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seasoning cast iron, Olive Oil vs Vegetable oil

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  • seasoning cast iron, Olive Oil vs Vegetable oil

    holla
    I just got some new cast iron pans and am trying to take care of them. Everything I am reading is that Vegetable oil is better to season the pans with then Oilive Oil, due to the fact olive oil has a higher chance of going rancid. Since I [or we] dont use vegetable oil, do you think seasons the pans with it will somehow transfer all its negative processed qualities to my food while cooking?

  • #2
    Use coconut oil.
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    • #3
      i have my great-grandmothers cast iron pans and im in love with them. they are the only things i cook with- very well loved and very well seasoned after almost 100 years of use. my grat grandma was a homesteader and farmer in colorado, so these pans have seen their fare share of lard over the century, too. even though they are well broken in, i find i have to reseason them a few times a year, especially if someone inadvertently washes them (a big no-no! dont let these babies see any soap EVER, and water only if you cant avoid it! just clean them by wiping them out with a cloth or paper towel.)

      i actually use lard to season. vegetable oil is definitely better than oiive oil, but it can leave a sticky residue. but, if you cant get lard or bacon grease, vegetable oil works well in a pinch. coat the pan everywhere, stick it in a 300 degree oven for ten or fifteen minutes, take it out and wipe out the excess fat then put it back in and bake it for a few hours at that same temperature. if you do it a couple of times in a row, it will be perfect, but if you only have time for once, that is perfectly fine, too. the first time you season it, do as through a job as you can though and you will be happier. you dont have to use high quality lard for this stuff- i use the store bought and save my pastured fresh pork lard from the farm for eating. the fat just bakes into the iron making it a nonstick surface- you dont cook with the oil that was used to season the pan, so if you have to use veggie oil, dont worry about it. this seasoning process isnt something you do very often anyway. the fat you use for subsequent cooking will just reinforce the seasoning and keep it going strong. i find that when my food starts to stick, just cooking up some bacon will bring it back to the good shiny seasoned nonstickiness.

      your cast iron pan will become like an extension of your own arm after you have cooked with it for a while! i dont know what i would do without mine! you are going to love it!

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      • #4
        I like to cook things in lard or coconut oil.
        Remember, you are unique just like everybody else.

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        • #5
          Yup, lard.

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          • #6
            +1 on lard. See what Dr. M D Eades said about it ...

            http://www.proteinpower.com/drmd_blo...ll-they-learn/

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            • #7
              thanks everyone for your help. I did some more googling and found people are using bacon grease too, so I got to make some bacon this morning in the skillet and its seasoning as we speak, 2 more hours to go.

              also, looks like Lodge is having a holiday sale on select items!

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              • #8
                Use coconut oil or bacon fat. Or lard.
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                • #9
                  The last word on cast iron seasoning: http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/20...ing-cast-iron/
                  Wheat is the new tobacco. Spread the word.

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                  • #10
                    Does one season the entire pan, inside and out, or just the inside cooking surfaces?

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                    • #11
                      The whole thing, from what I understand.
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                      • #12
                        I season just the cooking surface. you don't need seasoning on the outside...

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                        • #13
                          Some people just season by using, and the whole pan eventually turns black. I have a young one- only 6 years old- and I did initially season the whole inside in the oven (with animal fat- always use animal fat for an excellent, non-stick, smooth surface), but the outside quickly blackened anyway.

                          My parents have one that is over thirty years old and slick as can be; they only ever use animal fat in it.

                          Also, a full-tang straight-edged spatula works wonders for smoothing the surface over time. New ones tend to be very bumpy because they don't machine them smooth like they did many decades ago. I used mine in that condition, but it's a bit tricky with things like eggs. Alternately, you could sand it smooth yourself, and when I buy another one, I will do that.

                          Also, you don't need to wash them with soap. I don't even wash mine at all; I leave the remaining fat from the food in there and use it next time. If something has become stuck (scrambled eggs sometimes do this), once the food is removed from the pan, I quickly pour about a cup of water in the hot pan, which causes the stuck food to separate from it, then I scrape it down and re-fat it once the water has evaporated. Never leave t to heat up to smoking. This breaks down the cured fat covering the pan surface and puts nasty black bits in your food.

                          I love cast iron!

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                          • #14
                            You season the entire pan, inside and out, handle and everything. The purpose of seasoning is not just to produce a good cooking surface, it also serves to protect the pan against rust.

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                            • #15
                              great advice here. my question: any input,ideas or knowledge re rehabing/reworking used/abused cast iron,like from the flea market? many expensive pieces can be had cheap if they are "fixable".

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