Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How to offset effects of grain-fed meat, eggs, etc.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to offset effects of grain-fed meat, eggs, etc.

    I have been on the Primal pathway just over a month. I've lost ten pounds, gotten rid of plantar fasciitis, discovered that, at age 57, I can still run.

    And this without eating an ounce of grass-fed beef.

    My economic and logistical reality is that I buy the meat and eggs available at the Price Rite down the street from me. Not organic, free-range, grass-fed or anything like that. (Though at another store I have found chicken thighs labeled "fed only vegetables," whatever that means.)

    Given this, what can I do nutritionally to offset the undoubted effects of eating grain-fed beef, chicken, eggs, whatever?

    Edith

  • #2
    'Fed only vegetables' sounds good, doesn't it?

    I think the idea is that the undesirable bit of conventionally-reared meat is the fat - both because that's where we store toxins, and because it's likely to be higher in omega 6 fats than the grass-fed type. So the advice is to eat lean meat and replace the fat with something better - coconut oil and/or organic ghee for cooking, oily fish to balance out the 3/6. (If the shop down the street sells mackerel, buy it!)

    Comment


    • #3
      Definitely go with a jar of coconut oil. It's expensive but soooo worth it!!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Authors of _The Perfect Health Diet_ http://perfecthealthdiet.com/?page_id=8 discuss how they eat conventional meat, but try to eat only beef for 2 days a week, only salmon (or other fatty fish) for 2 days of the week, and then the other 3 days eat fatty chicken and pork. Beef is lower in omega fats in general, and because the salmon is high in omega 3s, it will set off the negatives of eating the chicken and pork which is high in omega 6s (esp when conventionally raised.)

        You can also supp fish oil as well to set off the omega 6s in conventional meat.

        And, as pp's mentioned, you can always get lower fat cuts (skinless chicken breast etc) and add good fats like butter, coconut oil, coconut milk, EVOO etc...


        And a little OT but must be mentioned--jspradley, your Jayne Cobb hat rocks! Browncoats forever!
        My Before/After Pics
        Are you new here? Be sure to check these links FIRST, before reading anything on the forum! Succeed & PB 101

        "I am a work in progress." -Ani DiFranco

        Comment


        • #5
          You might buy the omega-3 enriched eggs. They generally feed the chickens flax seed in addition to all that corn. Just be careful when you read the labels, many egg cartons tout the 100-125 mg per egg as a health feature. That's about how much a typical battery egg has anyway. I have found eggs where the chickens were apparently fed fish. Stupid amounts of omega-3(~600mg per egg) but a hint of fishiness. Didn't bother me a bit, but my wife didn't like them.

          Chickens are not normally vegetarian. I'm very skeptical that vegetarian fed chickens are healthier or better for you. The eggs and flesh from chickens that eat bugs, frogs, snakes, etc. taste much, much better.

          Gordo

          Comment


          • #6
            Go for USDA Organic meats- much cheaper than grass-fed and much cleaner than feed lot meat.
            Mark suggests cooking those grain fed meats in grass-fed butter. Kerrygold is an excellent, inexpensive option. I get mine at Trader Joe's.

            Grass-fed [butter] isn’t as tough to find as you might think, though. And even if it’s more expensive, it’s still cheaper than shelling out the dough for exclusively grass-fed meat. In fact, for those of you who can’t regularly eat pastured meat, eating lean cuts of conventional meat cooked in a quality grass-fed butter is a great compromise.
            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/grass-fed-butter/
            Last edited by barryman9000; 12-12-2010, 11:35 AM. Reason: added link

            Comment


            • #7
              Eat more fish. Even farmed salmon and the like have great amounts of EPA and DHA. I would advise also that if you decide to eat farmed fish, make sure to cook them well so as to avoid any harmful bacteria or parasites.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes--canned salmon is a great source of omega 3s, and cheap too!
                My Before/After Pics
                Are you new here? Be sure to check these links FIRST, before reading anything on the forum! Succeed & PB 101

                "I am a work in progress." -Ani DiFranco

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pyrolimeade View Post
                  Even farmed salmon and the like have great amounts of EPA and DHA. I would advise also that if you decide to eat farmed fish, make sure to cook them well so as to avoid any harmful bacteria or parasites.
                  Farming salmon is incredibly bad for the environment. It's a CAFO where all the antibiotics and hormones get dumped into the surrounding estuary, too. I won't eat it on principle.

                  Gordo

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    To offset your consumption of omega 6 rich conventional meat I would suggest taking some fish oil supplements. It isn't ideal but its better than nothing. Ideal would be to obviously buy grass fed but like you said that could be pricey. You could buy large quantities of grass fed from a local ranch which will save a lot but you will need storage for all that meat. The fish oil supplements are a decent alternative, Robb Wolf has a fish oil calculator on his site to figure out how much you need.

                    BTW - Sometimes Costco will sell free range organic chicken for a very reasonable price if you have one near you.

                    Here is the link to the fish oil calcuator
                    http://whole9life.com/fish-oil/
                    "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

                    People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Balance View Post
                      To offset your consumption of omega 6 rich conventional meat I would suggest taking some fish oil supplements. It isn't ideal but its better than nothing. Ideal would be to obviously buy grass fed but like you said that could be pricey. You could buy large quantities of grass fed from a local ranch which will save a lot but you will need storage for all that meat. The fish oil supplements are a decent alternative, Robb Wolf has a fish oil calculator on his site to figure out how much you need.

                      BTW - Sometimes Costco will sell free range organic chicken for a very reasonable price if you have one near you.

                      Here is the link to the fish oil calcuator
                      http://whole9life.com/fish-oil/
                      I'd skip the fish oil calculator. It seems we should concentrate on reducing Omega-6 rather than adding Omega-3 from non-food sources. There have been more recent studies showing that supplementing with fish oil is bad for the liver at high doses. That calculator said I should be taking something like 9 capsules a day!
                      http://thehealthyskeptic.org/when-it...-is-not-better

                      In terms of grass fed meat, I wouldn't worry about Omega-3 content - in beef anyway. I don't know about pastured chicken vs caged chicken (anyone? I'd be curious to see the difference). When it comes to beef, the total amount of polyunsaturated fat is low enough that the ratio shouldn't be the main concern:
                      http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_9mNHNOMqaq...a3GraphFix.jpg

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for all replies. Lots of good, do-able suggestions. I feel much better about my options!

                        Edith

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X