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Tamari: is it really primal?

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  • Tamari: is it really primal?

    I've been perusing the cookbook and noticed that there are quite a few recipes involving tamari. I see from the Blueprint book that fermented soy is better than other versions of soy (which should not be eaten) but is it truly primal? Would (Japanese?) Grok have eaten it? Is it bad in any way?

    Thoughts welcome please as I'm going primal soon and am shopping in preparation

  • #2
    Soya sauce has both wheat and fermented soya. Tamari has the fermented soya but no wheat. So it is better and fermented legumes are better than unfermented legumes
    Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

    Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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    • #3
      I don't think Grok would have eaten it simply because he wouldn't have had access to it. However, if it's properly fermented and wheat-free--prepared as traditional cultures would, WAPF style--I think it's fine occasionally.

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      • #4
        Be sure to check the label... I think some tamari still has wheat in it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by peril View Post
          Soya sauce has both wheat and fermented soya. Tamari has the fermented soya but no wheat. So it is better and fermented legumes are better than unfermented legumes
          Tamari is a class of Japanese soy sauce (they have different classes) which may or may not have wheat. From the Just Hungry blog (Japanese food blog):

          "Tamari soy sauce. This is a pet peeve of mine, but I find it rather annoying when tamari is touted as a more 'real' soy sauce than regular soy sauce in some circles. Tamari literally means the dregs; it's the dark, somewhat viscous soy sauce at the bottom of the barrell. Tamari is traditionally only used as a dipping sauce.(Conversely, in Kyoto, which has arguably the most refined cuisine in all of Japan, they regard the regular dark soy sauce that is used in the rest of the country as an inferior product that contaminates the color and flavor of foods too much, and prefer a light colored soy sauce.)"

          As others have said, fermentation takes care of the majority of anti-nutrients you'd worry about. Plus, the amount used is typically minimal, so it's not something that I would worry about.

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          • #6
            I have seen some tamari with wheat.

            If you want gluten free make sure you get a naturally brewed tamari and read the ingredients list. Eden organic has one.
            Last edited by O_O; 02-19-2011, 08:32 AM.

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            • #7
              Please use coconut aminos. THEY ROCK!
              Little Saiyan

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ikaika View Post
                Please use coconut aminos. THEY ROCK!
                I second that!

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                • #9
                  For me, this falls under the category: Primal eating isn't about food re-enactment.
                  Heather and the hounds - Make a Fast Friend, Adopt a Greyhound!

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                  • #10
                    It's not really primal, but I can't see the harm in using it occasionally. I made roast pork yesterday and had it with some tamari and powdered ginger, nice!

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                    • #11
                      Ok thanks guys, I've bought some what free tamari and will use sparingly!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ikaika View Post
                        Please use coconut aminos. THEY ROCK!
                        I realise this a very delayed response, but I'd like to thank you for your suggestion - I tried them and like them very much.

                        My favourite use of them is to mash up some ginger and garlic in a pestle and mortar, add some coconut aminos and then smear over chicken (especially chicken wings) and roast. I think it tastes similar to but better than soy sauce.

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