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  • Buying meat

    Okay, so before primal I didn't eat a lot of meat and now when I go to the store and look at all of the different cuts I don't know what to buy ...particulary beef. I don't want to get sick of ground beef and eggs. What kinds of meats do you like to buy (type and cut)??

  • #2
    If clean, I can't get enough of a good rib-eye or T-bone steak. Arm and shoulder cuts are good to pot roast, ribs are delicious braised. Grain-fed cuts are best lean as that minimizes omega-6 fats and fat-soluble toxins. Flank steak is delicious on the grill, tri-tip roasts are quite yummy as well.

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    • #3
      http://www.txbeef.org/cooking_school/shop_smart

      Scroll to bottom to click on different cuts.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by AndreaReina View Post
        If clean, I can't get enough of a good rib-eye or T-bone steak. Arm and shoulder cuts are good to pot roast, ribs are delicious braised. Grain-fed cuts are best lean as that minimizes omega-6 fats and fat-soluble toxins. Flank steak is delicious on the grill, tri-tip roasts are quite yummy as well.
        Do all of the meats we eat have to be grass-fed or organic, because I am having hard time finding them and that makes me confused as to what to buy also!

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        • #5
          Buy one of everything.
          carl's cave

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          • #6
            Grass fed / organic is better, but not essential. Even "bog standard" meat is better for you than bread Lamb is normally raised on pasture anyway, as it's not worth feeding them precious grains

            If you picture a cow, think of what the muscles are doing. The shins are hard working, they keep the animal on its feet all day. This means they can be tough, will have lots of connective tissue - so AMAZING in stews when all that tissue breaks down. Contrast with something like the loin, that doesn't work so hard, so is tender if you just quickly cook it.

            Beware differences in cuts, nationally / locally! I've been confused by recipes calling for things that don't exist over here!
            Overall, just try something. Ask your butcher, google it, or just bung it in the oven and see what happens

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            • #7
              Take the conventional wisdom that says to buy the leanest cuts of meat and do the opposite. Also buy only grass-fed, as stated.

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              • #8
                Organic/grass-fed is optimal, but not a requirement. Most of the stuff we want to avoid is in the fat, so if buying conventional (and many have to because of the cost) go for the leaner cuts -- arm/shoulder, sirloin, round, etc.

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                • #9
                  Something I do to "cheat" - buy conventional, lean meat if and when necessary. To get the grass-fed fat, I buy breast of lamb, and cook in such a way that I can save the fat and use that for cooking. Lamb breast is a very cheap cut *because* it is so fatty, but as I mentioned above, I believe all UK lamb is grass fed so has the good stuff in the fat.

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                  • #10
                    Once per week, go into the grocery store and buy something new. Just whatever tickles your fancy. Then, go home, research it and the best way to cook it. Have some canned tuna in the pantry as back up in case its gross.

                    We go on binges, one week we will eat nothing but ham steaks, bacon, ham hocks, pork ribs and pork loin. Then, we go on a beef kick etc.

                    Oh, and I ADORE roasting a whole chicken, with loads of butter and spices, letting the skin get all crackly and brown (I baste lots). I make sure to roast some root veggies in the butter in the pan. We had this tonight. My husband and I fought over the celeriac. My girls didn't want any (HA!), they had cauliflower and roasted broccoli instead.
                    SW: 235
                    CW:220
                    Rough start due to major carb WD.

                    MWF: 1 hour run/walk, 1.5 hours in the gym - upper/lower and core
                    Sat/Sun=Yard/house work, chasing kids, playing
                    Family walk every night instead of everyone vegging in front of the TV
                    Personal trainer to build muscle mass & to help meet goals

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                    • #11
                      Look for cuts that have nice marbling
                      --Trish (Bork)
                      TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
                      http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
                      FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
                        Look for cuts that have nice marbling
                        Sorry, but I disagree with this. Most "nice marbling" is achieved by grain-finishing livestock, which kind of ruins the fat ratios. Also, the fat of conventional meat will store a lot of the crap that the cattle are exposed to during their brutal, toxic lives. If you're buying conventional meat, go for lean cuts. If you're buying good-quality, grass-finished meat, go for the fattiest cuts. These are usually cheaper, things like chuck roast and short ribs.

                        When I go to the farm, I tend to buy the cheapest cuts of meat. Last time, I got 2 5-lb. rump roasts (good for braising), 4lbs. of chip steak (thin slices, like for cheesesteaks), 10 lbs. of ground beef, and a heart. I already have 4 lbs. of pork liver in the freezer so I didn't get liver, but I'd usually get 2-5 lbs. of liver, too. This will last us about 2 months, but we don't eat a whole lot of meat (we stretch it with eggs, broth, bacon, and good quality fats like coconut milk and ghee).

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Melantha View Post
                          Sorry, but I disagree with this. Most "nice marbling" is achieved by grain-finishing livestock, which kind of ruins the fat ratios. Also, the fat of conventional meat will store a lot of the crap that the cattle are exposed to during their brutal, toxic lives. If you're buying conventional meat, go for lean cuts. If you're buying good-quality, grass-finished meat, go for the fattiest cuts. These are usually cheaper, things like chuck roast and short ribs.
                          I agree. If one is relying on only conventional grown meat in regular supermarkets, lean cuts is the way to go. On the other hand, grainfed beef/lamb/bison have low omega 6, so it is generally accepted as fine to have the "fatty" parts as long as the meat is antibiotic/hormone free. The omega 6:3 imbalance can easily be fixed with fish oil supplementation or fresh/canned seafood.

                          On the subject of "nice marbling", last week I purchased 100% grass finished bone-in rib steak, and it was absolutely divine. Nothing compares to 100% grassfed beef! It is food of the gods!
                          Last edited by Zed; 01-25-2011, 07:10 PM.

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                          • #14
                            My recent favorite is a good flat-iron steak. Sometimes I'll cut it into thin strips for the grill. It's pretty good.
                            Another cut is a hanger steak, although it has a bit of 'kidney' taste to it, due to the location of cut.
                            Flank steak is another cut but as with the others above, cook them no more than medium rare.

                            I also look for good marbling. http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2011/0...ide-to_21.html

                            These data make it very clear that the best way to reduce your intake of excessive omega-6 oils lies in restricting intake of chicken and eliminating most tree nuts and vegetable oils from your diet. If you do this, you can easily attain a healthy total diet ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 even if you eat only grain-finished beef, lamb, pork, and bison, by including some fatty fish like salmon, sardines, or sea bass in your diet.
                            Retirement has afforded me the ultimate affluence, that of free time (Sahlins/Wells)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dr. Bork Bork View Post
                              Look for cuts that have nice marbling

                              I agree to an extent. The fat tastes freaking good even in conventional meat. Is is loaded with all the bad stuff etc sure, but my taste buds don't know that. Also since I eat rib eye (a very marbled steak) about twice a year I think it is worth it for the taste factor. That said, a nice sirloin is damned good too and usually cheaper than other steaks so it is a nice way to get some decent meat and fit the leaner idea with conventional meats.

                              Grass fed can be hard to find. The only place I can get it here, without driving an hour, is the farmer's market which is held 4 hours a week, on Thursdays, right in the middle of my work day. I could buy half a grass fed cow but that would also require buying a freezer and moving to an apartment large enough for a freezer. As such, 95% of the meat I eat or more is grain fed. You have to make do with what you can get.

                              So my suggestions:

                              Steak: sirloin - grill it up, skirt - fajitas! (without the tortilla)
                              Roast: sirloin tip - cook it nice and slow
                              Easy: chuck/arm/shoulder - toss that baby in the crock pot
                              Soups: oxtail - OMG this is freaking awesome

                              Lamb - my favorite but expensive so a rare treat

                              Chicken - roasted whole sitting on top of root veggies is fantastic

                              Pork - bacon (nuff said), loin - I really like it on the grill, thick chops - grill again. All pork is great with some sauteed apples
                              Last edited by canio6; 01-25-2011, 08:53 PM. Reason: I can't spell apparently

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