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  • Kids and milk...

    First a little background...I have 2-year-old twin boys that we had through a gestational surrogate. Consequently they grew up on infant formula - soy, no less due to allergic reactions to regular formula - and then soy milk, on the recommendations of our pediatrician. (I just read the thread on soy milk and I am more than a little concerned).

    My dilemma - We recently were able to give them whole milk without them breaking out in a terrible rash. They have had runny noses and cold-like symptoms for a couple of months with no apparent cause, then I put two and two together and thought it might be a less-severe reaction to the milk. Lo and behold, after a few days off of the milk (and back to soy milk), they seem much, much better.

    I'm now at a loss for what to give them in place of soy. They are pretty good at eating whatever we eat, but they still love their milk. I considered almond milk, and they do like it, but I wonder if large quantities of it is a good idea.

    Our pediatrician doesn't seem at all concerned about the soy milk, but the more I read the worse I feel about having given it to them for this long.

    Any ideas for a suitable replacement?

  • #2
    I personally love coconut milk - you can water it down to give it a more milk-like texture.
    The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

    You were sick, but now you're well, and there's work to do. - Kilgore Trout

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    • #3
      Coconut milk! Contains lauric acid (also in breastmilk.) Goat's milk works for some--different composition.
      Also, some children can drink RAW milk easily, though pasteurized will cause issues.

      Are they grain-free? If not, I highly recommend getting them off grains or at the very least gluten-free. Most milk sensitivities are cause by leaky gut syndrome which is often caused by gluten intolerance.
      Ancestral Nutrition Coaching
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      Primal Pregnancy Nutrition Article

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      • #4
        Coconut milk is awesome, I also don't see any harm in almond milk, my parents have used it for years as my mom is lactose intolerant and it's more reasonably priced than coconut. I would also limit the amount of "milk" that you give them, else it's going to be very expensive and with coconut or almond it's going to be a ton of calories, mostly good fats but it's still going to fill them up and supplant other foods.

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        • #5
          When we cut down on the amount of milk my daughter drinks per day that helped as well. She gets about 4oz in the morning and 4 oz with dinner and water during the day. Occasionally I'll do a 80/20 split of water and juice. I don't think she has a milk intolerance, but she doesn't have a runny nose, etc. very often anymore. I wouldn't mind taking her off milk, but I would like for her to at least be gluten free if she's not going to be grain free. Would that be a beneficial "compromise"?

          Nice, well-meaning family members have already given her too much sugar and now we must fight this battle! I discovered primal too late to start her on primal foods from the get-go.

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          • #6
            Another vote for coconut milk. But if it's a choice of almond vs. soy milk, I'd definitely go with the almond.

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            • #7
              yup, i would do coconut, and if not that, then almond.

              my son just gets breastmilk, and the occasional (1 oz) of raw cow's milk when he asks for it. he also gets kefir. you can do coconut kefir, which i bet is pretty amazing.

              and we can get a fair bit of coconut cream. that is *good* stuff. my son loves it with his blueberries.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the comments!

                I think we'll try alternating all of the above, depending on their likes/dislikes. Too much of any one thing is probably best avoided.

                We need to start cutting down on the amount of milk they get anyway...

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                • #9
                  Coconut milk is great. But there's absolutely no problem with almond milk.

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                  • #10
                    I'd focus less on the need to find a milk replacement on more on the nutrient density of the diet as a whole.

                    In an evolutionary environment, we simply wouldn't have been able to get in 3 servings of dairy per day (or any dairy) but there would have been meat, organ meat, some eggs (likely), some plants, tubers etc

                    I wouldn't sub coconut milk directly as the rapid switch to that amount of SaFA will likely cause some seriously loose stools.

                    I have some good infant/toddler feeding info linked from my google doc (below)....much (but not all) of it is based on WAPF info. I have some issues with them but well...there you have it

                    Be sure that milk substitutes aren't taking the place of the more imporant zinc and Ω3 containing foods...organ meats, bone marrow, bone broths, fatty muscle meat, fish, oysters etc.

                    Nutritionally speaking, there are vast differences between cow's milk, coconut milk and almond milk. Almond milk it almost nutritionally and calorically void - it's not an appropriate food for 2 yo children in any significant quantity. But I wouldn't focus on cow milk or coconut milk either....though coconut milk will make a great adjunct to their diets.

                    Best,
                    Katherine



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                    • #11
                      I had the exact same symptoms until I got a share in a cow and started drinking raw milk. Symptoms gone. It's not so much an allergy as it is a deficiency in lactase. Lactase is an enzyme that breaks down lactose and is destroyed by pasteurization. Lactose intolerance should be called lactase deficiency. However, even saying that, there are some who still can't drink raw milk but that number is very small.

                      This dead, processed food they recommend to us is unhealthy and certainly not primal. I was raised on soy milk and constant antibiotics given to me by doctors. I am still healing from that nightmare and I am 26.

                      This article will clear things up for you

                      http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...ongestion.aspx

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                      • #12
                        Also when it comes to doctors and pediatricians...trust but VERIFY. Those people damn near killed me because they beat my immune system down so bad that I almost died of salmonella when I was 8. And they blamed all my problems I had on my genetics.

                        It's easy now to verify because you have the internet to research. Whatever you do, don't take a doctors word as truth without verifying. Most are very very clueless.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by geologger View Post
                          Thanks for the comments!

                          I think we'll try alternating all of the above, depending on their likes/dislikes. Too much of any one thing is probably best avoided.

                          We need to start cutting down on the amount of milk they get anyway...
                          That's probably the best way to look at it. Kids shouldnt be getting any significant source of their calories from beverages (except babies w/ breastmilk). My girls are 2 1/2 yrs and they've gone through stages of wanting to drink only juice to only milk and when I took them off milk we went to coconut and almond milks but they would drink that all day if I let them and it would displace real nutrition. And, yes, I've tried to take it all away and just offer water and they would. not. drink. at. all. So now I let them have water in the morning and juice mixed w/ water only after they've eaten breakfast, then some milk *after* lunch and only water with snack time. They get offered water with dinner too but if they ask for milk they are not allowed to have it until after dinner and they're usually too full to drink much. then water before bed. Overall, I've cut their calories from beverages quite a bit. They each only get about 2-3 oz of juice a day and maybe 6 oz of milk/coconut milk. If I could get raw milk I'd let them drink more

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                          • #14
                            The only other thing no one has mentioned is the difference between A2 and A1 milk. Basically, humans evolved drinking A2 milk but in the past ~ 30 years we switched over to A1 milk because those breeds of cows give a lot more milk than the A2 breeds of cows. My sister cannot drink A1 milk but she has no problems with A2.
                            A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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                            • #15
                              Cillakat has some great suggestions. Bone broths are perfect for kids - use them to make blended soups with any kind of veg, add meat chunks and it's perfect. Canned fish is also great as long as it's got bones in it. The important thing is the fats, protein and calcium - as long as you're getting those in somehow, you needn't worry if it looks like milk or not. Coconut milk is fine but I don't think it's got enough protein or calcium in it.

                              If you poke around the WAPF site (www.westonaprice.org) they have a dairy-free formula recipe - you could try it, but I really doubt a 2-year-old would go for it.

                              ETA: 2-year-olds would NOT have a problem with lactase deficiency. That doesn't hit until age 5 or so, when the human body naturally stops producing lactase, except in those with mutations to continue lactase production into adulthood. The problem is more likely a reaction to cow's milk proteins.

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