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  • Looking to replace bread.

    Hello everyone. Basically what I'm looking for is a gluten-free bread for my sandwich that is store bought. Does such thing exist? Thanks in advanced.

  • #2
    There are tons of gluten-free breads. In my experience, even the smallest grocery stores will have a few of them these days.

    I've never seen any GRAIN-free breads even in my local health food store. I've seen a bread mix that's made from tapioca flour, but that's about the closest thing.
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    • #3
      1) gluten-free bread, I believe, is made with rice flour, and rice is still a grain
      2) Any reason you NEED to eat sandwiches?

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      • #4
        Sandwiches are delicious. Eat them, for sure.
        Ditch the bread though. You won't miss it. It's just a mode of transportation for all the yummy filling anyway. I use romaine leafs instead of bread. You can also roast some portabellos for buns.
        --Trish (Bork)
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        • #5
          Use Rivvin's angry bread. It is grain free. My GF, who would give up a kidney before bread, says it is really good and is happy to eat it. It takes about 3 minutes to make.

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          • #6
            Bork, aren't the cooked portobellas wet? This is something I've never understood about the concept of using portobellas as buns (and therefore never tried).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
              Sandwiches are delicious. Eat them, for sure.
              Ditch the bread though. You won't miss it. It's just a mode of transportation for all the yummy filling anyway. I use romaine leafs instead of bread. You can also roast some portabellos for buns.
              +1 to this...but if you're going to have GF bread - why not make your own... when I have a bread craving - I try to give it a week...if its still there, then I bake my own using the following recipe:
              Sun Valley Soul: Gluten Free High Fiber Bread
              I don't make it very often since I've been primal b/c I've found if/when I eat/drink things w/grains I tend to be quite bloated for 2-3days after consumption, and I feel like crap.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by ELDuran View Post
                Basically what I'm looking for is a gluten-free bread for my sandwich that is store bought. Does such thing exist?
                Oh, yeah. The "free from" sections of supermarkets are actually one of the fastest-growing sections. It's good business.

                You didn't ask, but FWIW I'd say either uses something like real wholegrain sourdough rye bread or leave it alone. All the types of store-bought GF-bread I've seen are highly industrialized food—like something out of a chemistry lab not a kitchen—and sell on the basis that the protein gluten found in wheat is the problem with coeliac disease (and other intestinal disorders). But is it?

                During the next few years, Dr. Haas treated over 600 cases of celiac disease with his Specific Carbohydrate Diet maintaining his patients on it for at least twelve months and found that prognosis of celiac disease was excellent: "There is complete recovery with no relapses, no deaths, no crisis, no pulmoary involvement, and no stunting of growth."
                But ...

                [In 1951 a] group of six faculty members of Departments of Pharmacology and of Paediatrics and child health of the University of Birmingham, after testing only ten children, decided that it was not the starch (carbohydrate) in the grains that so many had been reported as being deleterious, but it was the protein, gluten, in wheat and rye flour that was causing celiac symptoms.
                This is now the accepted answer. But should it be?

                Perhaps this theory is as broken as the notion, also widespread, that fat makes you fat. there's certainly reason to think so:

                Some patients showed remarkable clinical improvement in their general well-being after following a "gluten-free" diet. However, biopsy samples ... showed intestinal cells that were still markedly abnormal.
                Remember Dr. Hass's patients were cured by abstaining from difficult-to-digest starches for a year. After that they could eat what had previously been problematic foods.

                I think this is an area that should be re-opened and looked at again.

                Gluten-free products are now big business. But is the gluten the sole problem in some of these intestinal conditions? It appears it might not be. Quite probably those who have problems should avoid all hard-to-diest starches (which would include all of those gluten-free products) for at least a year. As for those who haven't got intestinal conditions ... what are they worried about?

                Either way, who needs gluten-free bread? It's a frankenfood, and addressing what might well not be problem anyway. If you feel the need for more carbohydrate in your diet, hasn't the store got bananas? Bananas, when properly ripe, are highly digestible.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by me jane View Post
                  Bork, aren't the cooked portobellas wet? This is something I've never understood about the concept of using portobellas as buns (and therefore never tried).
                  You've probably seen them *wet* because they are typically cooked with olive oil (or, by those truly wise in the ways of deliciousness, coconut oil), but they can be cooked without oil (or just a bare brushing of it) and they turn out pretty dry - particularly on the grill.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ELDuran View Post
                    Hello everyone. Basically what I'm looking for is a gluten-free bread for my sandwich that is store bought. Does such thing exist? Thanks in advanced.
                    If you must have something on the outside of your sandwich (and most applications of physics agree you must) replace your bread with meat. It's just better.

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                    • #11
                      This is made from raw sprouted sunflower seeds. It's more like a thick hearty cracker. I found them at Whole Foods

                      Lydia's Organics: Organic, Vegan, Raw

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lewis View Post
                        Remember Dr. Hass's patients were cured by abstaining from difficult-to-digest starches for a year. After that they could eat what had previously been problematic foods.

                        I think this is an area that should be re-opened and looked at again.

                        Gluten-free products are now big business. But is the gluten the sole problem in some of these intestinal conditions? It appears it might not be. Quite probably those who have problems should avoid all hard-to-diest starches (which would include all of those gluten-free products) for at least a year. As for those who haven't got intestinal conditions ... what are they worried about?

                        Either way, who needs gluten-free bread? It's a frankenfood, and addressing what might well not be problem anyway. If you feel the need for more carbohydrate in your diet, hasn't the store got bananas? Bananas, when properly ripe, are highly digestible.
                        I know this is totally anecdotal, but I embarked on a gluten-free trial a couple years ago hoping it would help with my Hashimoto's. It had no effect. My labs were actually slightly worse at the end and I didn't feel any better. However, going totally grain-free has helped in the lab and in palpable ways in my life. My results so far have been so positive, I don't want to mess with it. I watched my mother die young after successive autoimmune conditions so maybe I'm a bit intense about this.

                        As for the gluten-free bread, maybe it would be ok as an occasional treat if the OP is not trying to heal up one of these diseases of civilization, but I think getting away from processed foods is a better strategy for health. Rivvin's angry bread is a good compromise but also may not be something to eat daily depending on one's goals. I know it can be hard when someone's used to their food routine. Just dropping something that was a big part of your diet can be a bit shocking. It's been my experience that, once you do it, you realize it's just not that big of a deal. People ask me all the time how I can possibly live without bread or pasta, etc. Yet I get up every morning feeling great. I know that I likely would not live as long or as well with it.

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                        • #13
                          Try eating a cobra
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                          • #14
                            Yes, you can buy gluten-free bread, along with gluten free pastas and gluten free treats. However, it's very easy to overeat those products. Use them with caution. Udi's is one popular brand.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by brahnamin View Post
                              If you must have something on the outside of your sandwich (and most applications of physics agree you must) replace your bread with meat. It's just better.
                              Some early settlers in America did just that. They replaced bread with slices of turkey breast meat. This would have been people on the frontier, however—which, contrary to all the romanticism, wasn't the typical American experience.

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