Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Making bone broth overnight - possible with an electric burner?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Making bone broth overnight - possible with an electric burner?

    Is it a Bad Idea to leave a pot of bone broth simmering on an electric burner overnight? Dad sez it'll burn out the coils in the burner if I leave it on that long, and I have no idea if he's right.
    * Pixy's Quest for Regaining Health *
    Trying to gain weight, clear scarring acne, and fix thyroid and digestive issues with primal lifestyle- here goes something!

  • #2
    I have an electric stove, but always use my crockpot for low & slow cooking- mostly because it uses less electricity. I really have no idea. One would think that by now they'd make stoves that can handle prolonged use like that.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a flat top electric stove and have made stock overnight probably a dozen plus times so far. I turn it on super low, and I usually put a lid on (cracked a bit most often). I think the first night I left something on to cook like that I got up twice to check on it worried sick. Now I have to remind myself to check on it before I go to bed. I just make sure nothing is near the stove, the water level is good, temp is super low, etc.

      I know burner coils can burn out over time, but not sure about them burning out when left on for an extended period. I did see mention some folks putting it in their oven overnight as there was less 'fire' risk that way......not sure of the temp though.
      Erin
      Daily Vlogs
      Primal Pets Blog

      Comment


      • #4
        I have some bones in a crock pot as I type. The appliance is too cheap not to have one. I mean like well under $20: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Hamilton-B...ooker/11317137
        Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yeah I got my little crock-pot from big-lots for $10. I use it sooo much. Thats how i make my bone broth, too! Three days, baby.
          Little Saiyan

          Comment


          • #6
            I simmer stock on an electric burner all the time; at least once/week for 12-30 hours, for the past nearly five years. I have never used up an element. A crock pot would be a much better choice if you have room, though. I'm going to look into one. The reason I use the stove is that I do ten litres at a time, with a few birds at once, or lots of big bones.

            Comment


            • #7
              You might be able to find a slow cooker in a charity shop - some of the ones near where I live quite often have one in. Strangely, only some charity shops seem to be allowed to stock electrical goods - the others obviously wouldn't have one!

              Comment


              • #8
                People use electric stove burners to keep coffee hot for hours and so forth all the time. That said, a slow cooker is a great thing to have.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I prefer a crock pot over using an electric stove. Even when I have my stove on the lowest setting it will still come to a boil after a couple hours. The lid starts popping up and fluids slowly start to release. When I wake up I always have a mess on my stove and I always worry that something will catch on fire. I don't have any of these problems with the crock pot.
                  "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

                  People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks everyone for the input! I was able to cram most of the bones into my tiny slow cooker (no small task), so they're simmering in there right now. The burner would be way more convenient for big batches of broth, but still seems kinda risky, I guess!
                    * Pixy's Quest for Regaining Health *
                    Trying to gain weight, clear scarring acne, and fix thyroid and digestive issues with primal lifestyle- here goes something!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A super easy and cheap cheater way to make a bone broth is to add a quart of good quality chicken broth and a package of raw chicken legs to a slow cooker and let it go on low for 6-8 hours. I do this all the time and it always makes a broth that gels beautifully and I don't have to mess with piles of chicken bones and vegetable waste and all the skimming/straining. I usually throw a chopped onion in as well and then add the chicken meat back for a tasty chicken and onion soup.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use my coil type electric stove. at night i turn it as low as it'll go and still cook but that's just due to my fear of it completely dehydrating. i cook it at least 24 hours.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          is anyone concerned about the potential lead in the crocks? I don't use my crock for that reason, but I sure miss the slow cooker. For that reason, I now cook my broth just during the day so do not get a full 24-hr broth. But it still gels fabulously and tastes great!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Diana Renata View Post
                            I have an electric stove, but always use my crockpot for low & slow cooking- mostly because it uses less electricity. I really have no idea. One would think that by now they'd make stoves that can handle prolonged use like that.
                            Definitely second the crock pot. Although I smell the broth overnight and it sort of bothers my sleep! But I still do it. I actually leave it in the crockpot for 18 hours usually.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by it1958 View Post
                              is anyone concerned about the potential lead in the crocks? I don't use my crock for that reason, but I sure miss the slow cooker. For that reason, I now cook my broth just during the day so do not get a full 24-hr broth. But it still gels fabulously and tastes great!
                              What? Why did I not think about this? Lead?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X