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Adding more saturated fat to a crumby diet - healthy??

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  • Adding more saturated fat to a crumby diet - healthy??

    Forgive me, I'm sure this question has been asked before, but can I find the thread? Can I thump.

    I know that good, wholesome animal fat is a natural part of the Primal diet. (And this makes me happy.)

    But like lots of people, my other half still eats grains, sugar and assorted things from packets; I only cook one of his meals each day. What effect is it likely to have on his health that our shared meal now contains much more saturated fat? In other words - is a diet with some junk carbs + saturates significantly worse for him than junk carbs and lower fat?

  • #2
    I personally see no problem with the fats, but fats with sugar is a wonderful way to put on tons of weight.

    If you are the cook tinker with the cooking on them and make primal lower carb meals with fats and let the SO eat the crap on his/her own time.

    Just be aware if he is inactive the increase in intake can expand the waist line.
    If your food is fast, maybe you should fast.

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    • #3
      He has the magic thinness gene, so any harm done will be invisible - which is why I'm asking, really. In a way I'm lucky that when I eat grains, I get fat: hard to miss. Not so much when you can eat anything at all and stay rail-thin.

      Yes, I'm tinkering gently with the cooking, and pastry, pasta and pizza are quietly becoming rarer and rarer. But his other two meals and all snacks are consistently wheat-based. You know how omnipresent the stuff is .

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      • #4
        I'll say that before I got started with this my boyfriend was/is Primal. The only Primal meals I ate, were when I was with him at Dinner mostly, my other two meals were never primal and always of the starchy/pastry variety. Sometimes I would try and eat the way he prescribed, but it never really did last long, because I would fall back into the familiar way of eating.

        Then one day I decided, it would be better to be healthy and changed all my meals, I live with him now so I really don't have to worry about the bad eating. I've come to realize that when someone gets sick and tired of the way they are eating, they will change. But, you can't force anyone to change.

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        • #5
          Agree completely. Don't know about you, but I don't think I've ever changed anything because someone else told me I should. The question isn't 'How can I get him to change?' but 'Given that he's not changing, how can I be sure I'm not doing him harm with what I provide?'

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hilary View Post
            He has the magic thinness gene, so any harm done will be invisible - which is why I'm asking, really. In a way I'm lucky that when I eat grains, I get fat: hard to miss. Not so much when you can eat anything at all and stay rail-thin.

            Yes, I'm tinkering gently with the cooking, and pastry, pasta and pizza are quietly becoming rarer and rarer. But his other two meals and all snacks are consistently wheat-based. You know how omnipresent the stuff is .
            Are we married to the same man? My husband is also rail-thin, regardless of what he eats. He eats primal most evenings because I'm the cook, but he still eats bran flakes and toast for breakfast and sandwiches for lunch. I've also worried about whether I'm doing him harm in the process, but I'm hoping that the extra emphasis on vegetables in the evenings is offsetting any new damage the extra sat-fat+existing grain is doing.
            Liz.

            Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
            Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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            • #7
              If he is super active then there should be no problems since he should burn through any extra nutrients. If he is not active there may be a rise in his trigs. Yes fatty liver is not visible. He may already have fatty liver and not know it.
              Don't be a paleotard...

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

              http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

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              • #8
                Mm - so are you saying that 'regular' diet + extra saturates = rising triglycerides? Just the kind of thing I was hoping no-one would say.

                Maybe I can make lunch for him once or twice a week - trout + salad or burger + salad, for a change from microwaved pizza. Every little helps, right?

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                • #9
                  I think this brings up a good point about sat fat in general. It's not the saturated fat that causes problems - it's the sugary, processed foods. However, if most people eating a crappy diet add more fats, they tend to gain weight and then assume it's the added fat. This all comes down to hormones and how your body handles any food in the presence of a high grain/sugar diet.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hilary View Post
                    Mm - so are you saying that 'regular' diet + extra saturates = rising triglycerides? Just the kind of thing I was hoping no-one would say.

                    Maybe I can make lunch for him once or twice a week - trout + salad or burger + salad, for a change from microwaved pizza. Every little helps, right?
                    NO. Eating fat won't increase fasting triglyceride levels. This is well documented and even the Amer Heart Assoc agrees that a higher carb diet is what increases TRGs.

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                    • #11
                      I'd like to add an anecdote to this discussion.

                      Over the Thanksgiving break, I ate virtually the same diet I had been losing weight with for the three months prior, which included copious amounts of saturated fat. I mean ridiculous amounts. However, I made one addition to my diet in this period: I began eating far more fruit. I gained 6 lbs. in 6 days. Oh yeah.

                      The moral: Beware high-fat, high-carb diets, even if those carbs are "acceptable."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by barryman9000 View Post
                        NO. Eating fat won't increase fasting triglyceride levels. This is well documented and even the Amer Heart Assoc agrees that a higher carb diet is what increases TRGs.
                        Which is essentially what's happening. Added nutrients(calories) on a higher carb diet can cause increased trigs.
                        Don't be a paleotard...

                        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...oxidation.html

                        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...torage-qa.html

                        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat...rn-fat-qa.html

                        http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nut...-you-need.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by chima_p View Post
                          Which is essentially what's happening. Added nutrients(calories) on a higher carb diet can cause increased trigs.
                          "The real story is that fats in the diet decrease triglycerides - at all other times except after a meal. The higher the fat content of your diet, the lower your triglycerides will be in a fasting blood draw. This has been well-established in numerous diet trials comparing low-fat with low-carbohydrate diets."
                          - Dr. William Davis

                          The point is still "higher carb diet." It's not the fat that causes an increase in TRGs

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Hilary View Post
                            Agree completely. Don't know about you, but I don't think I've ever changed anything because someone else told me I should. The question isn't 'How can I get him to change?' but 'Given that he's not changing, how can I be sure I'm not doing him harm with what I provide?'
                            So glad you posted this. I have the same situation but mine does NOT have the magic thinness gene. I'm concerned as well. My experience with grains and sugar vs. fat tends to lean toward the either/or. Seems to me that both would really be a problem?
                            Strong is the new Skinny!

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                            • #15
                              And yes, I know that the grain/sugar is the ultimate no-no.
                              Strong is the new Skinny!

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