Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Oatmeal

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oatmeal

    Hello,

    I have been trying to eat mostly Primal over the last 4 weeks. Other than catching a cold in the middle, I find I am feeling good, am less hungry and maintain a regular amount of energy. I feel less bloated, and leaner. The main thing that I have not stayed away from is Peanut Butter - organic with no additives. But, I've substituted pure almond butter about half the time. I found the Primal Blueprint to be quite enlightening and have shared the concepts with several people. I was most fired up to learn that I could stop throwing those yolks away!

    The one meal I miss the most is oatmeal. For several years, one of my standard breakfast meals was real Old Fashioned Oats, with flaxseed, protein powder, and berries (blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, or pomegranates). I always viewed this as a healthy breakfast.

    How non-primal is oatmeal, as it relates to the no-grains concept. Should I stay away from it completely, or revert to the 80/20 rule? It'd be nice to have it once or twice a week .

    I am also working out with relative high intensity, following a P90X/Insanity Hybrid, so I've been a little concerned about getting enough carbs at the appropriate time. Wondering if my Oatmeal combo could be a post-workout meal?

    Thanks for any thoughts on this.

    Heath

  • #2
    Even if they weren't most often times contaminated with gluten (which they are) oats are very very non-primal.
    "You can demonstrate the purpose and limits of human digestion with a simple experiment: eat a steak with some whole corn kernels, and see what comes out the other end. It won’t be the steak."
    -J.Stanton

    Comment


    • #3
      depends. The occasional bowl I guess, but not optimal. Post workout might be the least harmful time to have them.

      I make a porridge (=oatmeal made with less fine oats) with a little bit of rice cereal (about a tablespoon or so), half a banana and some dessicated coconut with milk and cream, and a handful of pecans and blueberries. The cooked banana gives sweetness and the oatmeal-ish texture.
      If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat? Tom Snyder

      Comment


      • #4
        http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/20...od-or-bad.html

        Comment


        • #5
          I used to adore oatmeal...turns out it was the cause of ten years of bowel trouble for me, so I never, ever cheat. This recipe is a nice substitute for me. You can eat it warm or cold - much to my surprise I prefer it cold. I make a big batch and it lasts a week or so in the fridge.

          1. Meat and liquid from 2 fresh, young coconuts
          2. 2-3 handfuls of soaked almonds
          3. 2 apples, cut into pieces
          4. 5 figs
          5. cinnamon and/or nutmeg to taste

          Blend together until the consistency of oatmeal. It keeps in the fridge for at least a week.

          I might try it with half macadamia nuts, half almonds. Or add a little coconut milk to it. If warm, butter would be good in it.

          I prefer this to oatmeal now.

          Edited: Should be 2-3 handfuls of almonds...not cups!!
          Last edited by jammies; 02-01-2011, 07:43 PM.
          Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

          http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

          Comment


          • #6
            SlimIcy is RIGHT ON. The above thread is VERY IMPORTANT. Eating Oatmeal is far worse than a bowl of sugar.

            Grizz

            Comment


            • #7
              where are the sources for that heartscan data?
              If we’re not supposed to eat animals, how come they’re made out of meat? Tom Snyder

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by geekgrrl View Post
                where are the sources for that heartscan data?
                Geekgrrl,
                Source is here: Cardiologist Dr. Wm Davis Blog:
                http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

                He is my BIBLE for nutrition & supplements. He was directly responsible for our acceptance of the Paleo Diet and he even promotes "The Paleo Solution" book by Rob Wolf.

                I have a great many of his references in my links below,
                Grizz

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just my 2 cents but the 80/20 rule doesn't mean purposely eating non-Primal foods 20% of the time. It's more about aiming for 100% and if slips happen, don't kick yourself over it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Diana Renata View Post
                    Just my 2 cents but the 80/20 rule doesn't mean purposely eating non-Primal foods 20% of the time. It's more about aiming for 100% and if slips happen, don't kick yourself over it.
                    I thought it was more like, 80% wholly-primal foods (meat, eggs, fibrous veggies) and 20% semi-primal foods (fruit, sweet potatoes, nuts, full-fat dairy)? As opposed to the 20% being stuff like grains, sugar, shortening, etc.
                    My food blog ~ http://stuffimakemyhusband.blogspot.com
                    My primal success story

                    "Boxing seems to contain so complete and so powerful an image of life -- life's beauty, vulnerability, despair, incalculable and often self-destructive courage -- that boxing IS life, and hardly a mere game." --Joyce Carol Oates

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Possible alternative, more cereal-ish: http://girlgoneprimal.blogspot.com/2...ola-final.html
                      Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

                      If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

                      Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Oatmeal has gluten in it, which is a pretty darn harmful protein as we all know. I've heard somewhere that gluten stays in your system for about three weeks, though I cannot name the source. Simply put, it is not worth it.

                        Like several people have mentioned, the point of the PB is to eat and move primally 100 percent of the time, and not deliberately sabotage your lifestyle because you "cannot get over a non-primal food." I'm not a big fan of substitutes. Using faux oatmeal to "cure" cravings is not going to help. It is like the methadone to heroin. We all had to give up some of our favorite "foods" in order to be able to live primally, but then we found that after a few weeks, those "foods" do not even look like foods. I used to be a big candy fiend, but now, if I look at candy, I see it as junk, not something to consume. Same with oatmeal.

                        Want a good breakfast? Either IF or have some eggs with something like primal sausage or some meat. Omelets are great too. Use your imagination to make a great primal breakfast to take your mind of the old ways of living; it will be worth it in the end.
                        --
                        Here it is, your moment of zen.

                        It's a no brainer: The journal of the cerebelum

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by erica057 View Post
                          I thought it was more like, 80% wholly-primal foods (meat, eggs, fibrous veggies) and 20% semi-primal foods (fruit, sweet potatoes, nuts, full-fat dairy)? As opposed to the 20% being stuff like grains, sugar, shortening, etc.
                          From what I gather from other people here who have been doing this longer is that it's not really 20% for everyone. It depends on your goals and your body. You will find plenty of people here that are trying to lose weight and absolutely cannot do it if they eat any of the semi-primals. Some folks can. You'll find athletes who need extra carbs and will eat sweet potatoes every day. I think it's about listening to your body more than following a formula.

                          Edit: I forgot to respond to the OP. Personally, I'd be looking for something primal that hit the same spot. (Looks like you've already gotten some good suggestions.) But then I'm approaching this as a person with an auto-immune disease. I'm trying to eliminate grains to solve other health issues. If my body is, in fact, attacking itself do to grain intolerance then eating it even twice a week is massively self-defeating. Maybe it wouldn't be an issue for you. Maybe a long soak/ferment would be enough to get the antinutrients out and you'd be fine. I can't say. Some people tolerate grains better than others. I'd try going a month or two without and see if it's all that important to you.
                          Last edited by DaisyEater; 02-01-2011, 12:20 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            On those days where I want a bowl of something warm and comforting, and NOT bacon and eggs-ish, I make pumpkin custards.

                            1/2 cup pure pumpkin puree
                            1 teaspoon ground ginger
                            1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
                            1/3 teaspoon nutmeg
                            1/2 TBSP ground cinnamon
                            1 TBSP maple syrup
                            1 cup heavy cream
                            1 large egg plus 2 egg yolks

                            Bring 1 quarter water to boil for a water bath. Set eight 6-ounce custard cups in two 8-inch square pans. Adjust the oven rack to the lower-middle position and preheat to 325 degrees. (I've done this all in one pie dish too, and it works.)

                            Heat pumpkin, ginger, and cinnamon in a medium saucepan over medium heat until puree sputters and flavors intensify, about 3 minutes. Whisk in cream and maple syrup. Bring to a simmer.

                            Meanwhile, whisk egg and yolks in a medium bowl. Gradually whisk hot-pumpkin mixture into the eggs, then pour into custard cups. Set pans in oven and carefully pour enough water in the pan to come halfway up the sides of the cups.

                            Bake until the custards are set, about 30 minutes. Remove custard cups from the baking dish and cool slightly. Lay plastic wrap directly over each custard to prevent a skin from forming. Chill until ready to serve. (I serve this hot for breakfast, with vanilla whipped cream and toasted pecans. Mmmmm!)
                            The more I see the less I know for sure.
                            -John Lennon

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Henderpuck View Post
                              Hello,
                              The one meal I miss the most is oatmeal. For several years, one of my standard breakfast meals was real Old Fashioned Oats, with flaxseed, protein powder, and berries (blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, or pomegranates). I always viewed this as a healthy breakfast.
                              Heath
                              This was me when I first started primal. Took me about two months to give up oatmeal. My gateway b'fast was a coconut bowl (from someone here, can't remember who). I microwaved a sliced banana and berries in coconut milk and then topped with sliced toasted almonds. Kept me full for several hours, and helped me move away from sweet breakfasts. I've since moved onto the typical eggs/bacon/veg, but supplement with 1/2 sweet potato, because I do like something sweet, and I work out enough to justify/allow.

                              I had oatmeal the other day, and sadly, I no longer enjoy it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X