Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nitrates... not so bad after all?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nitrates... not so bad after all?



    I've seen lately some posts in different blogs and articles, about the no link between nitrates and brain tumors.


    http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2009/10/some-interesting-links.html


    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33025612/ns/health-cancer/


    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/161496.php


    Seems that cured bacon isn't that bad after all right?

    Is it nitrate free bacon better?


    I have a the moment in my fridge a pack of nitrate-free free range bacon and normal free range bacon.


    I actually had a rasher of each this morning.


    Taste wise I prefer normal bacon than nitrate-free. Also nitrate-free stinks while cooking! (and brings not very nice comments from my flatmates...) It is also a much stronger taste, which I don't dislike at all, but I like much more the normal one.


    What you think?


  • #2
    1



    by the way, the normal bacon I have is uncured...

    Comment


    • #3
      1



      But, of course, they have to stick in the CW, all evidence to the contrary be damned.


      "Even if there is no connection to glioma risk, though, there are still plenty of other health reasons to limit red and processed meats in the diet, Michaud pointed out. Studies have linked high intakes to a number of diseases, including heart disease and colon, stomach and breast cancers."

      Comment


      • #4
        1



        Hmm...Why do they group red and processed in the same category?


        I can't believe that nitrates don't carry some sort of ill effect. They're PRESERVATIVES after all, unnatural, manmade creation, and isn't that the total opposite of primal eating?

        On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

        Comment


        • #5
          1



          Jess, so is salt..........

          Comment


          • #6
            1



            OTB salt is not manmade at all! Natural sea salt is harvested in France and other places just like any other mineral. Morton's is processed, but we've had that discussion before

            You are what you eat,
            and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan

            Comment


            • #7
              1



              That's my point, hannahc. If I read her correctly, her issue was with preservatives generally, and that at least salt qualifies as natural and hence, not man made.

              Comment


              • #8
                1



                Nitrates are probably not horrible... aren't there natural nitrate in other foods?? (Like celery).

                Salt is natural. It is in seafood. I haven't found sufficient evidence that even excess salt does anything. And seriously, there are other things that raise blood pressure, so don't even bring up that one... unless you legitimately have evidence that it is the salt and not the fructose, inflammation, etc. As far as I know there are no studies that can differentiate.

                Comment


                • #9
                  1



                  Isn't there some salt in animal meat anyway? I don't see any big issue with the stuff either, mooooderation as they say, just don't douse your foods in it obviously. Ah man, disgusting...

                  On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    1



                    Isn't it really a question of concentration? Sea salt is a natural substance. There may be naturally occurring nitrites in celery and naturally occurring salts in meats too. Still in their natural state those nitrates and meat-salts exist in nowhere near the concentrations they are found in "processed" meats. Even sprinkling sea salt on food to season it doesn't raise the concentration to the levels of processed meats. Too little salt is no good for our bodies, but it's hard for me to think there isn't an amount that is excessive. After all, the reason salt is used as a preservative is because its applied at levels that have a toxic dehydrating effect on bacteria and fungi.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      1



                      Well said, Geoff...Makes me second-guess buying the grocery store's bacon...

                      On a mission to help others master movement, build unbreakable strength, & eat MORE food (can't beat that.) Weekly fitness, health & nutrition articles at indulgentfitness.com.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        1



                        http://junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/2008/07/does-banning-hotdogs-and-bacon-make.html


                        Higher levels of nitrates occur naturally in vegetables than what is used to cure meat?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          1



                          Wow. It's settled then. That article must have had 40 cited courses. Great!

                          I am not afraid of nitrates/nitrites any longer after reading that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            1



                            interesting website musajen . Have you read any of her articles on why its not unhealthy to be obese?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              1



                              Not so fast people! Nitrates and Nitrites can apparently react with the proteins in meat to produce nitrosamines. And nitrosamines are believed to be strong cancer precursors.


                              I think it's still a good idea to avoid them.

                              “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                              "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                              "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X