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Eating low carb in pregnancy produces fatter kids....

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  • Eating low carb in pregnancy produces fatter kids....

    Wow...

    As ever, I do wonder about correlation vs causation here. Why were those women eating low carb? Could it be because they themselves have a history of fat accumulation, which they passed on to their kids?

    Do Low-Carb Diets During Pregnancy Lead to Fatter Kids? | 80beats | Discover Magazine
    Liz.

    Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
    Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

  • #2
    women are in a ketogenic state during pregnancy regardless arent they? i think babies should be big, not fat but chubby and as they grow they become normal. i think women prolly need more carbs during pregnancy

    but regardless, a primal diet during pregnancy causing fatkids, i call bullsh*t
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    • #3
      but regardless, a primal diet during pregnancy causing fatkids, i call bullsh*t
      +1 Doesn't make sense.
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      • #4
        Yes, chubby and then using that chubbiness to fuel upward growth and brain development seems optimal.

        Not sure about the theory being crap though...it does seem like a reasonable adaptive mechanism for humans...if there's a low carb environment, tinker with the genes so offspring can gain weight more easily?
        Liz.

        Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
        Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lizch View Post
          Yes, chubby and then using that chubbiness to fuel upward growth and brain development seems optimal.

          Not sure about the theory being crap though...it does seem like a reasonable adaptive mechanism for humans...if there's a low carb environment, tinker with the genes so offspring can gain weight more easily?
          +1

          Sally Fallon mentions this.
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          • #6
            ooohh i saw this on facebook the other day, and i called bullshit too! but i also stated that maybe the mothers in the study thought all carbs were bad...including the healthy ones (like veggies) because i know people who take on the low carb lifestyle a little too far...and they arent getting enough healthy fats or veggies! but i think this is another study to try and scare pregnant women out of a healthier lifestyle!
            I am very pregnant 34 weeks to be exact, and i plan on making the switch within the next 2 week s, once we move into our own place! im very very excited! my last pregnancy i made nothing but excuses (it really wasnt that long ago) and this time im just ready to enjoy the full benefits of health!
            I am the creator of my reality

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            • #7
              They don't define low-carb here. There are many ways to low-carb it, as I discovered accidentally while browsing the comments on a low-carb recipe. Wow. Fake maple syrup with no carbs? What the heckity heck is that?

              Also, small sample size. Also, weird sideways testing methods, like the methylation to determine epigenetic switch-ups? That's not very direct in my view. We don't know enough about this stuff to be making that sort of correlation into causation at this point.

              Anecdotally, I wasn't Primal during pregnancy, but my daughter is 20mo and in the 5%ile for weight and 75%ile for height. My doctor quizzed me about what we feed her and I'm not sure she believed me about all the bacon, eggs, full fat yogurt, cheese, meat, and nuts. I laughed inwardly about it because all those things should ostensibly cause her to be THIN. Which is obviously not my goal at this stage of her game, or ever for that matter. I don't worry about it because she is tracking my development almost exactly at this point. So definitely something genetic going on.
              The Paleo Periodical
              It's not a Diet. It's a lifestyle.

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              • #8
                I have a theory:
                I know that the diet of the mother during pregnancy can alter the child's metabolism, as it more or less lets them know what nutrition they can expect from the environment they'll be born into, and the metabolism adapts somewhat to increase chances of survival. (fact)

                therefore, my theory: the mothers' low-carb diet makes children more carb-sensitive, and as they are born into what is in fact a 'high carb environment,' if they are fed cheerios and fruit roll ups and healthy whole grains, they are more likely to be store that as fat, since the metabolism was created to face a carb-scarce environment. [though it would be interesting to see what the 'low-carb' mothers were eating--pepperoni sticks and peanuts, or leafy greens and meat]

                I don't think it's necessarily a reason for concern for Primal mothers, because 1) Primal/Paleo is 'carb agnostic,' not necessarily low carb, and 2) Primal momma presumably equals Primal kiddos, therefore even if kids were more likely to get fat on high-carb food, they wouldn't be eating that junk anyway, so it wouldn't matter.
                Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. (Thoreau)

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                • #9
                  we have 2 boys, 18 month apart. during first one, wife was almost vegetarian, while she was eating lot of meat on the second kid.(not primal either way or low carb) second kid was definitely chubby from get go. but now, they are both lean young boys. anything beyond that, it is upto genetics. older kid is tall, while younger kid is average.

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                  • #10
                    And there is more than one source right now suggesting that too many carbs and/or an overweight mom causes insulin resistance (and fat kids). Taubes mentions it but he didn't just make it up.

                    So which is it?

                    If the theory in the OP is correct, hunter gatherer societies that don't eat a lot of carbs would have fat kids. I don't think they do.

                    To test the opposite theory, I'll do a study at the Wal Mart of overweight families with small, overweight kids, and see if they have low-carb contents in the shopping cart. What do you think I'll find? Meat and veggies, or milk, bread, Milky Ways and Cap'N Crunch?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DFH View Post
                      If the theory in the OP is correct, hunter gatherer societies that don't eat a lot of carbs would have fat kids. I don't think they do.
                      I think this is because of what Sybil pointed out. Those hunter gatherer societies tend to maintain low carb from cradle to grave. In modern society, setting your kids up to expect low carb as a fetus and then dumping high carb on them as kids seems like a plausible recipe for disaster.
                      Liz.

                      Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
                      Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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                      • #12
                        I wanna be a scientist. I can get paid to produce really bad results and then publish papers that get talked about in the media as though they are earth shattering revelations.

                        So, without further ado, from the abstract to the paper: "Regression analyses including sex and neonatal epigenetic marks explained >25% of the variance in childhood adiposity."

                        Interpretation: we performed some really cool experiments with methylation of certain chromosomes so we could call ourselves epigeneticists, but when all was said and done we still couldn't explain 75% of the variance in childhood obesity. But as the mantra in academia is publish or perish, we had to write the paper, but make it hopefully dense enough for people to not fully understand what it was that we actually found.

                        If I performed 25% of my job, I would be fired in an instant.

                        -PK
                        My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pklopp View Post
                          I wanna be a scientist. I can get paid to produce really bad results and then publish papers that get talked about in the media as though they are earth shattering revelations.

                          So, without further ado, from the abstract to the paper: "Regression analyses including sex and neonatal epigenetic marks explained >25% of the variance in childhood adiposity."

                          Interpretation: we performed some really cool experiments with methylation of certain chromosomes so we could call ourselves epigeneticists, but when all was said and done we still couldn't explain 75% of the variance in childhood obesity. But as the mantra in academia is publish or perish, we had to write the paper, but make it hopefully dense enough for people to not fully understand what it was that we actually found.

                          If I performed 25% of my job, I would be fired in an instant.

                          -PK
                          C'mon - you're being a little harsh. They did not only perform 25% of their job - the identified gene regulation that impacted 25% of the variation in overweight kids. If someone found a mechanism that explained 25% of the cancers in the world, you'd think it was important.

                          Besides, the media interpretation of the paper often has nothing to do with the scientists or how they interpreted their work.

                          Oh yeah - and let's not forget, most scientists go to school for a very, very long time to make total crap money in the end. Believe me, I know.
                          Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                          http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                          • #14
                            Interesting study, but I found the description pretty vague. I'd be very interested in seeing the raw data...exactly what these women were eating. "Low carb" doesn't really tell us much. They also seem to think what matters is the diet in early pregnancy, but the first trimester is a time where a lot of women have trouble keeping any food down, and many have strong food cravings and/or aversions.

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                            • #15
                              My midwife told me the opposite - that too many carbs make fat babies. You better believe I did not want to be giving birth to a big baby, so I watched my carbs closely and had a sweet little 6.5 pound boy who is now two and very tall and skinny.

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