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  • coconut oil



    I bought my first jar of coconut oil the other day...it is organic and came from the healthfood store. BUT...it is solid, all the time.


    What is the best way to melt it for use in recipes where it's clear it needs to be liquid rather than solid, without actually melting it on the stove?


    Thanks.


  • #2
    1



    You can heat indirectly by putting something in a water-bath (bain-marie in cooking). Maybe you could try that technique.


    It wouldn't take a lot of heat to make coconut oil liquid. It would be on a hot day anyway. You could probably put a spoonful or two in a small glass or an eggcup or something. Pour some hot water from a tea kettle into a small saucepan and stand the glass in that; the contents will probably liquify in a few seconds. You can then pour it into what you want.

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    • #3
      1



      Thank you!

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      • #4
        1



        That's why God gave us the microwave.

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        • #5
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          Yeah, but microwave cooks it. If you need it for all-raw recipes, than you would want to melt it with indirect heat. You can put it on top of the hot stove when your oven is on but the top is just warm and it will melt it very quickly.


          You can also stick a chunk in your mouth Just kidding.

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          • #6
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            I just leave it on the counter by the stove when I'm cooking and the heat melts it.

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            • #7
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              CC, come on. Not only is the amount of heat controllable by the operator of the MW, its an oil! You gotta get it over 400 degrees to start having it break down.


              If you put it in your mouth, it just becomes coconut oil....very good.

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              • #8
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                Well, if you, for example, are following raw diet, MW is a big no-no. Molecular rearrangement is not a part of a truly raw product.

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                • #9
                  1



                  No molecules get rearranged.


                  They get to vibrating faster and faster, just like a stove.


                  And I certainly would not be a raw foodist. Did you see the link a week ago to an interview with a guy who holds that cooking is a reason we grew bigger brains? And that cooking usually makes more nutrients available?


                  And, food mostly just tastes better!

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                  • #10
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                    I'm not a fan of raw eating either, but I know people who are and they are ptetty passionate about it

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                    • #11
                      1



                      Food IS religion. People will often believe anything someone tells them. Just like religion. They will believe things with all the evidence to the contrary. They will suffer in their choices because they think that makes them purer, (or closer to God.)


                      Why would anyone want to have an eating regimen that already pretty much excludes meat, if not completely, for an even less satisfying palette?


                      Passion is a poor marker for logic. In fact, they are in contradiction.

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                      • #12
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                        Well, don't make me the bad guys here I was just trying to asnwer the original question.

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                        • #13
                          1



                          I second the suggestion of a warm water bath. Just run it under the tap or soak it in an immersion for a while. Coconut oil melts at 84F. That shouldn't be too hard to reach at all.


                          Or just move to the tropics. When I was a kid, our coconut oil was always liquid.

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                          • #14
                            1



                            Coconut oil melts at 76 degrees, not 84. If it is higher than 76, it has been hydrogenated. Some are for things like cosmetics or soap.


                            My CO is liquid in the summertime, average house temp is 79 degrees. It's a gooey solid in the winter time, typical temp about 74 degrees.

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                            • #15
                              1



                              I'm in Sonoma County, which means my oil turns solid every night and liquid every day. So it's usually in a transitional semi-liquid state when I fix breakfast and dinner.


                              (It's sorta like that movie, Ladyhawke, when Michelle Pfieffer and Rutger Hauer get to see each other in human form for a brief moment before they turn into hawk or wolf.)

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