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Bone broth love :)

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  • Bone broth love :)

    Buy spring lamb bones 99p. Put in slow cooker with apple cider vinegar, carrots, onion, garlic. Leave 24 hrs.

    Sieve. Retreive lamb (surprising amount!), realises bones super soft. Have a tentative nibble of bones, nice, have some more bones. Wonder how many calories in bones (lol). Eat lamb with sone spinach, save some for tomorrow. Leave sieved broth to cool and then skim fat off for further cooking at later date.

    So, bone broth is my new favourite thing, if I had super powers it would probably be an unbreakable skeleton!

    So can I save the soft bones to snack on them tomorrow? Would my work mates freak out if I chowed on them in the office?

    Bone broth

  • #2
    steakbones don't get soft. :-( my lamb bones didn't get soft either, but I didn't have them on for 24 hours.
    My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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    • #3
      ok, I am incapable of saying "bone broth love" without doing it in a barry white voice....


      Crap! I'm An Adult!

      My Primal Journal

      http://badquaker.com <--- podcast I'm a part of. Check it out if you like anarchy, geekiness and random ramblings.

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      • #4
        Nom nom nom nom!!
        I'm a paleo foodie, come check out my recipes: http://strangekitty.ca/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by irenesom View Post
          So can I save the soft bones to snack on them tomorrow? Would my work mates freak out if I chowed on them in the office?

          Bone broth
          Absolutely save them! Bones are full of calcium, very good for you!
          My food blog, with many PB-friendly recipes

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          • #6
            I make mine with American buffalo (bison) bones after I have eaten the marrow, plus a knuckle bone from the knee or foot, probably 5lbs total and 10 cups of water in my slow cooker which is at capacity. But I do it 48 hours and have never noticed the bones so soft that I could eat them. It must be that spring lamb is extra young and the bones get soft.

            Be careful about mixing different species to make broth, tried it once and it was awful, stick with one lamb, goat, chicken, beef etc. and stay with just that.

            Yes your work mates would think you are odd, I shudder to tell mine that I eat bison bone marrow and tongue for breakfast.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by irenesom View Post
              Buy spring lamb bones 99p. Put in slow cooker with apple cider vinegar, carrots, onion, garlic. Leave 24 hrs.

              Sieve. Retreive lamb (surprising amount!), realises bones super soft. Have a tentative nibble of bones, nice, have some more bones. Wonder how many calories in bones (lol). Eat lamb with sone spinach, save some for tomorrow. Leave sieved broth to cool and then skim fat off for further cooking at later date.

              So, bone broth is my new favourite thing, if I had super powers it would probably be an unbreakable skeleton!

              So can I save the soft bones to snack on them tomorrow? Would my work mates freak out if I chowed on them in the office?

              Bone broth
              +1 gotta love bone broth. You can even mix and match beef/pork/chicken and they all taste woderful. All that gelatinous broth is so good for ya and mineral rich.
              "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

              People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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              • #8
                Supposedly, if you add a shot of vinegar (apple cider) to the broth it helps to leach even more minerals out of the bones. I also add copious amounts of garlic and a chinese herb called astragalus, and a small handful of thyme and it becomes medicine as well. I love, love, love bone broth, the making of it and eating it!

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                • #9
                  How do you make the bones soft? Longer than 24 hours in a crockpot?
                  My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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                  • #10
                    I left mine (beef shank bones) for 72 hours and they were still rock hard (I know, I tried cracking them with a hammer at that point and just made tiny, little dents).

                    I do love it when I roast a chicken and the bones get nice and crunchy. NOM NOM NOM!
                    See what I'm up to: The Primal Gardener

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                    • #11
                      we love bone broth. they really require higher temp simmer for 5-6 hours for best broth. oxtail soup is one of our favorite.

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                      • #12
                        I posted a bone broth recipe recently for those interested, as well as many of the benefits of bone broth!

                        Easy Recipe: Mineral-Rich Bone Broth | Balanced Bites | Holistic & Paleo Nutrition in San Francisco, CA
                        Enjoy & be well!

                        Diane Sanfilippo, BS, NC, HLC
                        Certified Nutrition Consultant & Holistic Nutritionist specializing in Paleo nutrition
                        http://www.balancedbites.com

                        Author of the book "Practical Paleo: A Customized Approach to Health and a Whole-Foods Lifestyle" available on Amazon.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Balance View Post
                          +1 gotta love bone broth. You can even mix and match beef/pork/chicken and they all taste woderful. All that gelatinous broth is so good for ya and mineral rich.
                          I would seriously caution against this. I tried it once with bison, goat and lamb and the result was not palatable.

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                          • #14
                            I know bone broth is easy to make but I'm lazy....so are there any decent commercial broths or stock?

                            Thanks

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jenn View Post
                              I know bone broth is easy to make but I'm lazy....so are there any decent commercial broths or stock?

                              Thanks
                              Do you have a crockpot? Even for the laziest person, the link to the Balanced Bites recipe above couldn't be easier. I started a batch last night, just threw bones, water, vinegar and garlic in and turned the crockpot on. I'll probably turn it off tomorrow sometime, strain it and put it in jars.

                              Commercial broths will never have the mineral content of a homemade broth.
                              My Primal Journal with lots of food pr0n

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