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  • 9 surefire ways to sabotage your weight loss

    Check out this article from Summer Tomato:

    9 surefire ways to sabotage your weight loss

    One of my favorite sites for healthy eating ideas. I absorb lots of wise words regularly from Summer Tomato.

  • #2
    Some valid points, some I don't entirely agree with. I think willpower is so heavily undermined nowadays, too many people have that mentality of "you're just NOT strong enough, so don't even try" and I don't agree with that. The media especially tells us this all the time, and would rather believe we need their help in the form of expensive workout equipment that is typically useless, or pills, or other stuff, but plain ol' "just say no to bad foods" is somehow impossible.

    I'm not saying it's fun, I'm saying it's perfectly doable. The rest of the article I do agree with.
    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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    • #3
      i think charles eisenstein talks about the issue of will power in "the yoga of eating" really beautifully. how it's not about will power at all, but the connection between our minds, our bodies, our patterns, and truly being observant of our behaviors.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by zoebird View Post
        i think charles eisenstein talks about the issue of will power in "the yoga of eating" really beautifully. how it's not about will power at all, but the connection between our minds, our bodies, our patterns, and truly being observant of our behaviors.
        this is why i dont think people should count calories/portions/macros
        Get on my Level
        http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zoebird View Post
          i think charles eisenstein talks about the issue of will power in "the yoga of eating" really beautifully. how it's not about will power at all, but the connection between our minds, our bodies, our patterns, and truly being observant of our behaviors.
          I would certainly agree with that, but I also think just willing yourself to do or not do is a powerful thing in and of itself. People can surprise themselves by showing just a wee bit of commitment.

          This is of course provided that whatever it is we’re attempting to do is logical and all of that. Whole30 for instance, requires a lot of willpower at first, and at varying degrees for different folks, but it is still an achievable endeavor (I did it) albeit a little neurotic and perhaps not all that necessary to begin.

          Through doing whole30 I didn’t learn anything about my body with regards to food sensitivities, but I did learn that I have enough will power to resist temptations, etc.

          Anyway, not to deviate from the topic so much, I just don’t like how accepted lack of will power seems to be.
          I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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          • #6
            http://summertomato.com/is-it-health...ike-a-caveman/

            Here she discusses the Paleo diet. I felt that she gave it a fair shake. While I understand that most here wouldn't peg their own personal diet as a "Paleo" diet per se (a group to which I belong), I thought that some might find the article interesting.

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            • #7
              I think the thing about willpower is that so many people have an "all or nothing" approach to any sort of lifestyle change. When they inevitably slip up (since most of us will at one point or another), they tend to throw in the towel entirely and chalk it up to a "lack of willpower." I think it's healthier to just pick yourself up and keep going - which is why I like the 80-20 philosophy of PB. I think having a really strong willpower and just muscling through something is awesome, and I think it's also healthy to (once in awhile) say to yourself "screw willpower, I'm going to have a piece of chocolate and then get back on the wagon." As long as it's truly once in awhile and doesn't totally undermine your progress.

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              • #8
                i thought her paleo blog was silly: cut out rice and legumes, and you cut out the whole cuisines of many cultures -- indian, italian, greek, japanese. . .. ridiculous! i eat a ton of curry, just without rice and legumes. i made meat balls in home made sauce yesterday (to eat today) and a fennel dish that came from my fav italian cookbook. the greeks hae this amazing lamb stew that i love, and look forward to trying. doro wat is the etheopean national dish -- it's chicken stew and usually bean free.

                when i was vegetarian, i ate these various cuisines, just avoiding those recipes that had meat. now i avoid those aspects that include legumes or grains. it's not difficult, and you still get to enjoy the traditional cuisines of many cultures. Heck, i had traditional thai from our fav restaurant on Saturday. i just didn't eat the rice. it was fab (and no, there was no flour, etc in it. i know the family's recipe!).

                i think that will power comes into play in the idea of holding to your values. if you value the paleo diet somehow (for whatever reasons), then when you are confronted with the choice between a non-paleo thing and a paleo thing, you'll choose to hold to your values. that being said, if you don't, it's not like you lack will power, you just chose against your values. and everyone does this all the time.

                a lot of people also misuse will power. my FIL *loves* to talk about how he has so much will pwer. pardon my sexist language about it, but in many ways the man is a pussy. sure, he can "will power" his way to only having two cookies, but he can't will power himself to stop his daughter from driving drunk. he can will power himself to only have one cup of decaf coffee per day, but he can't will power himself to ask his boss for a raise or leave if he doesn't get one (to seek a better job elsewhere). So, he has will power where it *doesn't* count all that much. at least, not in my mind. two or ten cookies is meaningless. if you truly want 10, eat 10. if you truly believe your daughter should not drive home drunk, and you have the capacity to drive her yourself, why would you give in just because she's upset and angry at you for saying 'you're too drunk to drive, i'm driving you home?" becuase, boys and girls, he did do that, and i drove her home, and he *begged* me to "let her go because she's so upset." and i looked him square in the face and said "Christmas day is not a day for you, or anyone else, to loose a child because you allowed someone to drive home drunk." girl couldn't even stand up straight, and he was going to let her drive! that's a f'ing pussy with no will power.

                in running my own business, i daily need the will power -- the personal fortitude -- to hold to my vision of this business, stick to the process that will make it successful, and hold my own emotions in check (in balance). that is will power. not whether or not i had an ice cream binge or a big 20% today or whatever, kwim?

                my FIL can wax poetic and try to shame me when i have 8 grapes after 8 pm (don't you know that makes you fat?) regarding will power, but when push comes to shove, he's a weakling. he will cave. i won't.
                Last edited by zoebird; 01-19-2011, 03:18 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by iniQuity View Post
                  Some valid points, some I don't entirely agree with. I think willpower is so heavily undermined nowadays, too many people have that mentality of "you're just NOT strong enough, so don't even try" and I don't agree with that. The media especially tells us this all the time, and would rather believe we need their help in the form of expensive workout equipment that is typically useless, or pills, or other stuff, but plain ol' "just say no to bad foods" is somehow impossible.
                  Agreed. I find that I do best relying on my willpower. I feel pretty cool when I will myself to stick to my guns, cuz I AM strong enough.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                    i thought her paleo blog was silly: cut out rice and legumes, and you cut out the whole cuisines of many cultures -- indian, italian, greek, japanese. . .. ridiculous! i eat a ton of curry, just without rice and legumes. i made meat balls in home made sauce yesterday (to eat today) and a fennel dish that came from my fav italian cookbook. the greeks hae this amazing lamb stew that i love, and look forward to trying. doro wat is the etheopean national dish -- it's chicken stew and usually bean free.
                    Let me say that while I understand where you're coming from (and am in complete agreement with you), I also understand where she is coming from.

                    For most people, it is simply impossible to imagine an Italian dish without pasta, or a Chinese dish without rice or noodles, etc. The grain of the meal is inextricably linked with the ethnicity of the dish, in some sense, for most people. This, to me, is an instance of what keeps many people off a diet as strict as a primal-ish diet: they immediately begin to think about all the things that they CAN'T have, rather than all the great things they still CAN have.

                    I'll admit, when I first began the diet, I lamented the fact that I wouldn't be able to eat pasta and meatballs or fried rice ever again, but have since learned that the best part about those dishes is not the grain, but the rest of the stuff. However, most people don't think in that manner.

                    For reasons related to this problem, whenever a person asks me to tell them more about the way I eat, I do my best to emphasize all the fantastic foods that I eat in abundance, rather than list all the things that I "can't" eat.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ephemeral10jf View Post
                      I'll admit, when I first began the diet, I lamented the fact that I wouldn't be able to eat pasta and meatballs or fried rice ever again, but have since learned that the best part about those dishes is not the grain, but the rest of the stuff. However, most people don't think in that manner. .
                      I thought that way a little too, maybe not "ever again" but now that it's almost been a full year for me I've learned that the human body is NOT all that weak and having SOME grain (if you choose to, not to be "normal" but just because you choose to) is not going to do all that much harm. Making it a part of your regular diet, eating it all the time or everyday, probably will (it certainly won't help keep you fit and healthy) but we are NOT that fragile where we must cut out all grain forever, BUT if one wishes to then it's not at all unhealthy, if anything it's way healthy.

                      That was my long way of saying I still eat some grains, and don't feel all that bad about it, because of the moderation that I employ. It's also how I still enjoy some traditional dishes of my culture, though I often have them without the grains as well. It also helps that I'm mostly talking about white rice which is pretty harmless but should be moderated if you're after fat loss.
                      I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by iniQuity View Post
                        Some valid points, some I don't entirely agree with. I think willpower is so heavily undermined nowadays, too many people have that mentality of "you're just NOT strong enough, so don't even try" and I don't agree with that. The media especially tells us this all the time, and would rather believe we need their help in the form of expensive workout equipment that is typically useless, or pills, or other stuff, but plain ol' "just say no to bad foods" is somehow impossible.

                        I'm not saying it's fun, I'm saying it's perfectly doable. The rest of the article I do agree with.
                        There's actually strong scientific evidence that willpower is a finite resource, and that reliance on a simple "just do it" mentality can be self-defeating. This article from the NYT briefly mentions some of the studies supporting this theory (like those done by Roy Baumeister).
                        http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/02/opinion/02aamodt.htm

                        That doesn't mean we need pills or whatever, but it does mean we need to arrange our circumstances to help out our fallible brains.
                        Join the Atlanta Primal/Paleo Meetup: http://www.meetup.com/Atlanta-Paleo-Primal-Meetup/

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                        • #13
                          i didn't think that way.

                          i thought "let me try it, see if it works for us, and go from there." and, it worked -- like crazy -- right away. so, that was reinforcing. it had such a small learning curve, and we dont' miss grains at all. of course, before moving to NZ, we hardly ate any grains at all, and we were both feeling rather sick of grians by the time we went primal.

                          and for me, the ethnicity of the food is the flavors -- really the seasonings -- not necessarily the grain that goes with it. and, most national dishes are actually meat based, not grain based. the grains are side dishes (or utensils in the case of some breads in some cultures), not the center stage.

                          so, i really do not get it.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                            and for me, the ethnicity of the food is the flavors -- really the seasonings -- not necessarily the grain that goes with it. and, most national dishes are actually meat based, not grain based. the grains are side dishes (or utensils in the case of some breads in some cultures), not the center stage.
                            This rings true for my culture, at least as far as main courses/entrees are concerned. That was easy for me, I just ate more meat and replaced the rice and beans with veggies, my family thought I was crazy for a few months but got used to it and even started imitating, none of them have gotten rid of the rice fully though, but we eat less of it overall.
                            I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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