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Gluten and milk are "necessary" components of a diet and I'm a bad mom

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  • Gluten and milk are "necessary" components of a diet and I'm a bad mom

    I had my final exam in pathophysiology today. Our essay question was about a mother whose child had elevated IgE responses to wheat, milk, eggs, and peanuts. Then 6 months later they "returned to normal." The mother had been telling people the kid was allergic to multiple foods and demanded bloodwork. The whole premise was that the mother was crazy because no one else had seen food reactions in the child and she was making it up. I wrote what he wanted me to write:

    Diagnosis: Munchausen syndrome by proxy (basically mother is crazy, making stuff up, demanding ridiculous testing, withholding necessary things from the child, etc).

    The whole scenario the prof gave basically demeaned the mother for "withholding age-appropriate food" from the child and how "dangerous" it was. You know, because milk, wheat, and peanuts are completely necessary for growth.

    The fact that my daughter never tested positive to these foods, but I don't give them to her because of health, makes me even crazier probably. Of course the reactions of diaper rash, temperment flares, and crying fits aren't at all signs those aren't appropriate foods for her.

    I'm just disgusted at the state of our medical system.
    Last edited by ShannonPA-S; 12-10-2010, 10:34 AM.

  • #2
    Isn't it sick that you have to lie and BS your way through your education? It would be nice if our society (especially the medical education system) would finally take off its nutritional blinders.

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    • #3
      What a drag Shannon. :-/

      this is not nearly as frustrating, but I'm studying to be an MFT (therapist) and there's no mention whatsoever of diet being an issue with depression. I'm not even sure I'd be able to mention diet to a client... sad state of affairs...
      sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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      • #4
        As a parallel (read, nothing to do with Primal whatsoever), to get your Professional Engineer's license, you have to prove minimal competency in all the basic engineering varieties and a strong proficiencies in one branch if one variety. For example, I specialize in Hydraulics and Hydrology in Civil Engineering. When I take the PE test, I am required to exhibit basic circuits knowledge, Dynamics knowledge, Heat and Mass transfer, engineering economics (that one I can at least understand requiring), biology, chemistry (more than basic, Chem I & chem II), and dif eq (a theoretical math course that is never used because empirical formulae work so much better.) All this as well as my proficiency test in H&H. The theory is that a PE can switch hit between engineerings given enough practice and these basic courses (a holdover from back when electrical engineering was in its infancy so for the most part only civil and mechanical existed.). The reality is that most people, even if they change fields, stay within their basic discipline (for example, I might switch to transportation engineering, but I stay within the bounds of civil engineering.) Engineers have been railing against this for YEARS. NCEES still hasn't accepted reality. The scary part is, any engineer can theoretically sign off on any set of plans and be held liable. I dunno abt you, but I don't want a bridge designer responsible for the chipset in my computer.
        All this long winded thing was to say, the health field ain't the only one that's been fouled like that.
        Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Minxxa View Post
          What a drag Shannon. :-/

          this is not nearly as frustrating, but I'm studying to be an MFT (therapist) and there's no mention whatsoever of diet being an issue with depression. I'm not even sure I'd be able to mention diet to a client... sad state of affairs...
          My therapist was fascinated when I told her my mood improved after Vit D supplementation and PB diet. Nutritional influence on mood had never occurred to her before. And she had done clinical work in a hospital setting. Amazing. I think she got more out of our sessions than I did.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aktres View Post
            My therapist was fascinated when I told her my mood improved after Vit D supplementation and PB diet. Nutritional influence on mood had never occurred to her before. And she had done clinical work in a hospital setting. Amazing. I think she got more out of our sessions than I did.
            LOL, I bet she did. And yes it's never spoken about. I'm going to have to investigate on my own to see if I can even suggest changes and additions (under the care of a physician OF COURSE). Maybe I'll just ahve to find a good doctor to be able to refer to...

            Naiad, that is crazy. Not surprising, but yes, crazy. It's amazing how non-adaptable our society has become.

            And BTW Shannon forgot to mention the obvious-- you're being a good mom. Sucks when your studies are intimating something as serious as Munchausen by proxy because someone notices the effects of foods on their child better than a doctor that hardly knows or sees them. Grrrr.
            sigpic "Boy I got vision and the rest of the world is wearing bifocals" - Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

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            • #7
              Minxxa, I'm sure you're reading this blog, but in case you haven't: http://evolutionarypsychiatry.blogspot.com/

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              • #8
                Actres, this points out something important. Information can flow in both directions between a doctor and a patient. These days, it seems to flow more often from the patient to the doctor than vice verse, especially for non-drug alternatives.

                Once in a great while, only a doctor will do. For the rest of the time, in my opinion, people are usually better off avoiding them. It all seems to be the result of a system where research is tied to possible profits from pharmaceuticals, which is REALLY TOO BAD.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by piano-doctor-lady View Post
                  Actres, this points out something important. Information can flow in both directions between a doctor and a patient. These days, it seems to flow more often from the patient to the doctor than vice verse, especially for non-drug alternatives.

                  Once in a great while, only a doctor will do. For the rest of the time, in my opinion, people are usually better off avoiding them. It all seems to be the result of a system where research is tied to possible profits from pharmaceuticals, which is REALLY TOO BAD.
                  The pharmaceutical industry is FUBAR. I started reading this article this week, and really hope I never have to take prescription drugs of any kind:


                  Deadly Medicine

                  Prescription drugs kill some 200,000 Americans every year. Will that number go up, now that most clinical trials are conducted overseas—on sick Russians, homeless Poles, and slum-dwelling Chinese—in places where regulation is virtually nonexistent, the F.D.A. doesn’t reach, and “mistakes” can end up in pauper’s graves? The authors investigate the globalization of the pharmaceutical industry, and the U.S. Government’s failure to rein in a lethal profit machine.

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                  • #10
                    I remember dropping gluten, dairy, soy and corn (b/4 becoming primal) b/c of my child's reactions to them. I remember feeling so upset--thinking "what are we going to eat?" after reading the ingredient labels of most of the foods I commonly ate.

                    It's SO crazy how limited the SAD is, when every single item people are eating on a regular basis contain the same 3 or 4 ingredients. 2 or 4 foods, necessary for life and growth? Now that is a lack of knowledge on nutrition!
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                    • #11
                      Diagnosis: Munchausen by proxy.
                      Wow. Unbelievable.

                      I feel your frustration, Shannon.

                      For years now, I have transcribed hundreds of diagnosis lists that look just like this:
                      ADMISSION DIAGNOSES:
                      1. Status post transient ischemic attack.
                      2. Coronary artery disease.
                      3. Diabetes mellitus, type 2.
                      4. Hypercholesterolemia.
                      5. Rheumatoid arthritis.
                      6. Depression.
                      7. Hypertension.
                      8. Morbid obesity.

                      Look at that list; it's representative of what I see, day in and day out. Everything on that list is either caused by diet or at least mediated by it. I would say that 70-80% of the people in the hospital at any given time have eaten themselves there.
                      "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Minxxa View Post
                        What a drag Shannon. :-/

                        this is not nearly as frustrating, but I'm studying to be an MFT (therapist) and there's no mention whatsoever of diet being an issue with depression. I'm not even sure I'd be able to mention diet to a client... sad state of affairs...
                        Have a look at this case - this lady has schizophrenia of 65 years standing and after 8 days on a low carb diet the voices and visions disappeared and she has had no recurrence. Not mention diet - I'd say this goes some way towards proving it is of prime importance (pun intended!).

                        Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets: a case report and review of the literature

                        Abstract:
                        We report the unexpected resolution of longstanding schizophrenic symptoms after starting a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet. After a review of the literature, possible reasons for this include the metabolic consequences from the elimination of gluten from the diet, and the modulation of the disease of schizophrenia at the cellular level.


                        Full Text: Bryan D Kraft and Eric C Westman, Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets: a case report and review of the literature. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2009; 6 : 10.
                        Odille
                        F 58 / 170cms / SW 131.5 kgs / Current 112.4/ GW 65
                        following Primal Lifestyle and swimming my way to health

                        My Primal Blog / Photo Blog / RedBubble shop / My Calendars / My Facebook

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                        • #13
                          yeah. i had a conversation with a fellow parent thursday.

                          she is inviting us over for dinner, and asked what we eat. i told her that we just changed our diet to primal, and we don't eat any grains. and she goes "oh, you are doing low-carb like me." (she has been avoiding bread, pasta, and flour, but eating rice cakes, rice, quinoa, potatoes, etc). and i said "not really. it's just that we don't eat grains and legumes. we do eat a lot of carbs -- vegetables, fruit, some sweet potatoes, root vegetables. and she said "you have to eat SOME grains, SOME carbs." and i just thought, "i'm not going to explain that vegetables and fruit and sweet potatoes and root vegetables *are* carbs." and i said "well, we do, just not grains."

                          then she told me that i didn't need to loose weight (i know), and that since she's known me (about 8 months) i've lost about 10 kilos (20 lbs). this, of course, is completely ridiculous, because when i was weighed before i moved here (doctor, for immigration purposes), i weighed 135. when i weighed myself last (sometime in october), i weighed 130. i figure that i probably weigh that much now, but since i don't have a scale, i do not know. but, since i have been here--due to all of the walking-with-kid, i have gotten a LOT leaner, and so has my husband. our clothes are very baggy. lol! and in the last two weeks, we've gotten *much* leaner (and stronger) very quickly.

                          but, she did insist that "at least Hawk needs bread!" well, i don't mind if he has it, but we dont' have it in the house. and he gets the buns at play group--so that's no problem. and quite frankly, our choice of schooling (steiner) is practically based in baking bread, but they do it gluten free. i could probably get them to switch to a nut-based flour if i asked. but i haven't. i don't mind if he has 2 mini muffins once a week.

                          so, yeah, you're fine.

                          and i hate BSing my way through exams.

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                          • #14
                            Analog6: I knew a woman in San Francisco who was doing PhD-level research on sugar's effect on schizophrenia. She said the impact was MASSIVE.
                            "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food." -- Hippocrates

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Analog6 View Post
                              Schizophrenia, gluten, and low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diets: a case report and review of the literature
                              Holy the crap, Analog, that case study is amazing. The literature review is really fascinating too! My husband has a lot of clients with schizophrenia -- I told him all about it and he's sharing with the other psych professionals at his company. Thank you so much for sharing!
                              "Trust me, you will soon enter a magical land full of delicious steakflowers, with butterbacons fluttering around over the extremely rompable grass and hillsides."

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