Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vaccinations for travel

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vaccinations for travel

    At the end of the summer I'm going on a several-month trip to South America. I'll probably by in Colombia for the majority of the time, but may visit Argentina, Panama and Brazil (and possibly other surrounding countries).

    I was never vaccinated as a child and never had any issues with...well, anything. In general I'm not a big believer in vaccines, but at the same time I don't want to be stupid.

    So, for anyone who's knowledgable about vaccines - especially those who have traveled a bit - what's your take on this? What's important and what's unnecessary?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    At a minimum I'd want polio, MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), DPT (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus), hep A and B & perhaps meningitis. I would also be looking at anti-malarials.

    I would probably pack some probiotics as well for the aftermath of the inevitable travelers diarrhea. Not that I'm that paranoid but I have no problem w/ immunization and I like to travel without worry so that I will fully experience the place I'm in.
    Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

    Comment


    • #3
      You might start with the CDC site then discuss with your own doctor or someone who specializes in travel medicine.

      Travelers' Health - CDC
      "Sometimes, you need to make sure the angel on your shoulder has a wingman." -Me

      My primal log

      Comment


      • #4
        International Travel

        A lot of interesting information. The menu on the left under Tips for Traveling Abroad - sub menu Health Issues gives links for vaccination information.

        Our local major hospital has a Travel Medicine division - perhaps your local hospital has one.

        Here is their link http://www.christianacare.org/TravelMedicine which give links to other information.
        Last edited by Lynna; 05-12-2011, 11:13 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah I looked at what's required/recommended already. Seems like Yellow Fever is the big one and a few others are recommended. I'd rather just get it for things that are really going to be an issue. Maybe I'll get a few books so I have a better general understanding.

          Comment


          • #6
            PS: Your grok pumpkin is awesome!!
            My Before/After Pics
            Are you new here? Be sure to check these links FIRST, before reading anything on the forum! Succeed & PB 101

            "I am a work in progress." -Ani DiFranco

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Joshy View Post
              Yeah I looked at what's required/recommended already. Seems like Yellow Fever is the big one and a few others are recommended. I'd rather just get it for things that are really going to be an issue. Maybe I'll get a few books so I have a better general understanding.
              I'd look into what a travel health website says. Many of them assume you've already been vaccinated during childhood. If they areas where you'll be have a higher rate of mumps, measles, etc . . . you might very well want to get those. Contracting "childhood" diseases as an adult can be deadly and I absolutely would not want to be hospitalized in South America if at all avoidable.
              Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

              Comment


              • #8
                You can request to get your titers checked to see if you already have natural immunity to some of the illnesses you are considering vaccinating for.

                Comment


                • #9
                  It depends on what you are going to be doing. Missionary work where you will be in contact with a lot of people? Then you will want Hep, MMR, Polio vaccines. Are you going to be building? You'll want a tetanus shot. Hiking? Yellow fever, tetanus. As far as anti-malarials go- they can have some pretty nasty side effects (we had a guy on my trip to Africa who kept hallucinating he was seeing snakes while he was on anti malarials). Make sure to do your research!

                  I have traveled extensively around the world and ALWAYS make sure I have the recommended vaccines. I've seen people suffer with some really terrible stuff because they were not vaccinated.

                  Have a great trip- South America is beautiful- visit Ecuador if you can- especially Cuenca!
                  http://primalyak.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You definitely should consider the Hepatitis A vaccine - particularly since you can get it through food and water and the risk is high in South America and there is no specific treatment available to people who contract hep A; treatment is supportive only.

                    •Hepatitis A is one of the most common vaccine-preventable infections acquired during travel.
                    •In 2006 in the United States, among cases for which information regarding exposures during the incubation period was collected, the most frequently identified risk factor for hepatitis A was international travel (reported by 15% of case-patients overall).
                    •As in previous years, most travel-related cases (72%) were associated with travel to Mexico and Central/South America. As HAV transmission in the United States has decreased, cases among travelers to countries in which hepatitis is endemic have accounted for an increased proportion of all cases.
                    •The risk of acquiring HAV infection for U.S. residents traveling abroad varies with living conditions, length of stay, and the incidence of HAV infection in the area visited. For travelers to other countries, risk for infection increases with duration of travel and is highest for those who live in or visit rural areas, trek in back-country areas, or frequently eat or drink in settings of poor sanitation.
                    •Nevertheless, many cases of travel-related hepatitis A occur in travelers to developing countries with “standard” tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by soniayak View Post
                      Hiking? Yellow fever, tetanus. As far as anti-malarials go- they can have some pretty nasty side effects (we had a guy on my trip to Africa who kept hallucinating he was seeing snakes while he was on anti malarials). Make sure to do your research!
                      I have no experience with anti-malarials, but I second you on that, they're heavy drugs (they alter your blood composition for like a year and they're not always suitable for long term usage (more than 3 months in a row))and they don't protect you from every kind of malaria. So be sure to use repellents (applicable on clothes or on skin). Avoid the bites as best you can.
                      ======== ==== == =
                      Be hardcore, drink water

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks guys.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Lesse, measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine, poliovirus vaccine, etc just for the basics. Yellow fever vaccine is a must if you're going to Colombia. Hepatitis A vaccine goes without saying. Maybe look into getting the typhoid shot if you're going into tropical areas in South America or off the beaten path in general.

                          Yeah, it ain't Disneyworld out there that's for sure.

                          Find a travel medicine clinic and book an appointment, they'll set you up way better than me, a random dude on the internet.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            check also on some of the worms that can be there. i went to chile recently and got a tapeworm, it was pretty much the worst experience of my life... sanitation standards for foods are different in south america and if you are not prepared you could end up pretty ill.

                            i was not vacinated for the second 2/3 shots in the MMR set because i had a near-fatal reaction to the first (not sure which that wa, maybe the measles one?) and this wasn't a problem, technically or physiologically, while i was there. but the worm. man, that sucked.
                            Check out my new webpage: The Carnivore Runner
                            Friend me on "The Facebook"
                            Follow me on Twitter!

                            For customized training / nutritional plans for runners from a former athlete who has personal experience in dealing with severe food allergies, please email me at foxATtinybikeDOTnet. I am ISA certified as a personal trainer and have coached many runners at the recreational or young-competitor level to towards their goals! Most of all, I'd love to help you with yours.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Some countries require certain vaccinations before you can go there. Be sure to check that out with the individual countries you intend to visit.

                              My experience with the yellow fever shot is that it makes you feel miserable for a few days, so if you are going to get it, I would recommend that you get it well before you travel.
                              Live your life and love your life. It's the only one you get.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X