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A dog's life.

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  • A dog's life.

    My wife and I have "moved in with Grok" for 16 weeks now and are really enjoying pretty much everything about it. a couple of weeks into primal eating/living, i decided to change both of my dogs diet to raw meat.

    Let me tell you their experiences so far...one dog, Thor (male) is mix of Chow-Chow and german shepard and the other Mia (female) is mixed Labrador with Sharpei. They are both around 10 years old, i brought the male home when he was just 2 weeks old and the female we rescued from a shelter, she was extremely mistreated and abused.

    I alway fed them commercial food and not the most expensive stuff either, Thor has always been a healthy happy dog but a few years ago we found some lumps on his body, some blister looking things the size of an egg and filled with clear liquid so we took him to the vet for shot and get it checked.

    The Vet said it was nothing major and he could drain it with a syringe but it would likely fill back up and it did but we just left it alone since it did not seem to be bothering Thor.

    Mia on the other hand, had a bad case of flaky skin ( looked like HEAVY dandruff ) and just a couple of days after washing her she would be stinky, like a dirty dog.

    Well, after switching to raw meat diet we noticed her hair was supper shinny and she would smell good after washes...SWEET! Happy dog = happy owner.

    Then, the other day i was grooming Thor and it just clicked..."Where are the blisters? Holly crap, it's gone!"

    Strike 2, Happy dogs = happy owner!

    My dogs eat mainly chicken leg quarters and once in a while beef or chicken liver.

  • #2
    Very interesting! I wonder if it would work for cats? What do you, and others of course, think?

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    • #3
      I think it would work, cats are supposed to be carnivores, no ? (i think so)

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      • #4
        Cats are obligate carnivores. It galls me that we feed my cat a grain based diet, especially since we've switched to primal. Dogs actually can eat more non meaty things than cats. Google "barf diet cats" or "raw fed cats" or somesuch. You'll find good links.


        Robin's Roost
        My Primal Journal

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        • #5
          Herbwifemama, I was trying to figure out the picture in your avatar...at first i thought it was a Pig's feet (as in pickled pig feet) but after squinting pretty hard i realized it was a cat.

          P.S. It is a cat right? :-)

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          • #6
            kinda looks like a lion cub stretched out on its back to me

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            • #7
              Get them some heart too, it's cheap and the taurine's good for them.

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              • #8
                Will add heart to their diet as well...

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                • #9
                  My dog ate a raw food diet the last year of her life. She had the canine version of MS, and our natural vet suggested it would help lessen her symptoms. I think it really did for awhile, and plus she was one happy dog with that diet! We eventually had to put her to sleep because her life became so miserable with lack of bodily function. But she LOVED her raw food diet, and her coat/skin improved. I was amazed that it was OK to feed her raw chicken bones. The vet said it was fine and good for her. It's cooked chicken bones that are harmful because they're so splintery.

                  We also supplemented her meat with veggies. I would throw a bunch of raw veggies in the food processor and grind up into a paste and give to her maybe a cup or so with the meat. We usually used greens, cabbage, carrots, celery, yams. If I remember right (this was about 10 years ago), the vet said that dogs benefit greatly from many veggies but it's good to grind them up first because they're not able to chew them in the same way that people do. It was to help their digestion. I would grind up several days worth and put in a tub in the fridge and just scoop out a big dollop for her meals with the meat. She loved it!

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                  • #10
                    When I cut the grains out of my own diet and realized feeling fabulous, I had the same thought for my dogs, then 10 & a puppy at the time. I figured if taking the grains out of MY diet made me feel so much better, the dogs would probably really appreciate it, too!

                    My 10-yo had been DXd with arthritis and was taking glucosamine. while she was happy, she just "walked", no extra activity. Now that I'm raw feeding them both, she will jump and run. it is so awesome to see!!! we're off the glucosamine, too.

                    You want to make sure you're giving organ meat, too. Liver, kidney, etc., Heart is considered muscle so not organ. My dogs get 1.5 oz liver/day.

                    As to cats, yes, they should be eating this way, too. From what I understand, tho, it is harder to get them switched over. we were blessed with a freezer full of elk burger (burnt) so i thought it'd be the perfect time to switch the cats over. i've tried enlisting the help of my very helpful 14-yo but she's not digging it, lol! she'll feed the dogs and she'll help (lots!) with dinner but she's not big on switching the cats, lol! I feel bad for them as our "kitten" is fat!!! and i know it's her food!

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                    • #11
                      Be careful. Not all dogs can handle a raw meat diet. We have an 8-year old Lab. He has nothing but problems. Lots of allergies, seasonal as well as food. It comes from being so darn inbred. I've been cooking his meals for the past 2 years. Every 3 weeks. They are portioned into morning and afternoon meals and then frozen. His diet currently consists of sweet potato, carrots, beef and pork. I'll cook pork rib bones in a pressure cooker until they are soft enough that they'll break up somewhat and add it to the food mix. It helps with the calcium. He still chews his feet, but not nearly as bad as he did before. He gets Omega 3 capsules with his meal.

                      We tried the raw meat diet. He had uncontrollable diarrhea from it, so we took him off it.

                      Commercial diets are always grain based, usually corn because it's cheap. After that it's barley or rice, and even oats. Even the most expensive dry dog food should be questioned for purity. I read a number of articles a couple years ago that exposed the addition of euthanized pets into dog and cat food. Apparently the practice has been stopped, but has it really? You have to ask yourself... thousands of pets are euthanized every year. What happens to the carcasses that aren't cremated and returned to the owner? I'm certain they are still shipped off to rendering plants. Once rendered, what happens to the animal meal? It's a disgusting subject, but if you have pets and you feed them commercial dog food, you might want to reconsider.
                      You donít stop riding because youíre getting old, you get old because you stop riding.

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                      • #12
                        HonuRacer - I'm so sorry to hear you felt you needed to take your dog off raw food...

                        When I started following the candida program, I was warned that I could get diarrhea as it's part of the body's way of voiding toxins. So perhaps your dog was just getting rid of toxins.

                        It could also be that he wasn't getting enough bone. I find beef and pork ribs for $1.59# and give each dog a rib a couple of times/wk: raw, that is. Cooked bones don't have the nutrients in them that raw bones have and cooked bones can splinter where raw bones are soft enough for dogs to chew (I've been told not to give dogs weight-bearing bones, tho).

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                        • #13
                          I currently have my cats on Evo which is grain-free and lower carb compared to other pre-made food. They do seem much healthier on it. They self-regulate better and their coats improved. I tried one of the pre-made frozen raw diets before and I've never seen so much puking. I do wonder if it would be better if I made them raw food myself, though. My only worry is that I foster. Most people aren't going to want the hassle, so they'll end up having to transition to a commercial diet when they go to their new homes. I rarely even convince adopters to keep them on the grain-free stuff because of the expense. I send some home with them so they can gradually transition. If I was doing raw, I doubt I could even give them an adjustment period.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DaisyEater View Post
                            ...If I was doing raw, I doubt I could even give them an adjustment period.
                            The dogs went over pretty easily, tho i didnt have a clue what i was doing when i first started, lol! I just cut their kibble in half and started giving them raw eggs! Then I found some raw-feeding groups online and got some knowledge.

                            The cats, however, I'm told are just more finicky. Like you're supposed to get them off dry kibble on to a good wet food. then intro the 'raw' food. You've got to heat up their food cuz they don't like it cold. And it can take weeks to get them switched over.

                            Hence me dragging my feet on the poor cats!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by it1958 View Post
                              The dogs went over pretty easily, tho i didnt have a clue what i was doing when i first started, lol! I just cut their kibble in half and started giving them raw eggs! Then I found some raw-feeding groups online and got some knowledge.

                              The cats, however, I'm told are just more finicky. Like you're supposed to get them off dry kibble on to a good wet food. then intro the 'raw' food. You've got to heat up their food cuz they don't like it cold. And it can take weeks to get them switched over.

                              Hence me dragging my feet on the poor cats!
                              And I would be transitioning the fosters to raw only to have them likely dumped back on commercial food when they got adopted. I don't know if it would be worth it for that short time. Maybe I should try feeding a bit of both. I already try to get them to eat more wet than dry food. Some just like the kibbles, though. Unsurprisingly, they're the ones that tend to get chubby.

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