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  • Next step.

    I am moving to the next cooking step, and am looking at making bone broth for stocks for soups and stew. I have a slow cooker. What do i buy? I saw organic chicken carcasses for just pennies the other day, also cheap are things labeled 'pork bones' 'lamb bones' 'beef neck bone' 'venison necks' etc. I have always thought these were dog food, although they are with the human food part of the layout. Is this what I need?

    Then I put them in the crock pot on low overnight with some water? Is that right?

    How long does the broth keep in the fridge? In the freezer?

    Thanks for the help folks.

    Kit.
    My journal

    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread29984.html

  • #2
    I normally buy beek knuckle or use a chicken carcass and boil it in a pot over the stove. I use garlic, onions, sea salt, pepper and vinegar. I normally boil it for 4-5 hours. I have also made broth overnight in a slow cooker, it just takes a little longer but both yield great results. The most important ingredient in my opinion would be the vinegar since it really pulls the nutrients out of the marrow and into the broth.

    Oh and normally I only refrigerate for a week at the most but others may do it for longer.
    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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    • #3
      My slow cooker is my life blood now!

      I actually buy grass-fed beef shank, which is a horizontal sectioning of the leg containing the bone. It's a nice tough cut for the slow cooker. I cut the meat into chunks and throw the bone into the pot too. Then I just use water and spices as my base for the stew.

      It's nice because it leeches the good stuff out of the bone at the same time as making my stew. I know that nutrients have come out of the bone because my stew turns gelatinous when placed in the fridge.

      If you want to make a stock, any bones are great, but beef bones are awesome. One thing to consider is that the larger the bone, the longer you should cook it. I only do chicken bones for 4 hrs on the stove top, but the beef bones I cook overnight for 10 hrs.

      As for storage, I never keep stocks/stews in the fridge for more than a week, but that's only because I am consuming them, not because they are getting thrown out. I don't know about storage time in the freezer.


      Originally posted by Balance View Post
      The most important ingredient in my opinion would be the vinegar since it really pulls the nutrients out of the marrow and into the broth.
      +1
      If you google stock recipes there is always something to add acidity and really get the most out of the bones.

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      • #4
        I started making stock a few months ago.

        Throw your bones into the slow cooker with some roughly chopped onion, carrot & celery, maybe a bay leaf, some pepper, maybe a few other herbs if you depending on the flavor you want. Fill with water. Add some vinegar to help extract the mineral goodness from the bones. I leave it overnight, and then still through the next day, so around 24 hours, if possible, some leave it for even longer. Cool a bit, strain the broth, I pour it through a collander to collect all the big bits then through a sieve (or you could use cheesecloth for a finer strain). I usually put it in the fridge until cold, then scoop off the fat layer before storing. Should be good for days in the fridge, I pour into ziplok bags of 2 cups each and freeze, and it is good for a few months. You could freeze some in ice cube trays then into a ziplok to have small portions handy for sauces.

        If you're using beef/pork/lamb bones, you can roast them in a hot oven for a while first, it seems to concentrate the flavours.

        Don't add any salt, you can add this to whatever recipe you are using the stock in later.

        All those weird looking bones you see at the store would work well for stock. If cutting up whole chickens, I save the necks and backs in the freezer (just keep adding bones until I have a full bag) to make into chicken stock later on.

        I'm by no means an expert at this, but so far I've been very pleased with the results. There are some links on the MDA blog for tips on stock making, I don't have them handy, but take a look for more info. And good luck. It's so worth it.
        My musings

        The old stuff

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        • #5
          I also stockpile bones from cooked meats in my freezer and when I have a healthy amount, I make stock.

          Also, if you are going to store it in the freezer, reduce your stock down by half (by boiling/simmering it). It takes up less room in your freezer. When you go to use it, you just add some water.

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          • #6
            Leftover chicken carcass or picked over bones from beef ribs make wonderful stock. I've found that, along with the usual broth suspects (onion, sea salt, celery, bay), adding whole peppercorns, allspice berries, and a couple peels from a tangerine or an orange really brings out an underlying richness. Trust me, I know it sounds weird, but it is AMAZING!
            Heck no, I don't want no dang turkey bacon!

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            • #7
              Gosh that does sound weird but I'm getting into weird nowadays!

              Thanks for all the answers folks, bone broth here we come!
              My journal

              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread29984.html

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              • #8
                wow, thanks to the OP for asking this, and thanks for all the replies. I was really curious about this myself. I either have to get myself a stock pot or a slow cooker. These sound really delicious. One thing I really like about primal is that we can use all of the animal; organs, bones, meat, and fat. ^^
                Height: 5'2"
                Starting weight: 180lbs
                Current weight 130lbs

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                • #9
                  Mmmm, broth

                  Tip: with beef especially, check that the bones you're buying will actually fit into your slow cooker. (No, it is not sensible to try to break beef bones at home. Yes, there is a reason why Grok made tools out of them.)

                  If you don't like the taste of vinegar in the finished product, you can use the juice of a couple of lemons instead.

                  I use onion, carrot and celery, roasted along with the bones for beef, lamb or venison, and add thyme, maybe peppercorns and a piece of kombu, plus maybe a sundried tomato or 2 for beef, to the pot with the water. Then it gets at least 12 hours in the slow cooker - more for bigger bones.

                  Orange peel? Thanks for the tip.

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                  • #10
                    If you roast the bones first until browned the broth will be even more awesome!

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                    • #11
                      Adrianag is right about meat bones roasted first make better soups. One help for making stock with bird carcasses is use a pasta cooker that you allows you to lift all the solids out easily.
                      This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it. Ralph Waldo Emerson

                      Any given day you are surrounded by 10,000 idiots.
                      Lao Tsu, founder of Taoism

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Adrianag View Post
                        If you roast the bones first until browned the broth will be even more awesome!
                        So, my apologies if this is a dumb question...if I'm using a carcass or beef bones that I've already cooked and we've picked clean, technically they've already been roasted. Right? *sheepish*
                        Heck no, I don't want no dang turkey bacon!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Hilary View Post
                          Mmmm, broth

                          Orange peel? Thanks for the tip.
                          You're welcome. I highly recommend the orange peel and allspice berries together.The last batch of chicken broth that I made just didn't quite taste as good, and then I realized I had forgotten the allspice. I added a couple to the broth and put it in the fridge, and the next day it tasted like it should. The combination creates a very rich undertone to both poultry and beef.
                          Heck no, I don't want no dang turkey bacon!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Pink Slinky View Post
                            So, my apologies if this is a dumb question...if I'm using a carcass or beef bones that I've already cooked and we've picked clean, technically they've already been roasted. Right? *sheepish*
                            Yes, I was going to ask the same thing.....
                            My journal

                            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread29984.html

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mldami View Post
                              I also stockpile bones from cooked meats in my freezer and when I have a healthy amount, I make stock.

                              Also, if you are going to store it in the freezer, reduce your stock down by half (by boiling/simmering it). It takes up less room in your freezer. When you go to use it, you just add some water.
                              I not only save every bone in my freezer, I save all my veggie trimmings (peels, ends, tops, stems, stalks, leaves, you name it - if it would normally go in your trash or compost, put it in a freezer bag). I made a hodgepodge stock the other day with a full 1-gal freezer bag of veggie trimmings and a 1-lb bag of various bones (a lot of chicken wing bones as it was right after the Super Bowl, plus a lamb shank bone and a pork chop bone). I was blown away by how much extra flavor the veggies added.

                              Also, for those of you who have a "multi-pot" that has both a steamer basket insert and a "pasta" basket insert, making your stock with the pasta insert makes straining out the bones/veggies so much easier (unfortunately I remembered I had this after I'd started the stock which meant an extra pan got dirty).
                              Last edited by ennasirk; 02-20-2011, 11:51 AM.
                              "Sometimes, you need to make sure the angel on your shoulder has a wingman." -Me

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