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Broth meat: worth eating?

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  • Broth meat: worth eating?

    This weekend I grabbed a turkey while they were still on sale. I used the carcass to make broth and there was a lot of meat still left on the bones. The biggest pot I had access to barely fit all the bones (it was a 22-pounder), so I actually boiled the bones/meat twice to extract all the goodness; the second batch was somewhat weaker, but still well-colored and will probably work pretty well, especially if reduced.

    On to my question:
    Is the meat from making the broth worth eating or has all the goodness/nutrition leached out? It taste pretty bland, but I figure I can eat it along with the broth or with some scrambled eggs or whatever.

  • #2
    I usually use that to make soup. I assume the protein is still there. ?? Not sure.

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    • #3
      The bone gelatin's definitely still there, and that's worthwhile. Plus residual fat. And I'm sure it still has protein. Use it for a base to make more soup, or just drink it warm in a mug. Can't be bad for you.
      carl's cave

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      • #4
        I go back and forth on this... sometimes I eat it because I'm cheap and I don't want to waste food, and other times I just say "screw it" because it's so flavorless at that point that I don't enjoy it.
        "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

        I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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        • #5
          I had this same problem after Thanksgiving. Even when you pull of all the meat you can from a turkey and then use the carcass for stock, there is still a ton of meat that falls off. In my case, it was 4 cups worth based on the measuring containers I used. I gave most of it to my dog for his meals after carefully picking through for any bones.

          You mentioned two things that were the exact same things I did: use some for omlettes or add back into the broth you just made, but most went to my dog.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the replies everyone. It would make sense that it still contains protein. I'll work it into soups and omelets.

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            • #7
              I've heard the left-over meat is good for making hash, or adding into something heavily spiced like a curry.

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              • #8
                I start cooking stock in the afternoon and run it overnight. After that amount of time, any meat on the carcass has zero appeal for me. One time I made a second batch of stock from the same carcass, and it was almost flavorless. So, my policy is to make one batch of stock, strain it, and toss the carcass. And, by toss the carcass, I mean I literally toss it over the hill south of the house for the critters and microbes to do with as they please.

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                • #9
                  When I'm making stock with bone-in meat, I leave the meat in only long enough to cook it to tender, then remove the meat and continue to make bone stock. Seems to work well: both meat and stock are rich and tasty.
                  Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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