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The New Evolution Diet - Art Devany

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Setabas View Post
    FairyRae, here are my thoughts on the Paleo Diet Cookbook:
    • It's paperback
    • Except for the cover, there are no pictures
    • Unlike many (if not most) cookbooks, there is actually about 52 pages of lead in to the cookbook, so if you didn't know a thing about Cordain's thoughts on the Paleo diet, you could actually learn enough about it to follow it from the lead in to the cookbook. While I don't necessarily agree with all he wrote, I think this is a great way to begin a diet specific cookbook.
    • There are sections on the basics, setting up the kitchen/shopping, etc.; breakfasts, snacks/appetizers, poultry, beef, port, lamb, bison, game meat, jerky, fish, seafood, salads, veggie dishes, condiments, salads, sauces, fruit purees, beverages, desserts, a two week meal plan and a section for crossfitters and athletes.


    The meal plan is a little bit of a disappointment. It essentially just lists the names of various dishes presented in the book. So Day 1 breakfast is simply a breakfast selection from the book. There are no weekly shopping lists or efforts to use today's protein in tomorrow's dishes (as Robb Wolf seems to do in his book, where he sets it up that some of the meats you cook for dinner can be utilized in tomorrow's planned lunch). So this plan would take a lot of work to set up a shopping list and coordinate it.

    As far as the recopies, they don't seem hard and I'm sure they'll be interesting to try even though I haven't done so yet.

    As I mentioned before he still seems to be anti-fat and anti-canned products (such as fish). I have canned tuna, sardines, anchovies, clams, chicken and turkey upon occasion and I wouldn't be able to be primal for 100% of my meals if I didn't as sometimes I just have time to grab a can, some greens and some olive oil.

    All in all, I think it will be nice to have some more recipes at my disposal to mix things up, so for me I think it was a very good purchase and while I like the Primal Blueprint cookbook more, the recipes in this book are not quite as gourmet and will probably be quicker for someone like me (limited cooking ability) to prepare easily.
    Thank youi so much for the details--very helpful!!
    My Before/After Pics
    Are you new here? Be sure to check these links FIRST, before reading anything on the forum! Succeed & PB 101

    "I am a work in progress." -Ani DiFranco

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    • #32
      I'm reading Art's book now. It has its high points and low points. Even if I don't agree with everything he says, I suspect that having a different perspective will be helpful overall.

      High point so far: The condition we generally think of as aging is more like disease.

      Low point: He thinks we stopped evolving 10,000 years ago. Sorry, Art.
      Start weight: 250 - 06/2009
      Current weight: 199
      Goal: 145

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      • #33
        Mark writes in his book that we could argue we are currently existing in a state of devolution. Or atleast that our diets are halting evolution. That always stuck with me.

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        • #34
          agree that a lot of aging is really disease, brought on by chronic malnutrition.

          seriously, i look at people on traditional diets, and even if they live *really hard* lives. . .well black and brown and yellow and red and white don't crack. but, if they live in a western way, all be crackin somewhere between 35 and 55.

          this white is vain enough to admit that she doesn't want to crack.

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          • #35
            I haven't read any of these books being mentioned, but this is a bit frustrating. As someone pointed out before, we will feel on the fence when it comes to the whole Art differing paleo/primal thing because we are concerned with eating Primally. But who is really right? No one really knows.
            All I know is that I will be doing a lot of reading, only then can a have an opinion.(Reading will not consist of Devany's book)
            You don't have to be sick to get well

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            • #36
              Originally posted by JWheelz View Post
              I tried reading Cordain's book after reading Good Calories, Bad Calories, and after a few pages talking up lean meats, I put it down.
              Same.

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              • #37
                Chris Masterjohn just published his review. Ouch.

                http://www.cholesterol-and-health.co...erol-blog.html

                Gordo

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                • #38
                  I bought and read the DeVany book and found it to be very disappointing. From reading his web site and his book, I think it's all about him and his ego, to be honest.

                  I've also read the new Taubes book. If you were able to follow and understand GCBC, the new book is unnecessary, IMO. It's more of a layman's distillation of the earlier book.

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                  • #39
                    Robb Wolf posted a blog on this topic and I am comfortable with him, cordain and devany having a more moderate stance on saturated fats.

                    http://robbwolf.com/2008/04/11/weston-price-vs-paleo/

                    I think this about sums up why Devany, Mark's and everyone's stance on saturated fat is really minutia.
                    If your food is fast, maybe you should fast.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Kaeden View Post
                      Robb Wolf posted a blog on this topic and I am comfortable with him, cordain and devany having a more moderate stance on saturated fats.
                      Did you read the review? Masterjohn makes Devany sound like a raving fat-phobe. That's not minutia, that's the crux of the whole PB.

                      Gordo

                      Gordo

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                      • #41
                        I browsed the review, but I don’t need to rely on it. I actually read the book. It seems no different in essence from the primal blue print or robb wolf’s recent book.
                        If your food is fast, maybe you should fast.

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                        • #42
                          I read Wolf's book. I thought it was pretty weak but entertaining. I guess I need to reread PB to remind myself of the PB stance on protein. I can't remember whether it's considered to be the main calorie source. I didn't think so, but it would have to be if you limit both carbs and fat. That seems like a risky strategy since excess protein causes all kinds of problems.

                          Gordo

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                          • #43
                            Define excess and problems.
                            If your food is fast, maybe you should fast.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by gordo View Post
                              I read Wolf's book. I thought it was pretty weak but entertaining. I guess I need to reread PB to remind myself of the PB stance on protein. I can't remember whether it's considered to be the main calorie source. I didn't think so, but it would have to be if you limit both carbs and fat. That seems like a risky strategy since excess protein causes all kinds of problems.

                              Gordo
                              From my understanding, protein is not really a source of calories per se, but rather, a source of structure. Humans, as animals, are made of fat and protein, and we eat protein to facilitate cell reproduction and maintenance. It may actually have been in the PB (or in Wolf's book), but thinking of eating protein for calories is like using the wood that your house's walls are made out of for your fireplace.

                              I'm glad I didn't buy DeVany's book, as I did think about it. There seems to be plenty of sources out there that have some things down validly, but still lack validity in other areas (like saturated fats). On the other hand, many people discover the primal/paleo lifestyle through these "gateway books." I can personally testify that if it wasn't for the "Warrior Diet" book, I would have found MDA. In hindsight, the warrior diet book is pretty silly with all of the claims it made. In it, the author (Ori) claimed that we must eat things like beans because the Roman soliders at them, and they were strong. He also encouraged carb days once a week (similar to carb refeeds), although he said that eating things like grains was fine. I did blindly follow it for a while, but soon enough discovered MDA and lived happily since.
                              --
                              Here it is, your moment of zen.

                              It's a no brainer: The journal of the cerebelum

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Kaeden View Post
                                Define excess and problems.
                                Ammonia poisoning. Threshold for ammonia production can be as low as 600-800 calories per day.

                                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4...t=AbstractPlus

                                Some ammonia is converted to urea, which can cause gout. Conversion peaks at around 900 calories per day. Go higher, and ammonia levels have to rise.

                                Protein levels above 45% of calories cause nausea and diarrhea in days and death in weeks. I'd call death a problem.

                                Mothers milk is 7% protein. Babies grow fast and put on lots of muscle. Why would you need more? Specifically: The protein content of muscle is 16.4%. Adding half a pound of muscle per week requires an astonishing 5g of protein per day. On top of that, clinical trial have not shown additional muscle gains in bodybuilders from increased protein intake.

                                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...t=AbstractPlus

                                The body is only capable of using about 400 calories of protein per day to manufacture glucose and ketones. That's all you can get rid of that way, and you probably need to be close to zero carb to do it.

                                So, here we have a macronutrient that we need a limited amount of, can only process a limited amount of, that creates toxic byproducts when consumed in high quantity, and results in a rapid death at very achievable levels. Telling people to limit carbs is great. Telling them to limit fat at the same time is dangerous and irresponsible. Fat is the only macronutrient that doesn't cause toxicity at high levels. We should eat only as many carbs and as much protein as we NEED, and get the rest from fat. If we want to be healthy, anyway.

                                Gordo
                                Last edited by gordo; 02-03-2011, 04:03 PM. Reason: Spaz finger, sent before finishing

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