Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Green good supplement opinions

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Green good supplement opinions

    So I have decided I want to take a green food supplement. I eat alot of salad but the supplments have alot of veggies and things that I do not eat regularly that I feel would be benefitial. I have found three supplements that have got great reviews. One of them has barley grass and the other two have barley, oat and wheat grass. I'm not sure if these grasses are primal or not. They aren't the actual plant so i assume it is a gray area. These are the three supplements what do you think?

    BOKU International, The Elixir of Life - Organic Boku Superfood 10oz

    Pure Synergy Ingredients, The Synergy Company

    http://www.healthforce.com/shop?page...&category_id=1
    "Live Free or Die"

  • #2
    Why would you think that barley/oat/wheat grass are "not the actual plant"? They are made from the plants, aren't they?

    I must admit I find the idea of eating blenderized grass to be a little off-putting, despite the extremely hyperbolized health claims I've read some people make. For example, from one of those pages: "blood sugar, detoxification, the immune system, liver, kidneys, blood, bones, colon, regularity, circulation, and longevity*"
    * These statements have not been evaluated by the F.D.A. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any disease.

    Whatever that means.

    If the seeds are so well-defended, why wouldn't the grass be too? I mean there's presumably a reason we and other primates didn't evolve as grass-eaters... despite spending a good amount of time evolving on a savannah covered in grass...

    If I felt a strong need to get more chlorophyll in my diet, I'd do it by eating a more typical soft-leafed vegetable like say, spinach.
    Last edited by Jenny; 04-04-2011, 04:24 PM. Reason: savannah comment
    "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

    Comment


    • #3
      Well I don't really care about the detox and colon cleanse stuff. I do think that these supplements have alot of things in them I do not eat but would benefit from. I eat pounds of spinach daily. Brocolli, brussel sprouts, and asparagus are also regulars. I do not eat blue green algae, Spirulina, Chlorella, or seaweed to name a few. I think that these things are healthy and the most convenient, and economical way to get them would be in a supplement.

      As far as the grass vs grains thing. Grains are hard and have the protected coating. Grasses on the other hand don't have them. I don't have any proof of any of this but that is why I posted up the thread. To get other people who are hopefully more knowledgeable about it then I am to fill in the gaps.
      "Live Free or Die"

      Comment


      • #4
        Most of those things you list are foods humans have a history of eating. It's basically just the grass part that causes me to raise an eyebrow. Nobody eats grass except pandas and critters with hooves, eh?

        *shrug* I'm presumably not the expert you're looking for, but you asked, so there you have it.
        "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

        Comment


        • #5
          Anything labeled 'Superfood' is a con, and by the look of it, expensive ones at that.
          Yesterday it was Goji berries, today its dehydrated ground up kelp and broccoli. What next...
          You'll probably get the same (and much cheaper) result from a good multivitamin.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bostonbully View Post
            I do not eat blue green algae, Spirulina, Chlorella, or seaweed to name a few.
            .
            What makes you think you need to?

            Comment


            • #7
              They can call it whatever they want really because I'm not buying it because of the name. Why do I think I need too? Well i guess for the same reason I think I need to eat spinach. I know it has vitamins and minerals in it that are good for me and I guess I just feel that it would be healthy. I know a gut feeling isn't very scientific but it is what it is.

              I don't buy into the goji berry, acai berry, pomegranate or whatever being the end all to health but I do think they are healthy foods that should be consumed. I just don't go to the store to buy them thinking I'm buying the fountain of youth.

              In the end I believe a wide variety of foods is going to give you a better over all vitamin and mineral profile. The green "super foods" just so happen to have many different foods I believe to be healthy foods in them that would broaden my food intake.

              If someone comes on here and says hey X food is not good for you and here is the research then I will gladly say thank you and not consume it. Which back to the origional reason I posted this was to get feedback on the three supplements I have considered. Or even one I haven't ever seen before that may be better.
              Last edited by Bostonbully; 04-04-2011, 05:30 PM.
              "Live Free or Die"

              Comment


              • #8
                That's fair enough. I just think it's an expensive way to go about it.
                You only need apply your own logic to get an answer.
                'If someone comes on here and says hey X food is not good for you and here is the research then I will gladly say thank you and not consume it'.
                I'll go out on a limb and say none of these supp companys back up their claims of vital health with research either.

                They won't kill you, so if spending $54.95 on a little bottle of dried herb's with virtually trace elements of anything useful in them seems worth it to you, go for it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I just noticed the damn thread says green good not food. What the hell.

                  Anyways thanks for your opinion.
                  "Live Free or Die"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You could do a trial run with all three of the supplements you mentioned and see how you feel on them. Let us know the results- I'm curious!

                    I take a spirulina/women's multi-vitamin supplement because I probably don't have as balanced of a diet as I should and I know I'm not taking in enough of what I need through my food and I don't *ever* eat organ meats. In fact, I probably don't eat nearly enough meat. (You can blame my dad for terrible force feeds at the table as a child.) I know a supplement isn't the answer, but I like to think it at least helps.
                    "It may be normal darling, but I'd rather be natural." -Holly Golightly

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Biotest Superfood is a lot better tasting (and nutrition/food wise IMO) then and of that lawn clippings, hippie horseshit. It's made from fruits and vegetables, you know, shit we eat. It's just freeze dried. Works great in tea and gives it sort of a berry flavor. I use it in greek yogurt and PWO shakes sometimes.
                      People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by IcarianVX View Post
                        Biotest Superfood is a lot better tasting (and nutrition/food wise IMO) then and of that lawn clippings, hippie horseshit. It's made from fruits and vegetables, you know, shit we eat. It's just freeze dried. Works great in tea and gives it sort of a berry flavor. I use it in greek yogurt and PWO shakes sometimes.
                        Thank you I'll check it out.
                        "Live Free or Die"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My apologies for being so late to this party. I've been reading the MDA blog off and on for around six months, but I'm new to the forums and just discovered this thread in a search for posts about chlorella. This is a topic that became of interest to me several years ago, about the time I started moving away from the SAD (Yay!) but into my whole-grain-dominated near-vegetarian phase (Boo!), and I have at least a passing familiarity with some of these products.

                          They're a great concept. Like Bostonbully, I was looking for a convenient way to increase the variety of fruits and veggies I ate, and I badly wanted to believe their claims. At one time or another, I tried quite a few of them (roughly in order from least- to most-used): ORAC-Energy Greens (which tasted awful to me, but it was the exception; the rest ranged from pretty good to downright tasty), Midori Greens, Amazing Grass Green SuperFood, Macro Greens, Miracle Reds, Juvo Raw Super Food, Boku Superfood, Udo's Choice Green Blend, Vitamineral Green, Super Meal Rx, Berry Green, Earth's Promise, Juvo Natural Raw Meal, and Udo's Choice Wholesome Fast Food.

                          I can't fully and fairly judge how well these products worked for me, for two reasons: 1) any of them was an improvement over my old way of eating, and 2) I never used many of them for very long, often switching from whichever was my current favorite as soon as I discovered another that caught my fancy.

                          I really liked some of these products and used several of them for quite a while, but I was never free from a niggling uncertainty when it came to cost vs. benefit. Some of them made claims so extravagant that they bordered on the magical, and the prices of most of them tended to reflect that. The descriptions of Pure Synergy, for example, fascinated me, but I could never quite bring myself to actually drop the coin necessary to try it because it was so damn expensive.

                          On top of that, some of these products, even though they provide impressive lists of ingredients, have no nutritional information label at all (I'm looking at you, Vitamineral Green). Others have the label but supply paltry information about their micronutrient content (e.g., Pure Synergy). Still others supply adequate detail about micronutrient content which nevertheless seems unexpectedly, even disappointingly, low considering the ingredients from which they're made (e.g., Berry Green).

                          This post is already long and getting much longer, and I apologize for that, but an especially enlightening perspective on cost/benefit analysis came to me several years ago from New Chapter, the makers of Berry Green, in response to a question I sent them about how Berry Green compares to actual fruits and veggies. My question: How many servings of fruits and vegetables does one tablespoon of Berry Green equal? Their representative's response:
                          Thank you for your question. I have included a lengthy answer to offer more interesting information for you regarding Berry Green.

                          It would take 26 tablespoons of another leading greens powder to provide an equivalent amount of true greens and fruits provided in just one tablespoon of Berry Green.

                          Now let's explore the very complex serving equivalency issue. One serving of Berry Green is approximately equal to one generous serving of combined dark green leafy greens and berries. Since greens and berries are calculated differently, we can use the most plentiful ingredient, spinach, as the best example. It takes 12 pounds of certified organic fresh spinach to produce 1 pound of CO freeze dried spinach. A 6 gram serving (of this vegetable) would therefore deliver the equivalent of 72 grams of fresh spinach. One serving or one cup of spinach weighs approximately 56 grams. A serving of CO blueberry, the most plentiful fruit in Berry Green, weighs in at approximately 72 grams, which would also be very close to the freeze dried ratio if the serving were exclusively 6 grams of blueberry. Remember that with this entire calculation one would have to source the finest possible certified organic greens and fruits and have quality health markers associated with them. Also one would have to culture and source the additional certified organic 15 greens and fruits and then probiotically culture them with ten live strains. This adds an activity which is very difficult, if not impossible, to measure an equivalent to. Finally, one would also have to prepare the food in such a way to maximally preserve both the phytonutrients and the fiber. No one else in the industry is doing this. Also, do not be misled by the companies promoting grass juice concentrates and claiming 5+ servings, because a) there is no real equivalent to eating grass in the diet, and b) how can it really be equivalent when the important fibers are completely removed?

                          In summary, one serving of Berry Green provides the equivalent of one generous serving of a wide array of perfectly grown, certified organic, greens and fruits, probiotically cultured and prepared to maximally deliver phytonutrients and beneficial fiber. By way of comparison, another leading greens powder (which delivers predominantly grass juice concentrate) offers only 225 mg of true greens and fruits per tablespoon. Compare this with 5880 mg. of true greens and berries in every tablespoon of Berry Green. In conclusion you would have to take 26 tablespoons of this other greens product to provide the amount of true greens and fruits in just one serving of Berry Green.

                          I hope this information will be helpful for you. I wish you well on your path to good health and vitality.

                          And I hope the length of this comment doesn't break the forum.

                          So one serving (one tablespoon) of Berry Green equals, disregarding the mumbo jumbo, only about one serving of mixed fruits and veggies. And that tablespoon costs about a dollar, even from the least expensive internet source I've found. For only 88¢, I can get a 12-oz. package of store brand frozen veggies at my local Kroger in any of a number of varieties. Sure, they're not organic or anything, but that 88¢ gets me four servings of veggies. That's enough to base a meal on.

                          From where I stand now, there's not much of a contest. The superfood formulas have only one obvious advantage: convenience. And I'm no longer convinced the convenience they offer is worth that kind of cost.

                          Finally, my experiences with these superfood formulas did manage to give me one interesting back-to-back comparison when it came to detecting a measurable physical effect. Background: For quite some time, off and on, I've been using a little chlorella and spirulina as two of the ingredients in my daily breakfast drink. I still do, because they have a few advantages over the other products I've been talking about: they're arguably whole foods; they're backed up by decades of, if not conclusive, at least abundant and very promising research; they have nice quantities of micronutrients; and they give every appearance of offering much more bang for the buck than the superfood formulas mentioned above.

                          In other words, they don't come across as magic pixie dust.

                          Anyway, sometime last year, I succumbed to the siren song of Vitamineral Green (touted by many as the most serious and powerful superfood formula in existence). Despite its hardcore reputation, it actually tasted pretty good, so I decided to replace my chlorella and spirulina with an equal quantity of Vitamineral Green (at that time, three tablespoons a day). After a while with this routine (a couple of months, maybe more), I felt as good as ever, but when I went to donate blood I was deferred because my iron was too low. Just to be clear, I was not anemic. My iron was not low enough to be a medical problem. It was only low enough to keep me from donating blood.

                          That was annoying and a bit alarming, because I've been donating regularly for nearly 30 years. I thought about it and decided that the most likely explanation was a dietary change, and the only recent and significant change in my diet was the substitution of Vitamineral Green for chlorella and spirulina, both of which contain lots of iron. So the very next day I dropped the Vitamineral Green and went back to the chlorella and spirulina, and a week or two later my iron was back up and I could donate again.

                          Of course, that was all well before I discovered MDA at the beginning of this year and started eating in a much more primal fashion. Now I use only half as much chlorella and spirulina as before, no superfood formulas at all, only a fraction of the supplements I used to, and a lot more animal foods. Overall I think I'm eating much better for a little less money. I'm between doctors, so I don't have the blood tests to prove it; but as far as how I look and feel are concerned, I'm doing great, better than I have for many years.

                          Make of this what you will. It's just one guy's opinion. But I hope it's food for thought.



                          P.S.: I didn't want to bog my first post down with a multitude of links, but anyone who's curious can find most of the products mentioned above at iherb.com. Just search for the names there to turn up ingredients lists, nutritional information, user reviews, and links to the manufacturers' web sites. For the rest, there's your search engine of choice and, of course, the links provided by Bostonbully and IcarianVX.

                          P.P.S.: I'll try to be less prolix in the future. But no promises.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Check these guys out AmazingGrass.com I took their Amazing Meal for a couple years... a bit pricey (you can get cheaper by looking around) but was ok taste and mixed well. Or just get a masticating jucier (Omega 6000 series) an jucie some wheat grass shots!
                            Living the dream, inside a myth

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              So one serving (one tablespoon) of Berry Green equals, disregarding the mumbo jumbo, only about one serving of mixed fruits and veggies. And that tablespoon costs about a dollar, even from the least expensive internet source I've found. For only 88¢, I can get a 12-oz. package of store brand frozen veggies at my local Kroger in any of a number of varieties. Sure, they're not organic or anything, but that 88¢ gets me four servings of veggies. That's enough to base a meal on.
                              Exactly. And those are actual veggies at that.
                              “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
                              Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X