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How Do You Like Your Pork Cooked?

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  • How Do You Like Your Pork Cooked?

    Let's say a pork steak for easy comparison.

    I LOVE my beef steak cooked medium rare.

    I ask about pork because conventional wisdom says to cook chicken and pork at 160 degrees. I think beef is 145.

    So, do you cook your pork longer than beef? Or do you like it medium rare like beef?
    Find me at aToadontheRoad.com. Cheers!

  • #2
    Normally longer. Probably due to CW left-overs (and also because trichinella was quite common when I was a kid and I remember my parents always double checking the meat - normally they would buy a whole pig - for it in the labs).

    But beef should be rare, dripping blood

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    • #3
      I have no qualms about eating rare/raw beef, slight qualms with pork, and extreme qualms with chicken, lol. that's assuming they're all high quality, happy animals and I know the processor, etc. Ham steak is delicious med or med rare and pork is just as bad overcooked as beef and poultry are.
      5'4" 39yo mother to five sweeties & married to their AMAZING DaddyGrok
      Current Weight: 175lb__________________________________Goal: 135lb
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      ***Winning a 20-year war against binge eating disorder***

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      • #4
        My mom used to cook pork to the point of dried out. It was awful. I don't eat it much these days-no reason, just overlooked, but I definitely want it juicy when I do eat pork. CW for pork is based on the trichinella problems of the past, which are now not a problem at least for most pork. In the US you should be able to eat commercially available pork just as rare as a steak. Doing so with a free range pig would make me nervous, though, and I'd definitely cook wild game pork to an internal temperature of 160.
        Peace. Love. Steak.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by AmyKickass View Post
          My mom used to cook pork to the point of dried out. It was awful. I don't eat it much these days-no reason, just overlooked, but I definitely want it juicy when I do eat pork. CW for pork is based on the trichinella problems of the past, which are now not a problem at least for most pork. In the US you should be able to eat commercially available pork just as rare as a steak. Doing so with a free range pig would make me nervous, though, and I'd definitely cook wild game pork to an internal temperature of 160.
          This...
          I never cook my pork to welldone, unless by accident....

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          • #6
            Medium-rare to medium, depending on the cut. But I like my bacon really crispy.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by AmyKickass View Post
              In the US you should be able to eat commercially available pork just as rare as a steak. Doing so with a free range pig would make me nervous, though, and I'd definitely cook wild game pork to an internal temperature of 160.
              I don't get this. Did I miss something? You are saying you should be able to eat commercially raised pork as rare as a steak but if its pastured from a local farm it would make you nervous? Isn't that backwards?
              Find me at aToadontheRoad.com. Cheers!

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              • #8
                2nd the crispy bacon. I generally cook pork past pink. I don't think it would be healthy to cook it like my beef steaks because I hardly cook my beef steaks. I'm particular about cuts because many get dry. We sometimes do tenderloin but we make it in a roulade with lots of cheese and sour cream which helps keep it moist. If I do chops, I get extra thin so they cook super fast. The most common cut I get is a pork shoulder which gets a longer cook and is turned into pulled pork.

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                • #9
                  What? Cook pork? Ferment it!

                  Nem Chua Recipe Vietnamese Fermented/Cured Pork | Ravenous Couple: Cooking up Life

                  You can omit the sugar - just makes it more sour

                  Good stuff - super primal!

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                  • #10
                    I eat my pork medium, usually. There are occasions I have stuffed a slice or two of raw bacon in my mouth. However that's only because my pork is pastured (wild) boar, and I have a local butcher who handles all of my meat purchases. There is NO WAY I'd do that with conventional pork from the grocery store.

                    My mother used to cook pork to death too, and I never liked it. It was only when I started cooking for myself that I began to love pork.

                    Pork FAT, however, must be cooked really well. It just tastes better that way.

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                    • #11
                      I eat my beef rare. Pork does not matter unless there are Mcintosh apples on hand for sauce.
                      In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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                      • #12
                        I'll admit: I thought of something very different from cooked pig flesh when reading the title of this thread.

                        On subject: Isn't Trichinosis an issue with under-cooked pork? I mean, I don't want leathery pork, but I don't want parasite eggs in my muscles, either...
                        Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. (Thoreau)

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sibylsybil View Post
                          I'll admit: I thought of something very different from cooked pig flesh when reading the title of this thread.

                          On subject: Isn't Trichinosis an issue with under-cooked pork? I mean, I don't want leathery pork, but I don't want parasite eggs in my muscles, either...
                          I asked my butcher one time and he informed that it used to be a issue but current commercially raised hogs are not fed slops or raised in mud (as oppose to 50 years ago). The cases of Trichinosis is very rare now, so cooking pork when some pink in the inside is fine. In any case, the parasites are destroyed at a temperature of 137 F.

                          I eat my pork chops/steaks with a little pink in the inside. No problems here.
                          Last edited by Zed; 04-22-2011, 04:49 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I used to love pork. When we have a celebration it's usually with a pig on the spit and sometimes lamb. I always hoped it would be pig. But a few years back when I ate some the meat really stunk to me so I stopped eating it. Then just recently thought I would buy some pork steaks. Cooked them with lots of spices but still it stunk. The smell turns me off eating it. I am fine with bacon and ham.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Primal Toad View Post
                              I don't get this. Did I miss something? You are saying you should be able to eat commercially raised pork as rare as a steak but if its pastured from a local farm it would make you nervous? Isn't that backwards?
                              As strange as it sounds commercially raised pork is less likely to be carrying Trichinella, because of all the new stringent controls in place. Pasture raised and you're taking a slight risk because you can't be certain what the animal was eating. Still a low chance of Trichinella, but if the pig ate an infected rodent for example, that's how it could be carrying the worm.

                              I do all my pork well done because it's not worth the risk. Marinading tenderizes it anyway.

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