milk and cheese, and trying to replace it instead with goats products. Unfortunately neither are available here RAW, so, it's a trade off... I just feel that maybe goat products has slightly more nutrients than cows? I might be wrong on that one.

                            And on the fermented foods - I have found kimchi in the supermarket, at at some Japanese stores, but I have no idea if this is 'natural' or pasterised or whatever. Does anyone know if store bought kimchi is good? Or should I try to make my own.

                            NT does have an easy sourcraut recipe (that I haven't tried to make yet) - again, doubt that Grok would have been making fermented foods, but the first reference to kimchi is thought ot be around 3000 years ago... so quite a while back. Does any one know what 'time period' this would have been? long, long, long after hunter gatheres?

                            I know Koreans who swear by the digestive properties of kimchi, so it may help with my digestive issues. I'ven ever been a real fan - far too hot and spicy for me - which leads me to another question...

                            Would grok have eaten spicy food? would he have discovered or known about spices/herbs and used them for flavour or medicine? does anyone know?
                            SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
                            “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DarthFriendly View Post
                              For anyone who's read it, would it be a good book to give to non-paleo friends as sort of a "gateway" book? Implant some suggestions rather than freak them the fuck out right off the bat?
                              Eating the way the NT suggests is very labour and time intensive. Soaking and fermenting takes preparation and planning and time. There is very little that can be made in less than a day. At least with paleo you can tell people "cook a steak, eat it with some vegies." It's quick and easy.

                              I don't know what sort of people you might recommend the book to, but be sure they're the sort of people who don't mind spending a lot of time preparing their food.

                              All that being said, I personally follow a lot of the recipes. I make beet kvass, kombucha, sourkraut, yoghurt cheese, bone broths and drink and ferment raw milk.
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