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Great article about B12 deficiency

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  • Great article about B12 deficiency

    From The Healthy Skeptic...

    http://thehealthyskeptic.org/b12-def...m_medium=email

  • #2
    No doubt. I think that modern humans are deficient in liver, shellfish and brains and don't get enough B12 - we need a lot more than the RDA due to generally poor absorption. Supplementation appears to be effective too; no shame in it if you don't like those foods or are a vegetarian. Better than dying.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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    • #3
      Great now I have to B12 injected!?! I hate injections.
      My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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      • #4
        The high dose sublingual vitamin B12 works. There are studies in Europe showing it can be just as effective and with better compliance than the injections.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Egoldstein View Post
          The high dose sublingual vitamin B12 works. There are studies in Europe showing it can be just as effective and with better compliance than the injections.
          +1

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          • #6
            I shoot up with B12 shots in the shoulders, 3 times per week. The 'regular ' Doctors, said my levels were fine....my naturopathic Doctor said, 'nope, want your levels doubled'...this was in regards to numb feet.....so with that first shot..the numbness almost disappeared completely and if I had NOT seeked the help of a naturopath, who is still an actual MD, I would still have had numb feet due to their 'tests'....and who knows what future damage not getting proper help could have led to. we need to be SO proactiv about our health..... regular medicine doesn't always cut it..... at least here in Canada......

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            • #7
              and P.S., i give myself shots...just order the stuff every 10 weeks....it's easy now...takes two seconds.... :-)

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              • #8
                Methyl B12 is more effective than the regular stuff. I take a sublingual tablet of it several times a week. It's very helpful.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by piano-doctor-lady View Post
                  Methyl B12 is more effective than the regular stuff. I take a sublingual tablet of it several times a week. It's very helpful.
                  Exactly... this is what the article discusses. I was taking 1,000mg every other day and now I will definitely take it everyday. I had a deficiency years ago and my doctor said to take 250mg/day. How come doctors are so conservative? Same with vitamin D. I don't understand it. Damn Western medicine!

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                  • #10
                    healthy people who are proactive about their health don't make the medical community alot of money....... they are not about prevention..just treating symptoms.... :-( ( not always, there are some amazing Doctors out there...just in general...)

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                    • #11
                      I just read the article, and it's good. However, I wonder about this paragraph:

                      <<If you suspect you have B12 deficiency, the first step is to get tested. You need an accurate baseline to work from. If you are B12 deficient, the next step is to identify the mechanism causing the deficiency. This is something you’ll probably need help with from a medical practitioner. Once the mechanism is identified, the appropriate form (injection, oral, sublingual or nasal) of supplementation, the dose and the length of treatment can be selected.>>

                      Given that B12 is not dangerous when taken in excess, and that methyl B12 is the best form, and that it's cheap, and the article even says that extra can give you methyl groups which are useful in other bodily reactions, why not just get some sublingual B12 (I like Jarrow, it worked very well to improve my sleep after the very first tablet) and try it? See how you feel.

                      WHY do you need a baseline level? WHY do you need to identify a mechanism for any shortage found? WHY get a medical practitioner for something this easy, inexpensive, and harmless? WHY would you want to pre-set the length of treatment? Why not just go on taking some, and if you think it might be too much eventually, cut back a little and see how you do?

                      Sometimes I think that we as a country overdo the lab test-practitioner-lab-retest business. It slows everything down and adds mightily to costs. And, like the conversion of cyanocobalamin to the active methyl form, it can sometimes put obstacles in our way.

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                      • #12
                        piano-doctor-lady...

                        I agree that you should just take it, but I think the reason for a baseline is that even though it's a water-soluble vitamin it is stored in the liver unlike the others that are excreted by the kidney.

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                        • #13
                          I try to take 1 or 2 1000 (some small measurement of grams) a day, vitamin shoppe brand. I assume they have to be from an animal source? Does it have to be in oil too?
                          My journal where I attempt to overcome Chrohns and make good food as well

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                          • #14
                            I get a really strong b-complex from my dr's office instead of injections. It works fine. If I get slack on taking it, I feel tired and get brain fog.

                            I think most people can substitute injections with the sublingual liquid if they take enough of it.

                            Years ago I used to get Twin Labs brewers yeast, the Ultra variety (something like that, I forget). That seemed to work good too.

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                            • #15
                              Well; I'm officially confused. The article clearly states that B12 can only come from animal sources; plant sources are labeled analogs and it's claimed they actually increase the need for B12.

                              Looking for a good source of sublingual methylcobalamin on iHerb, my search turned up a number of items that have it, but call themselves "vegetarian"—here's one which has a "co-enzyme" dibencozide. Ah! The current wiki page says this is an active form.

                              But it seems to me that something isn't right here: if the article is correct, this supplement cannot be vegetarian and contain what it says it does, right? Or does the label "vegetarian" mean something else in this context (e.g., the nonvitamin stuff is all from veg sources)?
                              “Whether you think you can, or think you can’t — you’re right.” ~ Henry Ford

                              My primal journal

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