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Primal groceries in a house with food allergies!

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  • Primal groceries in a house with food allergies!

    My son (6 y.o) is allergic to tree nuts and eggs. (He's also allergic to soy and peanuts, but that's okay!)

    He is not allergic to wheat or dairy, so that's a lot of what he eats. He's like every other SAD kid - he likes the junkier foods and stays farther from meats and veggies. He likes fruit okay.

    It's a challenge to say the least. Does anyone else have food allergies to work around?

  • #2
    Wow, I'm the only primal eater to contend with food allergies in my household?

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    • #3
      Well, the thing I had to avoid was wheat...so my "allergy" doesn't really figure into this one.
      Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

      If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

      Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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      • #4
        There are a lot of primal options that are not eggs and nuts....meats, green veggies, fruit? Your kid is only 6, shouldn't he be eating what you feed him?

        I am not a parent, but I have always been confused about parents who say their kid loves junk food. It's not like he went out and bought the little debbies himself. A parent had to put them in the cupboard. Why is it hard to replace the junk with a good variety of fruits and veggies?

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        • #5
          It's true. He eats what I bring into the house. But it's hard to make the switch. It's hard for many adults to make the switch, so it's also difficult to try to explain to our 6 y.o. that "I know it WAS once something we used to eat, but it's really not very good for us anymore." That's a hard concept for him. Why was it okay last week? Last month? No one died or got sick.
          It's also very difficult when we are outside of our little home bubble, involved with other households or activities. School, extended family, social functions. Food is everywhere and it's mainly SAD, as we all know.
          Nuts accomodate the "breads/muffins/cookies/bars" with nut flours and eggs would be a great option for a breakfast food, but he cannot have those.
          I'm trying to wrap my brain around limiting his entire food intake to meat, veggies and fruit and figuring out a way to prep these things for other times outside of our kitchen, without being able to rely on the "primal recipes" that include nuts and eggs.

          Trust me, I don't feed him crap in a can or easy mac or anything - far from it! But he eats a lot of grains from varying sources.
          Last edited by putmama; 01-14-2011, 12:45 PM.

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          • #6
            The way I wrapped my brain around it was realizing a non-primal diet is pretty much garbage. You wouldn't feed you kid garbage, would you?

            I'm certain if you have stuck with the primal lifestyle for any length of time you realize how huge of a difference it makes in how you feel about yourself. How your energy levels have improved drastically, annoying little things have all but disappeared simply by not eating this garbage. It can't be that hard to wrap your brain around feeding your kid some meat/veggies/fruit for breakfast. Not with all the benefits that come from not feeding him sad.

            SAD food may be everywhere, but it is your duty as a parent to protect your child from this, plain and simple. Pack a lunch, carry an extra snack in your purse, just plan and simple plan ahead.

            Comment


            • #7
              You'll get a lot more responses eventually... a lot of peeps just pop in here once a day or once a week, so it may just take a bit for it to pick up.

              You can also use the search function on this forum for "kids, children, allergies" and you'll come up with a ton of material. I think there's probably been at least 50 threads dealing with kids and food and some with allergies in the past couple of months.

              My kids are older, but when I used to explain things to them (why can't I, why whatever), I'd tell them "I'm telling you why so you know my reason. I'm NOT telling you why so you can argue with me about it. " Arguing would always result in an immediate time out or time in the room, or whatever. They learned pretty quick not to argue about it, and still I got to let them know why I'd decided something. A little kid can understand "We used to eat this but mommy has been learning about food and what's healthy and I can't give you food that's going to keep you from being big and strong." They may not LIKE it, but they can understand it.

              And, as I mentioned on another thread this morning, you can make yummy meals for him that he likes and slowly remove the bad stuff as well. Mockafoni and cheese (which uses cauliflower instead of pasta) is super good and very mac n cheeselike, chicken strips rolled in coconut flour or shredded coconut, sweet potato fries, sunflower & sesame seed crackers, dehydrated veggies for chips... there are things you can do to "replace" some of the bad stuff while you're making the transition.
              sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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              • #8
                with new friends / social situations, you could bend the truth a little and just explain away your "weirdness" as "allergy issues". Old friends might query why he *used* to be fine on grains, but really, allergies can come and go........

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                • #9
                  I understand what you're saying, I do. I guess he'll just starve until he eats the meat/veggies/fruit. And I'll deal with the confusion over why we won't give him biscuits or whatever.

                  It's a trust issue, with him. He already knows that he can't trust to eat what other people give him (because he knows about his allergies to eggs/nuts, peanuts, soy and grapes) but now we're going to shake it up and tell him he can't have all of the stuff we've given him that WAS deemed safe.
                  It's hard, it just is.

                  My husband went paleo on a 30 day challenge and lost 25 pounds, it was amazing. But he stopped when he lost his job and it's been hard to put the "right" foods out.
                  He's employed again now, and I've kicked off my own primal challenge this past Monday. I do know what is good and what's not. But fo rme, it's weight loss and toning. My little bird of a son needs all the food he can take in!
                  So it's not exactly cut and dry, which is why I came here.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you Minxxa and NorthernMonkeyGirl. Those are very, very helpful.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      first, he will adapt and it's ok. he will be ok.

                      second, i would probably create a primal transition baked good that would suit him. i find that muffins seem to be easy for many parents, and so they create a muffin recipe that is primal and suits his needs.

                      then, he can have breakfast, lunch, dinner as primal (meat, veggies, fruit, dairy), and then he can have a "primal-ized" baked good that is still "safe" for him.

                      i'm actually thinking about a cheese biscuit that DH's grandmother makes, similar to this recipe:

                      wo cups Flour
                      three tsp. Baking Powder
                      one tsp. Refreshing Minced Thyme
                      1/2 tsp. Minced Refreshing Parsley
                      1/2 tsp. Minced Refreshing Rosemary
                      1/2 glass Cheddar Cheese
                      five tbs Butter
                      1/2 glass Milk
                      Instructions
                      The initial action in the direction of generating thyme and cheese biscuits would be to preheat the oven to four hundred levels.
                      Lubricate a cookie sheet and collection apart.
                      Mix flour, baking powder, herbs and cheese in a big bowl. Mix it nicely utilizing a fork. The combination is usually powdery in texture. Combine butter towards the mix.
                      Then, include milk and stir till dough holds collectively. If essential, include much more milk.
                      Utilizing a big spoon, Drop spoonfuls around the cookie sheet putting every piece an inch aside from one another and bake it for 10-12 mins.

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                      • #12
                        oh, and i don't know what would qualify as a primal flour and also meet your son's needs. i do not know, for instance, is his allergy includes coconuts -- a tree nut -- because you could use coconut flour.

                        of course, you could also think/feel/believe/make peace with this being part of his "20%" daily, wherein he gets something that is familiar, tasty, etc.

                        just a thought.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am a nanny for three kids who had to go on a diet similar to primal just to help their allergies/behavioral problems. Before, the boy would only eat beans and (glutenfree) tortillas and cereal, etc. etc. The girl lived on fruit and oatmeal, and would often down three in a 20 minute sitting. Needless to say, they were NOT looking forward to their new diet (more strict than paleo, even!).

                          The youngest moaned the least, but they all made a fuss. After a week of breaking the addiction to carbs, they were happy to eat their food - and now down completely paleo meals 3x a day with excitement! It's hard, especially if he experiences withdrawal from grains/sugar (the kids went through a lot) - and it seems like that is all that will make him better, but you are doing the right thing for him!

                          We do meat/veggie stir-frys, spaghetti squash (a big hit!), burgers, cucumber salads. Keep it very simple. And if he's anything like me or the kids (I have almost all his allergies but eggs!) keep him away from the "substitutes" for biscuits/bread, because he will favor that over any meat/veggies in the beginning, and it will prevent his healing.

                          Anyway, good luck!Hope I helpe da little

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oops! Forgot to include replacements for breadish type things that don't have nuts (they have serious nut allergies too!)

                            Carrot Cake Mouse -
                            "It’s not really a cake, nor really a mousse. Well, you’ll see. Steam 6-7 larger carrots. Into a loaf pan, put: the steamed carrots 1/2 cup ghee (let it melt); shredded coconut (1/2 cup or so); honey to taste; ginger (fresh, or 1 tsp or so powder); nutmeg (1 tsp or so); sea salt; 2 large eggs. Preferably before the eggs have a chance to “cook” on the heat of the carrots, with a handheld blender mix all of the above. It should end up quite fluffy. Bake at 300 degrees for 50-60 minutes. The result should be a moist but firm, mousse-like consistency with a slightly drier top layer. Best when eaten warm. My son and I really enjoyed this. We have also done it without the shredded coconut and enjoyed it. "
                            (Nix the eggs! You can add squash, flax seed, baking powder/soda - can't remember which one is the replacement. Just google egg replacers)


                            "Squash Muffins" - squash is a great replacement for eggs. I blend it up with carrots, nutmeg, ghee, water, cinnamon, and slow cook at 200 degrees in little muffin tins until it starts to resemble something worth eating! No specific recipie, just make it until it looks right. It's always good!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                              first, he will adapt and it's ok. he will be ok.

                              second, i would probably create a primal transition baked good that would suit him. i find that muffins seem to be easy for many parents, and so they create a muffin recipe that is primal and suits his needs.

                              then, he can have breakfast, lunch, dinner as primal (meat, veggies, fruit, dairy), and then he can have a "primal-ized" baked good that is still "safe" for him.

                              i'm actually thinking about a cheese biscuit that DH's grandmother makes, similar to this recipe:
                              Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                              oh, and i don't know what would qualify as a primal flour and also meet your son's needs. i do not know, for instance, is his allergy includes coconuts -- a tree nut -- because you could use coconut flour.

                              of course, you could also think/feel/believe/make peace with this being part of his "20%" daily, wherein he gets something that is familiar, tasty, etc.

                              just a thought.
                              This helps so much. Thank you!
                              He has eaten coconut and never presented any allergic reaction to it, so I think we may be able to use that. We'll continue to check!

                              Originally posted by lexsi340 View Post
                              I am a nanny for three kids who had to go on a diet similar to primal just to help their allergies/behavioral problems. Before, the boy would only eat beans and (glutenfree) tortillas and cereal, etc. etc. The girl lived on fruit and oatmeal, and would often down three in a 20 minute sitting. Needless to say, they were NOT looking forward to their new diet (more strict than paleo, even!).

                              The youngest moaned the least, but they all made a fuss. After a week of breaking the addiction to carbs, they were happy to eat their food - and now down completely paleo meals 3x a day with excitement! It's hard, especially if he experiences withdrawal from grains/sugar (the kids went through a lot) - and it seems like that is all that will make him better, but you are doing the right thing for him!

                              We do meat/veggie stir-frys, spaghetti squash (a big hit!), burgers, cucumber salads. Keep it very simple. And if he's anything like me or the kids (I have almost all his allergies but eggs!) keep him away from the "substitutes" for biscuits/bread, because he will favor that over any meat/veggies in the beginning, and it will prevent his healing.

                              Anyway, good luck!Hope I helpe da little
                              Originally posted by lexsi340 View Post
                              Oops! Forgot to include replacements for breadish type things that don't have nuts (they have serious nut allergies too!)

                              Carrot Cake Mouse -
                              "It’s not really a cake, nor really a mousse. Well, you’ll see. Steam 6-7 larger carrots. Into a loaf pan, put: the steamed carrots 1/2 cup ghee (let it melt); shredded coconut (1/2 cup or so); honey to taste; ginger (fresh, or 1 tsp or so powder); nutmeg (1 tsp or so); sea salt; 2 large eggs. Preferably before the eggs have a chance to “cook” on the heat of the carrots, with a handheld blender mix all of the above. It should end up quite fluffy. Bake at 300 degrees for 50-60 minutes. The result should be a moist but firm, mousse-like consistency with a slightly drier top layer. Best when eaten warm. My son and I really enjoyed this. We have also done it without the shredded coconut and enjoyed it. "
                              (Nix the eggs! You can add squash, flax seed, baking powder/soda - can't remember which one is the replacement. Just google egg replacers)


                              "Squash Muffins" - squash is a great replacement for eggs. I blend it up with carrots, nutmeg, ghee, water, cinnamon, and slow cook at 200 degrees in little muffin tins until it starts to resemble something worth eating! No specific recipie, just make it until it looks right. It's always good!
                              What a relief to know that someone else has broken past the addiction with kids and lived to tell about it! I mean, I have all the authority as the parent - and I know my role here - but it's HARD to see your kids unhappy for something that shouldn't be a huge deal, like food. Especially when we've had to restict so many "normal" things in his diet already. Anyway, THANK YOU for the encouragement. This is huge.
                              And great recipe too! He seems to tolerate eggs fine in baked goods (cakes, cookies, muffins) - something about the proteins breaking down after reaching a certain temperature. But merengue or most eggy-dishes are off limits until we get him tested again in a year or so. I don't know if I could bake this at a slightly higher heat or try the squash replacement. Either way sounds delicious, really.

                              Thank you very much.
                              Now we just have to get other people to support this. Hubby's parents are going to think I've lost my ever-loving mind. Here we go!

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