Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone feeding a large family primally?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anyone feeding a large family primally?

    I'm part of a family of 6, including two teenage boys who are perpetually hungry. One of my biggest obstacles in going whole hog with PB is the fact that we have so many mouths to feed on a single income. Does anyone in a similar position have some tips for feeding a large family, PB style, on a fairly slim food budget?
    Tara



  • #2
    I'm interested in following this thread when it gets off the ground. I'm feeding a family of 5. This week is the first week that the dinners will all be primal but the after school time I still bought crap for them. My biggest obstacles are getting them to comply and having 1 vegetarian teen.
    My Journal
    sigpic

    Comment


    • #3
      I feed a family of 5 as well. I am the only truly primal one, 2 are about 80% primal and the other 2 fight me. The 2 that fight me, i just tell them that as long as they live under my roof, they will eat what I prepare/buy and until they contribute to the grocery budget, live with it.
      Georgette

      Comment


      • #4
        Getting your kids off grains and sugar = they will not be eating ALL the time. They will not need to nor will they want to. This includes your teenage boys who will lose the "perpetual hungriness".

        Mine eat breakfast at 7-7:15
        They get school lunch at 9:50 (ridiculous, I know, this will change at their new school thank goodness)
        2:45 they get off the bus and sometimes want a snack but not every single day.
        6-6:30 is dinner time

        occasionally they want something before they get ready for bed but this is not an every night thing.

        They are growing boys for sure but compare them to any kids in the neighborhood, of all ages, they are the only 2 that aren't constantly eating. I save $$ just on that alone.

        My first tip is to add up everything you spend on non-primal stuff. Then dedicate ALL that to the primal budget and you might not find the difference to be that drastic.

        Comment


        • #5
          I just have one very hungry husband, but I was out of work for a few months last year and was being very austere in my grocery spending. I didn't know how long I was going to be unemployed so I was spending for the worst case scenario. I know what it's like to stretch a dollar.

          We ate a lot of big, cheaper cuts of meat like brisket and pork shoulder. An hour in a pressure cooker will make those fall-apart tender. Stews are awesome, too.

          We already had a CSA going for produce but if you have a little space to plant, that's the cheapest source right there. Put those boys to work! Also, I used to be in the habit of showing up at the farmer's market in the last half hour. Lots of the sellers will mark stuff down at that point to clear out as much as they can.

          Shop sales and freeze. The blog post today mentioned a good way to wrap meat so it doesn't get freezer burned.

          Lots of people here cowpool. If you have a big freezer, it can be very economical.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DaisyEater View Post
            I just have one very hungry husband, but I was out of work for a few months last year and was being very austere in my grocery spending. I didn't know how long I was going to be unemployed so I was spending for the worst case scenario. I know what it's like to stretch a dollar.

            We ate a lot of big, cheaper cuts of meat like brisket and pork shoulder. An hour in a pressure cooker will make those fall-apart tender. Stews are awesome, too.

            We already had a CSA going for produce but if you have a little space to plant, that's the cheapest source right there. Put those boys to work! Also, I used to be in the habit of showing up at the farmer's market in the last half hour. Lots of the sellers will mark stuff down at that point to clear out as much as they can.

            Shop sales and freeze. The blog post today mentioned a good way to wrap meat so it doesn't get freezer burned.

            Lots of people here cowpool. If you have a big freezer, it can be very economical.
            I second the cowpooling. Also you can buy organic blueberries/strawberries/avocados in bulk from Costco. My Costco also has organic ground beef and chicken but we normally don't get it since it is a little too much for me to eat in a weeks time. But like others have said, just as long as the kids are off of sodas/fruit juice/processed snack foods and fast foods that is half the battle right there.
            "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

            People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DaisyEater View Post
              Also, I used to be in the habit of showing up at the farmer's market in the last half hour. Lots of the sellers will mark stuff down at that point to clear out as much as they can.
              This is a great tip -- many sellers drop prices 50% or more, and I've even gotten some items for free this way. The downside, obviously, is that it may not be exactly the produce you were looking for, but that may force you to get creative.
              Everything in moderation, including moderation.

              Comment


              • #8
                Subbing in here . We're a family of 6 (my kids are 14, 12, 8 and almost 6). I'm just working on transitioning myself at the moment but we already make sure the kids gets good protein at every meal, which can get pricey.
                Gluten intolerance and hypermobility syndrome http://www.cfids.org/pdf/joint-hypermobility-guide.pdf

                Eat food. Mostly real. Enjoy life.

                Health, energy, wellbeing, vitality, joy, LIFE! Health At Every Size

                "Do not ask what the world needs; ask yourself what makes you come alive. And then go and do that, because what the world needs is people who have come alive."
                Harold Whitman

                Comment


                • #9
                  My wife and I feed a family of 9 mainly primally (18 boy, 14 boy, 13 girl, 10 boy, 6 girl, 4 boy, 2 boy). We found that the bill was lower when we went primal, although we are not completely grass feed and organic yet.

                  We have chosen to lower the cost by buying a cow (I am fortunate to live in a farming community so we are paying $2.25 a pound bagged and ready to freeze + I get a cow hide out of it). We also have been raising our own chickens for meat and eggs. Additionally we grow our own food and we purchase from two separate CSAs. We found farmers that would let us negotiate the amounts in the delivery since we consume so much.

                  In order to lower the bill I calculated the net protein intake needed for each one of us and we purchase (supplement) the amount of meat we need each week at the grocer with conventional meat and wild fish. We currently use 25-30 pounds of meat a week. I then calculated out the amount of vegis and fruit we needed/ used (we do not restrict the kids). We purchase potatoes (10lbs russet, 5lbs red or white, 10 sweet). We do use rice and non-gluten flours for the kids and fermented soy products. We sweeten with fruits or sweet potatoes and we purchase spices.

                  We currently spend $250-300 a week including a night out for dinner once a week at a local restaurant.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Apologetik View Post
                    My wife and I feed a family of 9 mainly primally (18 boy, 14 boy, 13 girl, 10 boy, 6 girl, 4 boy, 2 boy). We found that the bill was lower when we went primal, although we are not completely grass feed and organic yet.

                    We have chosen to lower the cost by buying a cow (I am fortunate to live in a farming community so we are paying $2.25 a pound bagged and ready to freeze + I get a cow hide out of it). We also have been raising our own chickens for meat and eggs. Additionally we grow our own food and we purchase from two separate CSAs. We found farmers that would let us negotiate the amounts in the delivery since we consume so much.

                    In order to lower the bill I calculated the net protein intake needed for each one of us and we purchase (supplement) the amount of meat we need each week at the grocer with conventional meat and wild fish. We currently use 25-30 pounds of meat a week. I then calculated out the amount of vegis and fruit we needed/ used (we do not restrict the kids). We purchase potatoes (10lbs russet, 5lbs red or white, 10 sweet). We do use rice and non-gluten flours for the kids and fermented soy products. We sweeten with fruits or sweet potatoes and we purchase spices.

                    We currently spend $250-300 a week including a night out for dinner once a week at a local restaurant.
                    You're my hero! I would LOVE to be able to do some of the things you've done; keep chickens, grow stuff, etc. Unfortunately, I live in suburbia, in a pretty harsh growing climate that makes it difficult to garden. But I'm definitely inspired by your post!

                    And I know that by removing the junk, the hunger will definitely reduce. My hubby has seen a pretty dramatic drop in his appetite since he went completely Primal a few weeks ago.

                    Thanks so much for all the tips, everyone!
                    Tara


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Are there ranchers where you live in the Rockies (or close enough)?

                      I get my beef from a local conventional rancher who was more then happy to leave a cow or two on the side for me. He just leaves it on grass for a longer period to get the weight up and he saves on antibiotics since I do not need them. My cow never touches a feed lot and he benefits since I pay almost double the price that he gets at wholesale.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Wow, apologetik, that is a big family! Glad you can make primal work for so many, it's inspiring. I want a big family, but I really worry about money. It seems like I can either have a job and make good money but have no time for a family, or no job and no money but plenty of time for a big family. It's a conundrum...

                        Speaking of time, how long did it take you to work out what you needed for primal shopping? How long to find good sources?
                        Type 1 Diabetic. Controlling blood sugar through primal life.

                        2012 Goals:
                        Maintain A1c of 6.0 or lower
                        More dietary fat, less carbs, moderate protein
                        LHT and sprint as per PB fitness
                        Play more!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The time and money thing has always been a problem

                          Fortunately, I found a job in academia; I get paid well and I do not have to work as many hours as in other sectors of the economy (BTW-Can you tell I am an economist?).

                          As to how long it took to find out what we needed to buy--I am anal about the food budget with our household (before and after Primal). What I did was calculate the amount of lean body mass I and my wife are shooting for and calculated protein needs, I estimated .7-1 gram of protein per growing child's body weight. For my two teenage sons who are athletes I allocated 1.5-2 grams of protein per pound of lean body mass. The vegis and fruit reflected past purchasing habits.

                          The hardest part for everyone was giving up gluten (most grain) products and reducing grains and dairy.

                          As to sourcing products we are lucky to have multiple friends who are ranchers and growers. We currently are receiving free organic free range chickens from a friend who raises for a national chain store. (Due to the contract he raises under they take what they need for market and he is not allowed to sell the extras and is expected to use them or dispose of them out of the market place.)

                          As to the beef I have a former student who is a cattle rancher and I asked him if he would be willing to host a cow for me every year, thus far it has worked out. We use half of the cow and we split the rest with others in order to lower our cost for the meat.

                          My biggest suggestion would be to find a local feed store and meet some farmers, get your kids involved in 4H/ FFA and talk to the families involved. We do have a nice property with one acre and 12 fruit trees that are established which helps. But, we are envious of our friends (not primal) who have 8500 acres and raise cattle and grow feed crops. Ohh what we could do with that acreage.

                          Joel

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I feed a family of 6, 13yo boy, 11yo boy, 5yo girl, 2yo boy and my oldest spends holidays and summers with us, 16yo girl. We typically spend $250 - $300/week, but we don't have a source for good grass-fed beef yet. I'm looking for goat breeders too, we used to eat goat when we raised them and it's just as tasty as beef and easy for me to butcher. We do have a large garden and will be getting our eggs from a friend who managed to see their chickens through the winter. Mine didn't make it, it was neighboring dogs, not the cold that got them.

                            Out here, it's really hard to find the good stuff, we don't have many cattle ranchers in the area and no stores similar to whole foods or trader joes.

                            Btw, I'm a stay at home mom, just my husband works. We don't do any grains and avoid as much sugar as possible, so it can be done, just takes planning or for me, a lot of determination.
                            Start of PB weight Aug/2011: 217
                            Start of Leptin Reset end of Aug/2011: 202.4
                            current weight: 199.6

                            Follow me and see what my kids are eating for lunch.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I just wanted to add that contacting a local Weston A. Price group in your area (even if you are not a member) is an EXCELLENT way to meet local organic farmers in your area and find out the best places/prices for local grass-fed meat etc. because you can bet they have already done the leg work on all that.
                              Jennifer
                              My Primal Success Story!
                              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-w...#axzz1ip4rJuDH

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X