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Is honey paleo?

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  • Is honey paleo?

    Didn't our ancestors gorge on honey when they found it? Just curious.

  • #2
    it depends on which ancestors and where they were from, but, yeah, honey would have been a once-in-a-while delicacy when they could get it.
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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    • #3
      Those who could get it, but if you are a carb craver, beware. I can do about a teaspoon, and no more.
      This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it. Ralph Waldo Emerson

      Any given day you are surrounded by 10,000 idiots.
      Lao Tsu, founder of Taoism

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      • #4
        Of course it's paleo. Yes, you're right. Hunter/gatherers would take honey. But that doesn't mean you should regularly. It was a rare treat.
        carl's cave

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        • #5
          The massai still seek out honey combs in Kenya. Of course it is 'Paleo', but it is not easy to get, and the massai eat the actual combs, and i would say most of what is available in shops is processed heavily.

          It was definitely never meant for everyday, mass consumption.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Honeybear View Post
            Didn't our ancestors gorge on honey when they found it?
            thats the thing. Trouble is, less than a 5' walk from where I am typing I can buy tons of the stuff. Now if I had to find/follow the bees, climb a tree to get to the hive, light a fire then smoke 'em a bit to make 'em sleepy, get stung (quite) a few times getting the honey, climb back down and then trek home - yep it'd be paleo

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            • #7
              By a strict definition of "a food that was available to pre-agriculture humans", then yes, it would have been occasionally eaten by people living in parts of the world where the honey bee was found.

              If you're talking about eating as much of it as you want as part of a paleo/PB lifestyle because it meets the above definition, then no. A tenet of this WOE is to minimize insulin spikes in response to sugary foods, and honey is certainly a sugary food.

              That said, my husband and I have a hive in our backyard and I do eat a teaspoon of honey from time to time and enjoy it, because OMG it's the best honey I've ever had.

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              • #8
                It depends on whether your definition is "any food that ancient man ate" or "food that is good for you because we are evolved to benefit from eating it regularly." The second way is less sound-bite friendly but it's what you really should think of.
                Honey is a form of sugar and should be treated as such - I use it occasionally in moderation.
                If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/ and this (personal fave): http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

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                • #9
                  All of the above--and I wouldn't touch it if you are losing weight. Great way to create an insulin spike and stop fat loss.
                  Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                  Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                  Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
                    All of the above--and I wouldn't touch it if you are losing weight. Great way to create an insulin spike and stop fat loss.
                    I think a tiny amount (like a teaspoon) drizzled on a nice SMALL peice of fruit would be a good treat after a protein/fat based meal....and only once a month.

                    I do this and it has not hurt my weight loss any.

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                    • #11
                      Our ancestors would gain quite a bit of calories from eating honey, but they would burn off a lot of it running away from the angry bees.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
                        All of the above--and I wouldn't touch it if you are losing weight. Great way to create an insulin spike and stop fat loss.
                        I believe that honey (along with agave nectar) are mostly fructose and actually don't cause much of an insulin spike (in comparison with things with a high GI) but your point is the same. Instead of it causing an insulin spike, it just gets converted to fat right away by the liver, thus stopping any lipolysis since there is ample amounts in the bloodstream.
                        People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by canadianwoman View Post
                          I think a tiny amount (like a teaspoon) drizzled on a nice SMALL peice of fruit would be a good treat after a protein/fat based meal....and only once a month.

                          I do this and it has not hurt my weight loss any.
                          That's fine if you aren't a sugar addict, like me!
                          Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
                          Pregnancy Nutrition Coaching
                          Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
                            That's fine if you aren't a sugar addict, like me!
                            Ditto that.

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                            • #15
                              Watching BBC's 'Human Planet' series, there were a few scenes of traditional honey-gathering. A couple of boys following the honey bird for I-forget-how-long before finding the hive. A group who traversed swamps full of man-eating tigers before smoking out the hives. And my favourite, the man who spent over an hour climbing some 40 metres straight up a rainforest tree trunk (that's how far it was to the first branch), using a hatchet to make footholds all the way up, because his wife hadn't had honey in a long time. At the top, he walked out along a branch (no handholds here), hauled up a bunch of smoking leaves that were supposed to dope the bees, hacked his way into the hive and reached out huge honeycombs. Most were lowered to the bottom, where wife and children devoured great handfuls of the stuff; he squatted on his branch surrounded by angry bees and chomped down happily.

                              So there you go - gorging on whole honeycombs is entirely authentically Paleo. Just as soon as I can climb 40 metres straight up without break, I'll be sure to do so.

                              (There were some truly astonishingly fit people on that series... and their expectations of older people seem to be a bit different from ours. It's the 65 year old leads the three men who bluff 15 lions off their kill; the 70+ year old climbs down the well to excavate the connecting tunnel through the rock between two wells, before - as far as I could see - 'walking' back up the narrow shaft with his feet braced on opposite walls.)

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