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  • if you're not losing weight

    i just wanted to take a minute to start a weight loss advice consolidation thread. i've noticed a lot of threads with people asking for help. i'm new here so you don't know much about me. i have many health issues that interfere with weight loss and have been struggling with my weight for most of my life. i also have celiac disease and went 100% gluten free 8-9 years ago.

    i've only lost a pound or two in the last 2.5 months. if i were focused on the scale, as i see some people focusing on, i would be really discouraged (i'm a little disappointed, but it's not unexpected). but, i am looking for progress, not poundage. i feel a bit better, it's a lot easier to control my cravings, i've been able to give up grains and sugar and am okay with that, the visits from my aunt flo have gotten more regular...etc...

    the most interesting changes for me were just noticed the day before yesterday. my belly has gotten smaller, my legs have gotten more muscular, and i actually have the beginnings of bicep muscles. now, let me be clear, i'm not weight training and my ability to exercise is limited. i believe this is entirely due to diet.

    the point i'm making is that if you look at this as a crash diet, you will probably be disappointed with your results. if you look at it as either a permanent or a long term change to your eating habits, you have a lot more emotional flexibility and can pay closer attention to the positive changes in your life and body.

    if you're really having trouble, take some time to find a good doctor to run some basic metabolic tests: thyroid, adrenals, reproductive...etc... you might have a problem that needs addressing. also make sure you're not deficient in any vitamins. cravings can result from deficiencies.

    cinnamon and apple cider vinegar can be helpful in the weight loss battle, too.

    there's my weight loss on primal advice, what's yours?
    my health blog

  • #2
    another thread made me think of this...

    you can also take your basal body temp every morning. for women, this will show you how well you're ovulating and might give you a better picture of your hormonal health.

    for both, a low basal body temp might indicate thyroid issues. not all docs believe in this, but some forward thinking docs do.

    if you find abnormalities, possible underlying problems might be interfering with your weight loss.
    my health blog

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    • #3
      I like this, patchooli. Weight loss/weight control is so individualized and can be such a long road. I've dropped 12 of the 25lbs I need to lose, but what I've noticed more is that I can see my muscles. I work out 3x a week, but had for 14 mos before I started Primal, and saw minimal improvement. It was like "oh, look at that, with the proper lighting and shadows, I have a small cut in my arm!". Now, I see it without flexing, in every day lighting The other wonderful benefit is that with 12 smalllllllll pounds, I have pants that I pull off without unbuttoning! I'm paying more attention to inches rather than weight, and it is so freeing. I still weigh, but the tape measure is my ultimate gauge as to how I'm doing.

      I'm 40 and have some hormonal shiz going on, but it appears that this way of life has fixed it. Like you, I can get past the cravings and it doesn't even bother me anymore. I haven't had wheat in months, and last weekend I tried some fried calamari while out with friends because I thought I could handle it. I was awake all night because my stomach felt like I had 20 knives in it. Fun! Learned my lesson there.

      Anyway, I am looking forward to many more positive changes in myself.... and wanting to see other people post their awesome changes from Primal living.

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      • #4
        love this thread!
        I'm too stubborn to give up so I keep on trying.

        You're never going to get to the top of the stairs if you don't walk up them.

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        • #5
          Great idea
          I'm stuck at my starting weight but I only started 1 month ago, have had lots of exam-anxiety induced carb fests and derailments.
          I do feel better and stronger and when I did stick to Primal I lost 2 lbs in one week and I could see the difference so this is a long-term commitment for me. I'm throwin out my scale, using tape + clothes to measure.

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          • #6
            Good thread. I started 8 weeks ago. Lost 7 lbs in the first two weeks, 1 lb in the next two weeks, and nothing since then. I dug up Mark's article on 17 reasons why you're not losing weight and incorporated 16/8 IF, sleeping 8 hours a day and started doing Tabata sprints on a stationary bike. Still nothing, although I've only been doing the sprints for a week so might be too early.

            I'm not too frustrated though. I am definitely thinner. I can see it in the mirror, everybody is commenting on it and last week I had to go shopping because pretty much every single pair of pants and shorts I owned was falling off my ass. I just don't understand HOW I'm getting thinner If I'm not losing weight but I am getting thinner that must mean I am building muscle, right? I'm only doing the PBF LHT workout twice a week though - knee pushups, elevated jack knife presses, air squats. And I walk 30 min most days. Can that much exercise really be building pounds and pounds of muscle?

            I think the best primal weight loss advice is to go shopping When you fit into lower-sized pants, it's a huge motivation. Although I must say the lack of weight loss doesn't discourage me. I love this way of eating and exercising and will continue doing it cos it makes me feel good and I get to eat delicious foods. Might have to tinker with things to kick start some more weight loss though. I still have fat to lose - my goal weight (although maybe it's not really a good idea to set a goal weight since that doesn't take into account muscle development) is 115 lb and I am at 125 lb right now (I'm 5'1). My next round of tinkering is going to be carb refeeds. I'll experiment with that for a month and if that doesn't work, I'll stop that and drop dairy. I only eat 1-2 oz of cheese on most days and some Greek yogurt 3-4 days a week so I really don't think dairy is the key but we'll see.
            My food blog, with many PB-friendly recipes

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            • #7
              Great motivation thread!

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              • #8
                good Thread. I had lost 20 lbs in 2 1/2 months. Then the past 6 weeks I have lost 1 lb. I was getting pretty ticked off until I looked at my spreadsheet. I have kept a spreadsheet journal of workouts, eatings, fasts, weight, and waist measurements. Also notes on any nagging injuries, vacations, etc. When I looked back on the last 6 weeks, I had gone from crossfit workouts to more of a starting strength type workouts. My weight may not have changed, but I am down 2 waist sizes in that time. Sometimes, it helps to look at other things and keep journals.
                RLTW

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ajax View Post
                  I'm only doing the PBF LHT workout twice a week though - knee pushups, elevated jack knife presses, air squats. And I walk 30 min most days. Can that much exercise really be building pounds and pounds of muscle?
                  Your body is actually partitioning the nutrients correctly. So, even though you are not going excessive on the LHT, your body is sending the nutrients to where you need them (muscle) as opposed to where you don't want it (fat).

                  I gained 8 lbs the first 4 months or so and have lost that in the last 2 months. So, via the scale, I am back where I started. However, I am now in size 32 waist pants (where I haven't been for about 12 years), I am getting much more vascular on my arms and legs and my abs are TRYING to get through. So, even though the number is the same (203lbs) I have seen dramatic results in the mirror.
                  People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

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                  • #10
                    One thing I have learned from various weight loss regimens over the years is to use a belt and count the notches instead of using a scale.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by IcarianVX View Post
                      Your body is actually partitioning the nutrients correctly. So, even though you are not going excessive on the LHT, your body is sending the nutrients to where you need them (muscle) as opposed to where you don't want it (fat).
                      Oh, that's interesting! Can you elaborate on that? Is that a result of cutting grains/sugar (something insulin-related?)
                      My food blog, with many PB-friendly recipes

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                      • #12
                        Huge results for me: I did the Whole 30 plan for almost a month and then added back a few things like occasional dairy (so it's now meat/fish, veggies, fruit, nuts and some dairy-mainly cheese). I also stopped drinking wine. From this I dropped slightly more than a pants size and got into the jeans I've been wanting to get into for five years! I didn't weigh myself or anything. I feel better about myself than I have in years and this happened really rapidly and has stuck since the beginning of February.

                        I figured I had lost close to 30 pounds from what I saw in the mirror and then made the mistake of stepping on a scale yesterday. Only about 15 pounds! At first I was really disappointed but I see myself and love what I see. I'm throwing the scale away! It's easy to see how controlling those things are to so many people.

                        The interesting thing is that, after about a month, I had a few slices of pizza and felt horrible (similar to the knives thing a previous poster mentioned). I've also had a slice of cake and felt the same uncomfortable feeling of pain and bloatedness. It's hard to believe how often I ate grains before. It took me so long to feel this good about myself. I'm never going back to conventional eating again. I'm much more satisfied eating primal.

                        I think that cutting down to real food for a good period of time is an excellent wake-up call. It gave me a chance to reevaluate what MY body prefers and doesn't. Trying different things and seeing the reaction was the best thing I ever did for myself.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by OneTallMamma View Post
                          The interesting thing is that, after about a month, I had a few slices of pizza and felt horrible (similar to the knives thing a previous poster mentioned). I've also had a slice of cake and felt the same uncomfortable feeling of pain and bloatedness. It's hard to believe how often I ate grains before.
                          i wonder how many of the people that gravitate toward paleo/primal are actually undiagnosed celiacs...
                          my health blog

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                          • #14
                            That would not surprise me. From Jules E. Dowler Shepard's book, The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free (DaCapo Press 2008):

                            "One in 133 Americans has Celiac disease (also known as celiac sprue, coeliac disease, non-tropical sprue or gluten sensitive enteropathy), a chronic and permanent sensitivity to the food protein gluten, found in the grains wheat, barley and rye. Developing the disease requires three things: a genetic predisposition; exposure to gluten through digestion; and a trigger to start this atypical immune system response. It can occur in people of all ages once exposed to gluten, and is the most common genetic disorder in North America and Europe, although it is found in populations all over the world.

                            ….[C]eliac disease (CD) is classified as an auto-immune disease, which simply means that the body attacks itself in an inappropriate immune system reaction. In CD, the reaction is caused specifically by exposure to gliadin, a protein of the food molecule gluten found in wheat, barley and rye …

                            Gluten intolerance is another condition that requires adherence to a gluten-free diet but does not rise to the level of an autoimmune disease. Food intolerances occur when the body is incapable of metabolizing certain foods, typically because it lacks certain enzymes necessary to break down particular food components. Those with gluten intolerance often have the same overt symptoms as those with CD, but they test negative for celiac disease by bloodwork and endoscopy. They learn through trial and error that gluten is the culprit for their uncomfortable symptoms, and once they adopt a gluten-free diet, live an otherwise normal healthy life.

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                            • #15
                              Walking is king. If you can get somewhere on foot in an hour or less, walk. The "move slowly, a lot" law has been understated in favor of "lift heavy things," I think.
                              You lousy kids! Get off my savannah!

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