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Our Kindergartener is allergic to eggs and ALL nuts...

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  • Our Kindergartener is allergic to eggs and ALL nuts...

    Yes, he's allergic to eggs and all nuts. So getting his protein throughout the day is a challenge.

    Any suggestions for protein for breakfasts, school lunches and snacks?

    He enjoys bacon and sausage, but we'd like to have alternatives for him to eat throughout the day before his homemade primal dinners. And he'd eat fruit 24/7 if we'd let him.

    Thanks in advance for any and all help!

  • #2
    Cheese is good for protein. Chicken breast cut into strips might be good for school, easy and not super messy. Same could go for pork chops cut into strips.

    Do yourself a favor and become your own savior.
    Congenital Hypothyroid
    CW: 225lbs SW: 245lbs

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    • #3
      Protein shakes with dairy and whey protein powder for added protein.

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      • #4
        Is he allergic to dairy? You can always try greek yogurt (maybe too tangy?) or full fat plain yogurt...brown cow brand is AMAZING. Tuna fish salad is good or any fish!

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        • #5
          I nanny three kids from 2 - 8, and this was a challenge at first (kids love their grains!), but they soon adjust - and will be gobbling up their veggies and meat!

          The thing is, you've got to stop thinking of breakfast as typical breakfast foods. Leftovers are a win for us, we make large quantities of soup, and they're yummy for breakfast (we often make carrot cake mousse to accompany this, google carrot cake mousse GAPS for a great kid-friendly recipe!)
          Chicken fingers (pan fried or baked), hamburgers (we make "squash" burgers, slow cooked @ 225 for a while, just pop them in and set a timer). Of course those are a little more time consuming. The go to for quick meals is "scramble", ground beef/turkey/lamb, through it in with spices & veggies & lots of coconut oil/butter, and you've got a meal in about 10 minutes.

          Seeds also work as an accompaniment, but make sure he doesn't consume too much, they are really hard to digest and I notice behavior problems right away when they have been at the table with the seeds a bit too long..

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          • #6
            could he handle taking a thermos full of soup to school? Soup and chili and stews can be totally primal and I personally would rather eat them than a large hunk of meat.

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            • #7
              Does he enjoy avocdao? It's chock full of good stuffs.
              "What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence."

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              • #8
                Michelle,

                Instead of asking what he can eat, ask why does he have allergies. Allergies relate to the Immune System gone haywire.
                Read this:
                http://www.naturalnews.com/z028357_v...eficiency.html

                Allergies are a form of Autoimmune Disease, and at the root of MOST autoimmune Disease is severe Vitamin D3 deficiency. Children should be given 1,000 IU Vitamin D3 per 25 lbs body weight daily. Then after 3 months get his blood tested to be sure it is optimal at 60 to 70 ng/ml.

                My own allergies were Asthma which I suffered for many years. It is now GONE since I started taking 10,000 IU Daily of Vitamin D3. I am boosting my dosage to 12,000 IU Daily because my blood test came in low, at 45 ng/ml.
                Also NO CHEST COLDS so far this winter. YAY ! For decades I had suffered a VERY nasty chest cold every winter that lasted for many weeks.

                More tips on Vitamin D3 below,
                Grizz
                Last edited by Grizz; 01-30-2011, 02:58 PM.

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                • #9
                  My eldest kid is the pickiest kid ever. Well, I exaggerate.

                  Lately she's on a chorizo kick (I buy the really good stuff). So she gets 5/6 slices of that, along with some carrots and hummus and apple chips with raisins. She won't eat dairy of any kind, unless its ice cream. Cheese and yogurt is out. She'll also eat celery and cream cheese (but don't offer her cream cheese with anything else!!!!) Weirdo. There is a no-nut policy at her school, so that is saved for an afterschool snack.

                  Luckily she doesn't get tired of it.

                  She will take shredded pork shoulder when I've got it on hand, she calls it candy meat.

                  My youngest, she loves "le melange", which is just a plate of picky foods, (she eats eggs, so usually eggs are included), meats, cheeses, nuts, dehydrated apples, raisins, dates, (she only gets a small amt of dried fruit).
                  SW: 235
                  CW:220
                  Rough start due to major carb WD.

                  MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
                  Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
                  Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
                  Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

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                  • #10
                    There is no reason that packed lunches have to be convenience foods. Leftover whatever kind of meat.

                    chicken , pork, beef, leftover and diced to make lettuce wraps. With veggie strips.

                    Chunks of meat with a dipping sauce - kids love to dip.
                    MTA: because it is rare I dont have more to say

                    "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - my daughter Age 7

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                    • #11
                      My grokling is only 9 months, so maybe it's a common thing to have a "no nut policy" at school? I've never heard of that before!
                      "What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence."

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                      • #12
                        Yes, it's from the prevalence of peanut allergies and the chance a kid might "trade" inadvertently...or because of extreme allergies to airborne peanut particles.

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                        • #13
                          As someone who has battled allergies, asthma, and eczema in my daughter and myself, I would HIGHLY recommend you look into GAPS. It will totally seem like overkill but it is SOOOOO much easier to heal children's leaky guts the younger they are. DD's asthma is 100% gone. The eczema and food allergies are 99% gone. My food allergies are a lot better but I've still got work to do.

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                          • #14
                            My kids school is "no nut" but I think that there are some schools that still allow it. She would ADORE PB filled celery or as a dip for carrots. She loves PB and almond butter.

                            Hell, I have a hard enough time with dehydrated apples as her teacher is allergic. I can send dehydrated ones, but not fresh ones.
                            SW: 235
                            CW:220
                            Rough start due to major carb WD.

                            MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
                            Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
                            Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
                            Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ohhh...that makes sense I guess...so no PB&J sandwiches at school?
                              "What can be asserted without evidence can be dismissed without evidence."

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