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Just had fish and chips (from the fish and chip shop)

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  • Just had fish and chips (from the fish and chip shop)

    Can someone give me the reasons why I shouldn't do this again.

    I mean, I know full well it's not primal, but I want the specific - why isn't it primal? My first thoughts are lots of omega-6, and an insulin spike from all the chips. Correct? How does this food conflict with the PB exactly?

    Thanks

  • #2
    You shouldn't do it again because I hate you. ( ) ... we have no fish and chip shops here. (well, not traditional ones, anyway)

    On a more serious note, if you have flour-battered fish, then you're eating grains. Plus, if the fish & chips are cooked in vegetable oils, you're not doing yourself any favours.
    Newcomers: If you haven't read the book, at least read this thread ... and all the links!
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread17722.html

    F/49/5'4"
    Jan. 1, 2011: 186.6 lbs PBSW Mar. 1, 2011: 175.8 lbs
    CW: 146.8 lbs
    GW 140 lbs
    A proud member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals

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    • #3
      What belinda said. I'm going to Iceland next month and I am definitely going to have fish and chips, primal or not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by randallfloyd View Post
        Can someone give me the reasons why I shouldn't do this again.

        I mean, I know full well it's not primal, but I want the specific - why isn't it primal? My first thoughts are lots of omega-6, and an insulin spike from all the chips. Correct? How does this food conflict with the PB exactly?

        Thanks
        Just don't do it in the South of England. In the North Country the frying medium is usually still beef dripping. Across the South of the country they switched years ago to vegetable oil, then solid vegetable fats (I've seen blocks of it dissolving in the fryers), then—when the health problems associated with artificially cross-linked fats began to be known—back to vegetable oil again. It's a cheaper option, but, apparently, Northerners won't put up with it on taste grounds.

        Fish? batter? potatoes? There's no real problem there, except for some people whose guts aren't healthy and who should avoid too much carbohydrate. But industrial seed oils and vegetables fats—specially ones that possibly reused too many times—that's definitely an issue.

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        • #5
          HI. Have you asked at your Buxton chippy if they use beef fat for frying? If so, I reckon the fish is great and the chips will be fine. The very small amount of flour in the batter won't do too much harm, surely - as long as it isn't every day.

          I am so envious - which chippy did you go to??

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          • #6
            Originally posted by secretlobster View Post
            What belinda said. I'm going to Iceland next month and I am definitely going to have fish and chips, primal or not.
            I'd break my Primal WOE in a heartbeat for a good fish & chips!
            Newcomers: If you haven't read the book, at least read this thread ... and all the links!
            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread17722.html

            F/49/5'4"
            Jan. 1, 2011: 186.6 lbs PBSW Mar. 1, 2011: 175.8 lbs
            CW: 146.8 lbs
            GW 140 lbs
            A proud member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by belinda View Post
              I'd break my Primal WOE in a heartbeat for a good fish & chips!
              +1

              Although, belinda, you're just a few hours from the best fish & chips I've ever had at Westside Fish & Chips in Huntsville... if you are ever up near Algonquin Provincial Park, stop for your 20% there. YUM.
              Jen, former Midwesterner, living in the middle of nowhere.

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              • #8
                Pfft, you guys are useless.. you haven't put me off at all Infact I'll probably make it a once a month indulgence, because I do love good fish and chips (they're from Thompson's, breadsauce). And I'll ask about the frying oil.

                Is there anything we can do to reduce the bad effects of seed oils, or is it more a case of cutting consumption as much as possible? Cheers.

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                • #9
                  You could supplement with fish oil and try to eat less inflammatory foods in the surrounding days I suppose.

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                  • #10
                    Bigger problem with the veg oil than omega 6:3 ratio is the oxidation of the oil from the high temperature of the fryer, unless they're using fresh oil for each batch.

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                    • #11
                      I'm glad you brought this up because I indulge in fish n chips from whole foods twice a month. But since they changed their recipe, i don't think I'll indulge in it anymore. They use to make them with these huge fat pieces of cod and hardly any batter. But now the fish is skinny and the breading thicker.
                      But if I can find really good fish n chips with big fat fish, I think I would still indulge again.

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                      • #12
                        I would really, really try to find a chip shop that uses animal fat. The chips absorb too much of the oil to risk rancid omega 6's in such quantity - it is the sole reason I've utterly stopped eating fish and chips or it would be a monthly indulgence. If I still lived in the North, where enlightened chip shop proprietors can still be found, I'd be queuing there 1st Monday of each month....

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                        • #13
                          There are so many delicious and primal ways to prepare fish that this self-indulgence is inexcusable. Those of us suffering the ravages of inflammation can only look on in despair when those that haven't but do have the knowledge show so little fortitude
                          Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                          Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by peril View Post
                            There are so many delicious and primal ways to prepare fish that this self-indulgence is inexcusable. Those of us suffering the ravages of inflammation can only look on in despair when those that haven't but do have the knowledge show so little fortitude
                            Oh brother... Keep sipping that Kool-aid.

                            Obviously, it's up to you whether or not you consume fish and chips. It should be based on how your body reacts to it not what other folks think of it. Fish, paleo. Potatoes, paleo. Breading, not paleo, but a minor component. Oil, may or may not be paleo, question is whether those few grams of possible non-paleo oil is going to have a drastic negative effect on your health. I'd wager it won't. Heck, and even a minor negative effect on your health might be worth the pleasure of a plate of fish and chips now and then.

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                            • #15
                              We know that one fish and chips meal is not toxic. But do you know how many such meals it takes to cause damage? And will you be counting and be sure to limit the damage. We should be celebrating the goodness and deliciousness of good food, not convincing each other and ourselves that its OK to consume wheat and toxic oils. You might as well finish it off with a kool-aid. I'll stay the course thanks
                              Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                              Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

                              Comment

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