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Supplements for insulin control?

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  • Supplements for insulin control?

    I'm thinking about starting myself on ALA and Ceylon cinnamon to help with my blood sugar. I keep having issues with spikes and crashes even though I've been primal for a month with minimal fruit/sugar. Are there any other supplements I should look into to help with it? Thanks!

  • #2
    I would do a little reading beforehand since I'm obviously not a doctor who can prescribe/recommend stuff, but my dad is diabetic and takes GTF Chromium and says it helps.

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    • #3
      You know I used to take Chromium, but I finally connected it with headaches I was having. Appreciate the suggestion tho!

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      • #4
        A spoonful of cinnamon sugar (wet with water) every morning should help. I've never heard of Ceylon cinnamon... does that mean that the cinnamon comes from Sri Lanka? I know that when my mother would give me cinnamon every morning, the cinnamon powder was from India.

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        • #5
          Ceylon is supposed to be the "true" cinnamon and apparently cassia has been connected to liver toxicity amongst other problems yet that's what most cinnamon supplements are comprised of ironically enough. Ceylon is the only one supposed to be used for blood sugar stabilization.

          Wouldn't the sugar mixed with the cinnamon defeat the purpose? I mean sugar is what is driving my blood sugar crazy and causing my crashes right?

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          • #6
            Oops that was a typo haha. It should be just cinnamon... it was too early in the morning! Yeah, just cinnamon, LOL.

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            • #7
              Vanadium and zinc are suppose to be good for blood sugar control. What form and how much chromium were you taking?

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              • #8
                Although sometimes my mother would give me the cinnamon mixed with a little bit of honey, which is the traditional ayurvedic way of treating insulin resistance or diabetes. That also seems counter-intuitive, though, thinking about it, since honey = sugar.

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                • #9
                  LOL...you had me worried there for a second Imasin!

                  KBN1, I was taking this http://www.vitacost.com/Natures-Plus...-Sugar-Control

                  And how much zinc for sugar control? I know I get some in my multivitamin, but I'm sure it's not enough to make a difference. Thanks!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by imasin View Post
                    Although sometimes my mother would give me the cinnamon mixed with a little bit of honey, which is the traditional ayurvedic way of treating insulin resistance or diabetes. That also seems counter-intuitive, though, thinking about it, since honey = sugar.
                    I've heard of the honey thing for diabetics actually. And if I use sugar in anything I try to make sure it is raw honey. For some reason it's rumored not supposed to affect your insulin levels as much. I'm with you tho...sugar is sugar imo.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Goldensparrow View Post
                      You know I used to take Chromium, but I finally connected it with headaches I was having. Appreciate the suggestion tho!
                      From what I understand, GTF chromium is different than just regular chromium. Not sure if you were taking regular or GTF chromium...? Might be worth looking into.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Goldensparrow View Post
                        Ceylon is supposed to be the "true" cinnamon and apparently cassia has been connected to liver toxicity amongst other problems yet that's what most cinnamon supplements are comprised of ironically enough. Ceylon is the only one supposed to be used for blood sugar stabilization.
                        Most of the studies, including the original studies showing the benefits of cinnamon on blood sugar were done using "cinnamon cassia"
                        Both types of cinnamon have shown beneficial effects.

                        From the studies i have read, it only takes a bit of cinnamon with your meal to have a positive effect. And no published study showing liver problems from consuming cinnamon in moderation. One study done on rodents actually showed that it protected the liver.

                        The safest form of cinnamon out there seems to be "cinnulin PF" in which only the water soluble components are extracted and used. This seems to be the safest root if someone was to consume larger doses.

                        exerpt:

                        Chromium and polyphenols from cinnamon improve insulin sensitivity.
                        Proc Nutr Soc. 2008 Feb;67(1):48-53. Anderson RA. Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA.
                        Naturally-occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include Chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon (Cinnamomon cassia). These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signalling and glucose control. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study it has been demonstrated that glucose, insulin, cholesterol and HbA1c are all improved in patients with type 2 diabetes following Chromium supplementation. It has also been shown that cinnamon polyphenols improve insulin sensitivity in in vitro, animal and human studies. Cinnamon reduces mean fasting serum glucose (18-29%), TAG (23-30%), total cholesterol (12-26%) and LDL-cholesterol (7-27%) in subjects with type 2 diabetes after 40 d of daily consumption of 1-6 g cinnamon. Subjects with the metabolic syndrome who consume an aqueous extract of cinnamon have been shown to have improved fasting blood glucose, systolic blood pressure, percentage body fat and increased lean body mass compared with the placebo group. Studies utilizing an aqueous extract of cinnamon, high in type A polyphenols, have also demonstrated improvements in fasting glucose, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in women with insulin resistance associated with the polycystic ovary syndrome. For both supplemental Cr and cinnamon not all studies have reported beneficial effects and the responses are related to the duration of the study, form of Cr or cinnamon used and the extent of obesity and glucose intolerance of the subjects.

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                        • #13
                          Here are a few supplements that help to lower blood glucose levels. I'm also including links to the specific brands that I use, in case you want recommendations:

                          WellBetX Glucose Balance herbal formula (2 tabs, 2x/day; label doesn't specify whether to take with or w/o food; I take them with food)
                          Natural Factors: http://www.iherb.com/Natural-Factors...lets/4938?at=0

                          Alpha lipoid acid, 600 mg (1 cap, 2x/day with meals)
                          Now Foods: http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Alpha...caps/7270?at=0

                          Apple cider vinegar capsules (1-2 caps, up to 3x/day with meals)
                          Now Foods: http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Apple...sules/358?at=0

                          Cinnamon bark (ceylon form) (600 mg, 2 caps, 2x/day with meals)
                          Now Foods: http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Cinna...ules/7268?at=0

                          Curcumin C3 Complex (1 tablet, 2x/day with or w/o food)
                          Doctor's Best: http://www.iherb.com/Doctor-s-Best-B...ets/12137?at=0


                          Check out the user reviews for each product to get a feel for how other people have benefited from these supplements.
                          Last edited by healthseekerKate; 02-24-2011, 03:26 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Thank you healthseekerkate! I actually ended up getting the ceylon cinnamon from iherb and ALA plus another ALA/Cartinine supp. I should've picked up the ACV capsules too...found out about that from a friend earlier today. I appreciate you telling me how much and when too! I was kinda unsure about that lol. I don't want to overdose.

                            Sandokan, here is the summary from webmd on cinnamon that talks about the different kinds and their benefits/harm:

                            http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supple...SIA%20CINNAMON

                            I think I'm going to have to research it a bit more, but thank you for the study.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sandokan2112 View Post
                              Most of the studies, including the original studies showing the benefits of cinnamon on blood sugar were done using "cinnamon cassia"
                              Both types of cinnamon have shown beneficial effects.

                              From the studies i have read, it only takes a bit of cinnamon with your meal to have a positive effect. And no published study showing liver problems from consuming cinnamon in moderation. One study done on rodents actually showed that it protected the liver.

                              The safest form of cinnamon out there seems to be "cinnulin PF" in which only the water soluble components are extracted and used. This seems to be the safest root if someone was to consume larger doses.

                              exerpt:

                              Chromium and polyphenols from cinnamon improve insulin sensitivity.
                              Proc Nutr Soc. 2008 Feb;67(1):48-53. Anderson RA. Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, USDA, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA.
                              Naturally-occurring compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include Chromium and polyphenols found in cinnamon (Cinnamomon cassia). These compounds also have similar effects on insulin signalling and glucose control. In a double-blind placebo-controlled study it has been demonstrated that glucose, insulin, cholesterol and HbA1c are all improved in patients with type 2 diabetes following Chromium supplementation. It has also been shown that cinnamon polyphenols improve insulin sensitivity in in vitro, animal and human studies. Cinnamon reduces mean fasting serum glucose (18-29%), TAG (23-30%), total cholesterol (12-26%) and LDL-cholesterol (7-27%) in subjects with type 2 diabetes after 40 d of daily consumption of 1-6 g cinnamon. Subjects with the metabolic syndrome who consume an aqueous extract of cinnamon have been shown to have improved fasting blood glucose, systolic blood pressure, percentage body fat and increased lean body mass compared with the placebo group. Studies utilizing an aqueous extract of cinnamon, high in type A polyphenols, have also demonstrated improvements in fasting glucose, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in women with insulin resistance associated with the polycystic ovary syndrome. For both supplemental Cr and cinnamon not all studies have reported beneficial effects and the responses are related to the duration of the study, form of Cr or cinnamon used and the extent of obesity and glucose intolerance of the subjects.


                              The information is very interesting. It is new knowledge for me.

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