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Incorrect claim about Olive Oil in PB?

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  • #16
    1



    Hey-can't we all just use butter and get along?

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    • #17
      1



      Science education has been known to promote, in some cases, severe social handicaps in people. Or was it a bad sex life? I am not sure...

      “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
      "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
      "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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      • #18
        1



        Wait. A bad sex life isn't a severe social handicap?

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        • #19
          1



          I meant bad sex life as a cause.


          It would appear that science education has made me linguistically handicapped.

          “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
          "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
          "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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          • #20
            1



            Oo, is this our first popcorn-worthy thread? (As in, grab a bucket of popcorn and watch the drama unfold.) English skills are being criticized, surely the grammar police are on their way!


            Just kidding; I really think that this (so far) has been a unique forum in that the majority of posters are genuinely trying to share knowledge versus engage in flame wars. Or maybe I have just trolled too many childish forums in the past.


            On topic, however, olive does smoke for me sometimes at really high heat (I generally prefer to sautι and fry things with coconut oil). Am I just doing something wrong? Plus I agree that the flavor of olive oil is severly compromised when heated. I much prefer to put olive oil on my veggies after steaming them to get the full flavor.

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            • #21
              1



              I would make the popcorn right now if it wasn't full of carbs!

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              • #22
                1



                Primal Popcorn is made of air-heated ticks.


                Hrm . . .


                Now there's a recipe I'd like to see on MDA!

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                • #23
                  1



                  As many have noted the delicate taste of olive oil is lost in high heat cooking. This is the main reason I reserve it for other uses.


                  These may be of interest to this discussion:


                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/oil-fat-overheat-smoking-point/


                  http://www.fitnessspotlight.com/2008/05/29/ten-oils-and-how-to-use-them/


                  Notice I say "choose extra virgin" and "savor the flavor". (Part of the PB is truly enjoying and appreciating the good food we eat. I think the best way to enjoy olive oil is at room temp.)


                  The smoking point of extra virgin olive oil is actually around 320 degrees fahrenheit - much lower than virgin olive oil and lower than butter, coconut oil, lard and others. (320 is a hot pan indeed but can be reached fairly easily when sauteeing. I've personally seen olive oil smoke on many occasions. Also, 310-320 or so is about the temp you see the Maillard reaction take place - the temp at which caramelization occurs. So I wouldn't recommend using EVOO while attempting to sear meat.) I should add that the smoking point of EVOO is a bit confusing too since you'll find different smoking points from one manufacturer to the next. In general the less the oil has been processed (the oil I'm interested in eating) the lower the smoking point. Also, the more impurities in the oil (impurities often mean more flavor - fruitiness, for example - also the kind of OO I'm interested in) the lower the smoking point.


                  The statement really is about the flavor and that there are fats to cook with that are just as healthy (or even healthier... not to mention cheaper). With that said, high quality extra virgin olive oil can have low smoking points and would best be avoided for very high heat cooking applications. Check your bottles.


                  Though it's just an abstract, this may be of interest as well:


                  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19166297?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez. Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPan el.Pubmed_RVDocSum


                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oleocanthal


                  I hope that helps.

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                  • #24
                    1



                    Lard can be used for in place of olive oil in almost all situations. The only reasons I can think of using EVOO, are taste or when you require a liquid at room temperature.


                    Personally, I do not use any oils for cooking.

                    The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                    • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                    • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                    • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

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                    • #25
                      1



                      Tarlach- do you use lard from grassfed pigs or any old lard? (we were talking about this in another thread-- since pigs are omnivores, are grassfed pigs necessary to make good lard?)

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                      • #26
                        1



                        I get pig fat from a reputable butcher, that always has very high quality meat (and butchers the whole carcass).


                        Pigs aren't designed to eat just grass, so grass-fed is not a necessity. However, they aren't meant to survive on just corn either

                        The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                        • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                        • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                        • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          1



                          Instead of trying to find a reputable butcher and rendering my own, I bought some lard online from an merchant featuring organic and pasture raised products.


                          But tell me, isn't pig lard mostly monounsaturated fat? That's what I'm understanding!

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                          • #28
                            1



                            According to Wikipedia


                            Lard:


                            Saturated fats 38–43%:

                            - Palmitic acid: 25–28%

                            - Stearic acid: 12–14%

                            - Myristic acid: 1%

                            Unsaturated fats 56–62%

                            Monounsaturated fats 47–50%:

                            - Oleic acid: 44–47%

                            - Palmitoleic acid: 3%

                            Polyunsaturated fats

                            - Linoleic acid: 6–10%


                            If you buy lard from a normal shop:

                            The lard should be soft to the touch when in the fridge (softer than butter). If it is rock hard in the fridge then it has been hydrogenated and contains transfats.

                            The "Seven Deadly Sins"

                            • Grains (wheat/rice/oats etc) . . . . . • Dairy (milk/yogurt/butter/cheese etc) . . . . .• Nightshades (peppers/tomato/eggplant etc)
                            • Tubers (potato/arrowroot etc) . . . • Modernly palatable (cashews/olives etc) . . . • Refined foods (salt/sugars etc )
                            • Legumes (soy/beans/peas etc)

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              1



                              Has anyone tried leaf lard (fat lining the abdomen and kidneys in hogs)? I want to purchase some over the net.

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                              • #30
                                1



                                Leaf Lard IS good, but I think well-rendered tallow works too. The point of buying leaf lard is to BAKE since it has a neutral flavor, and since we dont [usually] bake in PB I guess the point is moot. But if youre looking bake here and there... I would go for the leaf lard


                                The main topic: EVOO?

                                I think the different smoke points might be that olive oils have been shown to be impure in a large portion of manufacturers. This should help:


                                http://www.cheeseslave.com/2008/03/2...oil-challenge/

                                Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

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