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  • Arrowroot powder/flour

    What's the general consensus? Good? Or bad?

    On one hand, it's whole food, just ground tuber.

    Is there an 'on the other hand'?
    Chief cook & bottle washer for one kid, a dog, 6 hens, 2 surprise! roosters, two horses, and a random 'herd' of quail.

    ~The ultimate ignorance is the rejection of something one knows nothing about and refuses to investigate~

  • #2
    I use it as a thickener/starch. I can't use cornstarch so this is a good sub.
    The more I see the less I know for sure.
    -John Lennon

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    • #3
      Don't know of any other hand. Just don't forget that its a source of calories
      Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

      Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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      • #4
        It's just a starch. Like potato starch (just with shorter amylose chains than potato, if I recall, so it's not as strong of a thickener initially, but is more heat stable).
        "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Doddibot View Post
          It's just a starch. Like potato starch (just with shorter amylose chains than potato, if I recall, so it's not as strong of a thickener initially, but is more heat stable).
          And doesn't taste potato-y or have a weird texture when you use it to thicken gravy! lol
          The more I see the less I know for sure.
          -John Lennon

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          • #6
            Though one of the things with arrowroot is, while it thickens very quickly, it breaks down again if you keep heating it. So you need to add it right at the end of your cooking. If you're making something ahead and want to reheat it later, it likely will be unthickened.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lil_earthmomma View Post
              And doesn't taste potato-y or have a weird texture when you use it to thicken gravy! lol
              Yes, the texture is due to the chain length. Potato starch has very long chains, so needs a bit more heat to break it down so it doesn't seem stringy. Arrowroot, on the other hand, already has short amylose chains, so can be used for thickening just before serving.

              Arrowroot does have a taste, but it's very subtle compared to some potato starches (which are commonly extracted from potato skins, which also have most of the potato flavour)
              "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Doddibot View Post
                Yes, the texture is due to the chain length. Potato starch has very long chains, so needs a bit more heat to break it down so it doesn't seem stringy. Arrowroot, on the other hand, already has short amylose chains, so can be used for thickening just before serving.

                Arrowroot does have a taste, but it's very subtle compared to some potato starches (which are commonly extracted from potato skins, which also have most of the potato flavour)
                Cool, that is so interesting! Thanks!
                The more I see the less I know for sure.
                -John Lennon

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                • #9
                  Speaking of ground tubers, has anyone found sweet potato starch in their local Asian supermarket? There seems to be a general feeling in the primal community that sweet potato is better than potato, so I'd be interested to know if anyone has used sweet potato starch.
                  "Thanks to the combination of meat, calcium-rich leaf foods, and a vigorous life, the early hunter-gatherers were robust, with strong skeletons, jaws, and teeth." - Harold McGee, On Food And Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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                  • #10
                    Sweet potato is not better than potato, despite the common beliefs. Sweet potato is a new world food too. Peel your potatoes and enjoy them, they have more vitamin c and potassium too.

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                    • #11
                      Potatoes, baked, flesh, without salt

                      Nutrient Units Value per 100 grams

                      Water g 75.42 6 1.207
                      Energy kcal 93 0 0.000
                      Energy kJ 390 0 0.000
                      Protein g 1.96 6 0.018
                      Total lipid (fat) g 0.10 0 0.000
                      Ash g 0.97 6 0.061
                      Carbohydrate, by difference g 21.55 0 0.000
                      Fiber, total dietary g 1.5 0 0.000
                      Sugars, total g 1.70 0 0.000

                      Minerals

                      Calcium, Ca mg 5 6 1.393
                      Iron, Fe mg 0.35 6 0.080
                      Magnesium, Mg mg 25 6 1.838
                      Phosphorus, P mg 50 6 3.593
                      Potassium, K mg 391 6 18.745
                      Sodium, Na mg 5 6 0.440
                      Zinc, Zn mg 0.29 6 0.031
                      Copper, Cu mg 0.215 6 0.043
                      Manganese, Mn mg 0.161 6 0.014
                      Selenium, Se mcg 0.3 0 0.000

                      Vitamins

                      Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid mg 12.8 3 0.617
                      Thiamin mg 0.105 6 0.006
                      Riboflavin mg 0.021 6 0.001
                      Niacin mg 1.395 6 0.102
                      Pantothenic acid mg 0.555 1 0.000
                      Vitamin B-6 mg 0.301 6 0.012
                      Folate, total mcg 9 6 0.557
                      Folic acid mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Folate, food mcg 9 6 0.557
                      Folate, DFE mcg_DFE 9 0 0.000
                      Choline, total mg 14.5 0 0.000
                      Betaine mg 0.2 0 0.000
                      Vitamin B-12 mcg 0.00 0 0.000
                      Vitamin B-12, added mcg 0.00 0 0.000
                      Vitamin A, RAE mcg_RAE 0 0 0.000
                      Retinol mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Carotene, beta mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Carotene, alpha mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Cryptoxanthin, beta mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin A, IU IU 0 0 0.000
                      Lycopene mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Lutein + zeaxanthin mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) mg 0.04 0 0.000
                      Vitamin E, added mg 0.00 0 0.000
                      Vitamin D (D2 + D3) mcg 0.0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin D IU 0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin K (phylloquinone) mcg 0.3 0 0.000

                      Sweet potato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt

                      Nutrient Units Value per 100 grams

                      Water g 75.78 8 2.487
                      Energy kcal 90 0 0.000
                      Energy kJ 378 0 0.000
                      Protein g 2.01 4 0.169
                      Total lipid (fat) g 0.15 5 0.009
                      Ash g 1.35 4 0.093
                      Carbohydrate, by difference g 20.71 0 0.000
                      Fiber, total dietary g 3.3 4 0.160
                      Sugars, total g 6.48 0 0.000
                      Sucrose g 2.28 12 0.352
                      Glucose (dextrose) g 0.57 12 0.126
                      Fructose g 0.50 12 0.107
                      Lactose g 0.00 4 0.000
                      Maltose g 3.12 0 0.000
                      Galactose g 0.00 0 0.000
                      Starch g 7.05 4 2.607

                      Minerals

                      Calcium, Ca mg 38 67 2.126
                      Iron, Fe mg 0.69 68 0.031
                      Magnesium, Mg mg 27 68 0.775
                      Phosphorus, P mg 54 67 1.517
                      Potassium, K mg 475 68 9.306
                      Sodium, Na mg 36 68 3.770
                      Zinc, Zn mg 0.32 68 0.013
                      Copper, Cu mg 0.161 68 0.007
                      Manganese, Mn mg 0.497 68 0.038
                      Selenium, Se mcg 0.2 58 0.114

                      Vitamins

                      Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid mg 19.6 4 8.543
                      Thiamin mg 0.107 3 0.018
                      Riboflavin mg 0.106 4 0.005
                      Niacin mg 1.487 4 0.284
                      Pantothenic acid mg 0.884 4 0.130
                      Vitamin B-6 mg 0.286 4 0.056
                      Folate, total mcg 6 4 2.319
                      Folic acid mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Folate, food mcg 6 4 2.319
                      Folate, DFE mcg_DFE 6 0 0.000
                      Choline, total mg 13.1 0 0.000
                      Betaine mg 34.6 2 0.000
                      Vitamin B-12 mcg 0.00 0 0.000
                      Vitamin B-12, added mcg 0.00 0 0.000
                      Vitamin A, RAE mcg_RAE 961 0 0.000
                      Retinol mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Carotene, beta mcg 11509 0 0.000
                      Carotene, alpha mcg 43 0 0.000
                      Cryptoxanthin, beta mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin A, IU IU 19218 0 0.000
                      Lycopene mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Lutein + zeaxanthin mcg 0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) mg 0.71 3 0.453
                      Vitamin E, added mg 0.00 0 0.000
                      Tocopherol, beta mg 0.00 3 0.005
                      Tocopherol, gamma mg 0.01 3 0.000
                      Tocopherol, delta mg 0.00 3 0.000
                      Vitamin D (D2 + D3) mcg 0.0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin D IU 0 0 0.000
                      Vitamin K (phylloquinone) mcg 2.3 3 0.467

                      http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by grokka View Post
                        Sweet potato is not better than potato, despite the common beliefs. Sweet potato is a new world food too. Peel your potatoes and enjoy them, they have more vitamin c and potassium too.
                        I thought the problem with potatoes isn't that they're a new world food, but that they're part of the nightshade family, which sweet potatoes are not. (Citation needed... anyone? Bueller?)

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                        • #13
                          Sweet potatoes do offer more nutrients and fibre but there isn't anything wrong with eating white potatoes.

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                          • #14
                            WHFoods: What are nightshades and in which foods are they found?

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                            • #15
                              People don't bat an eye at peppers and eggplants here. Without an autoimmune condition or personal sensitivity, nightshades should be fine. Melissa at hunt gather love has an interesting post on yam toxins.

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